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Indirect hit from Hurricane Sally swamps Brunswick, Ga., Corps

Indirect hit from Hurricane Sally swamps Brunswick, Ga., Corps

By: David Ibata

Most of the destruction wrought by Hurricane Sally happened in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle on the Gulf Coast, but it only took part of the storm brushing past to cause havoc with The Salvation Army corps in Brunswick, Georgia, on the Atlantic.

“Although we did not get a direct hit, the storm pulled moisture from the Atlantic across our area as it built into a hurricane, giving us about 10 inches of rain in isolated areas, mainly downtown Brunswick,” said Sergeant Pamela Starr, administrator at The Salvation Army of the Golden Isles. “The early morning of Sept. 16, we received several inches of rain in just a few hours.”

About 1½ inches ended up inside the chapel and fellowship hall of the corps building. Carpeting, floor tile, and wooden furniture and doors were total losses. Not to mention there’s mold and mildew in the walls and baseboards. The altar also was water-damaged and will have to be refurbished.

“We don’t use the building very often, so we didn’t find the damage until about 36 hours after the storm,” Sergeant Starr said. “By the time we called ServPro, so many other people had reported losses, we were last on the list.”

Across the street, the corps administration building sustained minor damage from a leaking roof. The Red Shield Services shelter came through unscathed. The mobile feeding unit (canteen) was parked outside and had water up to its floorboard and in the cab and rear of the vehicle, “but a wet vac took care of that,” Sergeant Starr said. “Our van was watertight and did not sustain damage.”

Things could have been worse. Earlier this summer, the corps replaced the wooden pews in the chapel with individual chairs. The pews surely would have been lost, but the metal-legged chairs, their upholstered fabric high above the water, came through OK.

So did everything else on shelves off the floor, such as books and other materials. Happily, the water also stopped short of the piano, and the instrument survived, if out of tune.

All the undamaged stuff now goes into a big shipping container in the corps parking lot while clean-up and repairs continue. The corps is awaiting word from its insurance agent and expects to be out of its building at least two months.

In the meantime, Sergeant Starr said, “We are now going to have Angel Tree sign-ups in the shelter instead of the corps – even having some of it outside on the porch in order to maintain social distancing. You’ve got to do what you’ve got to do.”

Having vacated its building earlier this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the corps returned in August and had met only four Sundays before the flood. Now it’s back to “Church in a Box.” Sergeant Starr packs up boxes with written songs, prayers, Scripture reading, mission alignment message, lesson and other contents, and delivers them to corps families every Sunday morning.

“Just continue to pray for us. Really pray for us,” Sergeant Starr said. “It’s tough to be out of the corps building. We had just gotten back in there. We have a small congregation, and we’ve been trying to build it up, and then this happened. It’s a setback. But we were planning to start worship in the park; this will just get us out and about quicker.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Coronavirus cancels train, but ‘Holiday Express’ fundraising is full speed ahead

Coronavirus cancels train, but ‘Holiday Express’ fundraising is full speed ahead

For nearly two decades, the Kansas City Southern Railroad has dispatched a “KCS Holiday Express” to communities across the South and Midwest to spread good cheer and raise funds for The Salvation Army. The COVID-19 outbreak has canceled this year’s excursion, but the fund-raising will go on.

The Kansas City, Missouri-based railroad has set up a 2020 KCS Holiday Express website where donations can be made: http://www.salarmy.us/HolidayExpress

Traditionally, the Holiday Express has stopped in 20 or more communities, drawing big crowds in five or six states between Thanksgiving and Christmas. At each stop, visitors can board the train, meet Santa and his elves, and tour three cars of a six-car train festooned in holiday lights and decorations. Funds raised at each stop go toward warm clothing and other necessities for children in need.

“While it is not safe to gather for free visits with Santa Claus and tours of the Holiday Express train this year, the need for the charitable component of the program is greater than ever,” said Patrick J. Ottensmeyer, KCS president and CEO.

The KCS Holiday Express has raised more than $2.1 million for The Salvation Army over the last 19 years. Communities designated to receive funds this year include Beaumont, Corpus Christi, Dallas, Houston, Laredo and Port Arthur in Texas; Baton Route, New Orleans, Shreveport and Westlake in Louisiana; Gulfport, Jackson and Vicksburg in Mississippi; Decatur, Arkansas; and Heavener, Oklahoma.

The 2020 train honors one of the event’s founding elves, Tillie Caileff, who was integral to the Holiday Express program’s success and who passed away earlier this year.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Augusta command capitalizes on chance to upgrade Family Store operation

Augusta command capitalizes on chance to upgrade Family Store operation

By: David Ibata

The Salvation Army in Augusta, Georgia, had a problem: An obsolete building that did not work well as a Family Store, in a location that no longer made sense, that cost too much to operate, with a long-term lease that could not easily be gotten out of. Then, a work of Providence.

“Another company reached out to us and wanted the location and was willing to buy us out of our lease, so it was a win-win,” said Major Douglas McClure, Augusta area commander.

That opened the way to the creation of The Salvation Army Augusta Donation Center, whose sole purpose is to process incoming goods for the Family Stores. It’s a model Major McClure hopes will lead to economic self-sufficiency for some of the Augusta Command’s social service programs.

Augusta, a city of about 201,000 people 150 miles east of Atlanta, is a small-store market, Major McClure said; a small retailer that devotes most of its space to sales can be successful. Yet a traditional, nonprofit thrift store must devote a big chunk of real estate to prepping donated goods for resale; “if you don’t have a place to process things, it won’t work.”

The Salvation Army this summer closed its former store on Wrightsboro Road near the Augusta Mall regional shopping center; roughly one-third of the unit’s 30,000 square feet was devoted to processing. The Donation Center officially opened Sept. 1 in a leased, 12,000-square-foot building on Benchmark Drive west of the city. The entire space is dedicated to handling incoming goods.

“It houses all baling operations, has steel racks for long-term storage, pallet racks, a testing center for electronics, a processing area for clothing, and a truck bay, which is nice – we can actually get a truck in and out of there at dock height,” Major McClure said. “It also sits on the Richmond and Columbia county line, so it’s a good location for receiving donations.”

The Augusta Command continues to operate a Family Store with 6,000 square feet across the Savannah River in North Augusta, South Carolina.

The strategy, being spearheaded by Rick Moore, director of operations, is to eventually open four more similarly sized stores whose stock will come from the Donation Center. Because the stores won’t process donations, they’ll be able to devote up to 85 percent of their space to sales.

Also, Major McClure said, “instead of getting a buggy full of clothes, you’ll get clothes neatly hung on racks, ready to sell. It will take a lot of strain off the individual stores.”

It’s not a new concept. Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Centers in major metropolitan areas process items centrally and distribute them to Family Stores. “Most Walmarts are set up the same way; it’s more of a corporate model of operation,” Major McClure said.

With more stores operating more efficiently, the major said, “we should be able to fully fund our Center of Hope and the jobs skills program with the revenues generated by the Family Stores. This will decrease our reliance on grants and individual donations, which can vary widely from year to year.”

Additionally, the new outlets could open in rural communities where The Salvation Army does not yet have a presence. Major McClure envisions them hosting “backyard vacation Bible schools, social services outreach, and community gatherings like Easter festivals and Christmas events.

“Worship services, too. Family Stores with worship are called ministry outposts. That’s a real possibility, long term. We’re getting outside our four walls and going to where the people are.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

How Georgia’s music conservatory came to bear Daniel Meeks’ name

(L-R) wife Sunshine, daughters Ana and Dakota, Daniel

All Photo Credits: Laura Dake

How Georgia’s music conservatory came to bear Daniel Meeks’ name

By: David Ibata

When Daniel Meeks learned the surprising and shocking news – on stage, at virtual youth councils in August – that The Salvation Army’s Georgia Division was honoring him by renaming its summer music program the Kimball-Meeks Music Conservatory, his first reaction was: Wait, isn’t this a little too soon?

“Because I’m still alive,” he said. “Usually these things come about after you pass away, they name something after you. But it’s a great honor. I’m grateful for the recognition.”

Meeks has been divisional music director in Georgia since 2001, shortly after he graduated from Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, with a bachelor’s degree in music education. But his connection to Salvation Army music, Georgia Division style, goes back to the summer of 1988.

The Lyman C. Kimball Music Conservatory, named for a Salvationist musician from Augusta, Georgia, was founded two years earlier as the first conservatory in the Southern Territory.

Young Daniel was 12 years old when he started attending. He and his officer parents, then-Captains William and Darlene Meeks, had recently moved from the Texas Division, and he decided to take up the cornet. Off to the conservatory he went.

“I spent six straight weeks at Camp Grandview,” Meeks said. To this day he remembers – besides the long, long time away from home – “the friends I made; the caliber of music being played, even though I was just beginning; and the people, the fellow campers and instructors.”

Meeks couldn’t stay away. Every summer, he returned to camp (he did change his instrument to the euphonium). Even after his parents were transferred in 1990 to the Maryland-West Virginia Division, he said, the conservatory “let me keep coming back.”

Meeks joined the staff as a junior instructor in 1993 and rose to senior instructor for brass. After graduating from Shepherd, he was hired as Georgia assistant DMD in May 2001. That October, he was promoted to the full job.

“The conservatory set my path to wanting to become a divisional music director,” Meeks said. “I just remember that when my parents got transferred out of Georgia, I was like look, I want to come back to Georgia some day and be the DMD. That was my goal. There were some hiccups along the way … but coming back every summer kept me connected to Georgia.”

Lt. Colonel William Mockabee, Georgia divisional commander, said of the music conservatory’s renaming, “I decided that because of Daniel’s faithfulness to The Salvation Army and the Georgia Division Music Department, this would be a fitting tribute. … He’s sat in all the seats and had the opportunity and invitation to leave a couple of times for other divisions that were interested in him, but because of his family and his dedication to Georgia, he stayed here.”

“What makes him so special to me and folks here in Georgia is, the program is about more than music proficiency. It’s about what’s going on inside a kid – their spiritual well-being, how they’re doing in school and the community. He’s proven himself interested in making well-rounded young people of those in his ministry.”

Nick Simmons-Smith agreed.

“Daniel has a phrase: Don’t quit on the kids,” said the territorial music and creative arts education secretary. “Every summer he says that to his staff. He loves pouring into young people, and he does it in a very humble and unassuming way, with careful, gentle, solid and wise leadership. And he’s really shaped a lot of young people, almost as a surrogate parent to some of them.

“Some of the kids who come into our program don’t have the best family backgrounds,” Simmons-Smith said. “Daniel’s able to speak into their lives and shape them. That’s really important for the hundreds of young people who have come through the program. He’s had an impact on their lives. Colonel Mockabee wanted to recognize the servant leadership Daniel brought to us.”

Meeks is a soldier at Atlanta Temple Corps, where he’s involved in the senior and youth music programs. He and his wife Sunshine and their daughters Ana Stezia and Dakota Syne live in Snellville, Georgia.

Meeks said the conservatory “helped build in me a passion for music and arts and how they can be used to build the kingdom of God and bring others closer to Jesus. To me, that’s the power music can have: to help build people up and form a better relationship with Christ. We have these talents God has given us. We should use them to share Christ with others.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Community Coffee Launches Hurricane Laura Relief Effort to Benefit The Salvation Army

Baton Rouge, LA (September 23, 2020) – In the wake of Hurricane Laura, Community Coffee Company has committed to donating 10% of proceeds from the sales of Community coffee and tea products in retail grocery locations in Louisiana and Texas through Oct. 31, 2020, up to $100,000, to support The Salvation Army’s Hurricane Laura relief efforts.

The Salvation Army’s mobile food pantries and meal programs have been stationed across the region since the storm made landfall on Aug. 27. Community Coffee Company has also been on the ground since the storm’s landfall, bringing its mobile beverage vehicles to serve fresh coffee to first responders, work crews and residents in impacted areas in and around Lake Charles, Louisiana.

“We have seen firsthand how this hurricane has affected our local communities, and we are humbled to play a role in the rebuilding efforts,” said Community Coffee Company CEO David Belanger. “We know that there’s still a long journey to recovery for the affected areas in Louisiana and Texas, and we’re committed to supporting these communities in the weeks and months to come.”

“We’re not just delivering food and water in these hard-hit communities — we’re bringing hope,” said Jeff Jellets, territorial disaster coordinator for The Salvation Army USA Southern Territory. “Donations like the one from Community Coffee will help us provide comfort, compassion and warm meals for storm-affected Texas and Louisiana residents in need.”

More information about Community Coffee Company’s hurricane relief efforts is available at www.communitycoffee.com/relief.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Kroc Center helps ‘Anchor’ kids in virtual learning

Kroc Center helps ‘Anchor’ kids in virtual learning

By: Josie Showers and Marleen Mallory

Hebrews 6:19 (TNIV): “We have this hope as an anchor for the soul, firm and secure.”

“In these unknown days, the Anchor Learning Center stands as a secure place of support as we navigate this academic year successfully alongside our Kroc families.” The purpose statement for The Anchor Learning Center is the guide we use to ensure we are providing a safe learning environment for children to access their school’s virtual education while they are not physically attending school.

Late this summer, in response to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic, the public school districts surrounding the Hampton Roads, Virginia, Kroc Center announced their virtual learning plans for the 2020-21 school year. This spurred the Kroc Center to step in to help families.

Within days, the Anchor Learning Center (ALC) became a reality. From day one, it has been at capacity, with a waiting list and daily receiving phone calls from interested families.

Enrollment was opened to the families participating in existing Kroc programming and membership. Our enrollment profile includes 22 children from 13 schools in two school districts. The program is intended for grades 1-5; however, there are two families of eligible students with siblings in sixth grade, and they have been able to join.

The Kroc Center provides staff to monitor and assist with virtual learning, school supplies as needed, internet access for virtual learning, computers for students who need them and additional activities outside of their scheduled school classes, such as crafts, music lessons and physical education. Our partnership with the USDA Food Bank Program and Food Bank of Southern Hampton Roads ensures our children receive breakfast and lunch, plus an afternoon snack each day.

The Kroc Center administration ensures government safety and health guidelines are followed, providing a safe environment for our students. Staff and families are asked a series of health questions each day, and students’ temperatures are checked upon arrival. Extra attention to cleaning, use of hand sanitizing stations and handwashing are a priority throughout the day. The students’ workstations are measured to be six feet apart (with the exception of siblings).

The week prior to the start of school was an intensive training week for staff much more accustomed to running summer camp. Training included several days of classroom management with an educational consultant, additional food bank training, Norfolk Public School virtual training for child care providers, training in health regulations specifically for COVID-19 and organizing creative activities for children when they are not actively engaged in online education.

The Anchor Learning Center is a vital part of our community. Two elementary school principals with students in the program have visited and expressed their gratitude.

Parents have been overwhelmingly thankful as well. Two families stated they were contemplating quitting their jobs to make sure their children could attend school; the ALC allowed them to stay employed and rest secure in their children’s education.

Also, 86 percent of the children in the program receive an income-based scholarship. The base rate for the program is $100 a week, and scholarships reduce families’ weekly outlay to $15 to $50. From the beginning, an important factor in the program’s development has been to ensure participation wasn’t limited because of the cost.

The Anchor Learning Center at the Kroc Hampton Roads is a vital part of the academic and developmental success of the students enrolled.

Josie Showers is program director and Marleen Mallory is assistant program director at The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center of Hampton Roads. Related story: “The education gap was shrinking before COVID-19,” https://bloom.bg/3hRwdp2

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Couple Keeps Dishing It Out While Battling A Crisis Of Their Own

PENSACOLA, FL. – Before Hurricane Sally dropped nearly four months worth of rain on the Florida panhandle in four days, The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services was preparing to respond. Ten mobile feeding units (canteens) each carrying 500 meals, were deployed to Pensacola to provide food, hydration, and spiritual care for those left in the wake of Hurricane Sally’s destruction.

One canteen was manned by Mike and Jeanne Flynn, a married couple that volunteers with The Salvation Army in the Clearwater area. “I’ve been volunteering and doing service since I was 13,” said Jeanne while scooping chili and chatting with survivors. “It’s about the people and neighbors helping neighbors.”

Jeanne and Mike load up 1,000 meals to serve from their canteen every day during their deployment for Hurricane Sally; always with a smile on their face and bright energy. When asked how many disasters they have been deployed to, they both looked at each other and give a chuckle. “Hurricanes Michael, Florence, and Irma just to name a few.” Jeanne stops to interact with a young lady and her child as they exchange pleasantries, making sure that the mother has some extra snacks for her kids.

Mike and Jeanne move fluidly within the tight space of the mobile kitchen. “We talk to them and understand their struggle. “We all need help sometimes,” says Mike. In January of this year Mike was diagnosed with grade 9 prostate cancer and shortly thereafter lymphoma in his lower back. “It was a double cancer,” he says. “I had 44 treatments.” Jeanne interjects, “He never missed anything!” He chuckles and finishes his thought, “I never let it slow me down.” When asked what  kept him motivated him during such a difficult time, he smiled with gratitude in his eyes stating, “I’m blessed. I refused to let it stop me.”  Watching him work, it is obvious that it did not.

Since arriving in Pensacola, Mike and Jeanne have not stopped. The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services staff and volunteers like Jeanne and Mike have helped serve the local communities with more than 25,000 meals, nearly 17,000 drinks, and 20,100 snacks. Additionally, 170 clean up kits have been given out so far and 236 people have been provided with emotional and spiritual care. Seven of those that received spiritual care gave their life to Christ while with our pastoral team.

The Salvation Army is delivering 10,000 meals a day within the Pensacola area and will continue to serve as long as the necessary.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama Serves Students In Need Amid Hurricane Sally Relief

BALDWIN COUNTY, Ala. (September 22, 2020) Category 2 Hurricane Sally caused widespread power outages across southern Baldwin County as it landed late last week. Significant debris, downed trees, and downed power lines left the Southern Baldwin, and Mobile Counties affected. Power companies estimate that most power will be restored within 7-10 days. The Salvation Army is continuing services in Baldwin County, adding services in Magnolia, Alabama. Power has returned to 70% of Baldwin County residents, and the majority of power is estimated to be restored by next week. Baldwin County Public Schools will reopen on September 30, and The Salvation Army is serving students in need of meals with teachers’ help throughout Baldwin County.

“We’ve had units set up all across the county. We’ve been in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach at the Sports Complexes. We also traveled to Fairhope to assist those who were cut off by trees and other debris and could not get to the Sports Complexes for service. We’ve also been able to work with community partners left and right,” shared Captain Sheri Jones, Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama Commanding Officer.

“We’ve been in Foley at the soccer fields, the Seminole fire station, and we’re also going to Silverhill today. We are preparing to work with a group of teachers who will help us get to their students who cannot access food. We are packing food for the teachers to deliver to their students. We’ve served more than 22,000 meals since we’ve been on the ground during Hurricane Sally relief and will continue to serve our community,” Captain Jones added. 

The best way to support the disaster work of The Salvation Army by making a financial donation at www.helpsalvationarmy.org or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY. For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, please go to www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org and watch for regular updates on our social media pages at www.facebook.com/salarmyalm/ and www.twitter.com/salarmyalm.

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available. Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support. HOPEline hours are 8 AM to 11 PM CDT, 7 days a week.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

A Home Away From Home For EDS Team at Anayat House in Beaumont, Texas

Beaumont, Texas (September 22, 2020) – Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services (EDS) volunteers have been staying at Anayat House, a non-profit organization that provides overnight accommodations for family members of patients in Beaumont area hospitals. Currently closed for renovations, the owners received word that The Salvation Army volunteers needed somewhere to stay and generously offered to open their doors.

“We flooded during Tropical Storm Imelda in 2019 and had more than eight inches of water in the house. Unfortunately we’ve been unable to open for the guests we normally serve because of ongoing renovations and since March have been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Tressa Clarke, Executive Director of Anayat House. “After Hurricane Laura hit we heard from the United Way of Beaumont that The Salvation Army needed somewhere to house their disaster relief team. Even though we’re not completely through with renovations I knew how much a soft bed and hot shower would mean to the relief workers. We are delighted to help.”

Several years ago, Anayat Moujazeb lay dying in his hospital bed after suffering an abdominal aneurysm. His daughter, Mimi Daniali, stayed by his side in his hospital room. During that time Mimi met several others who were in a similar position as herself and caring for ailing family members while in the hospital. Mimi bonded with these individuals, saw a significant need, and wanted to provide housing solutions for these families to minimize both the financial burden and mental toll they face.

Shortly after her father died, Mimi found a four-bedroom house for sale one block away from St. Elizabeth Hospital in Beaumont. She purchased the house, renovated the entire property, and paid for everything out of pocket. Twenty-six years later, the Anayat House has expanded to accommodate more than 12 individuals at a time. Each suite has a bathroom/shower unit, two-beds, a small refrigerator and snack bar. The property also includes a large sitting room, dining room, kitchen, outdoor patio and free laundry facilities.

Twelve Salvation Army volunteers stayed at Anayat House throughout their 14-day deployment, from September 6-19. “Tressa and her team offered the property to us at minimal cost,” said Kathleen Kouns, EDS Volunteer and Training Coordinator for The Salvation Army in Texas. “The Anayat House is regularly cleaned for us, free of charge, and amenities are provided. We are so grateful to have such a comfortable place available for our volunteers to rest and recharge after long, hot days serving those impacted by Hurricane Laura. We pray that Anayat House will soon be able to return to its mission of supporting those enduring the stress, expense and heartache of medical crisis.”

In response to Hurricane Laura The Salvation Army of Texas has provided 143,909 meals, 61,758 snacks and 90,694 drinks. Additionally, 3,219 food boxes, 1,242 clean up kits, and 3,529 infant supplies were distributed to those affected by the storm.

“We may not be able to help the people we normally serve, but we can help those who are working so hard to get other people back on their feet,” said Clarke. “Just because there is a natural disaster doesn’t mean accidents stop happening or cancer subsides, or heartaches quit – there’s no discrimination there. It has been our pleasure to have the hard-working volunteers of The Salvation Army stay with us because we know they are truly doing God’s work.”

For the latest information please go to www.disaster.salvationarmy.org and watch for regular updates on our social media pages at www.facebook.com/salvationarmytexas/ and www.twitter.com/salarmytx. To make a donation go to www.helpsalvationarmy.org or call 1-800-SALARMY.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Little Caesars Brings Pizza Love Kitchen to Pace Communities

Pace, FL (September 22, 2020) – Five days after Hurricane Sally made landfall, many communities in Pace, Florida are still feeling her devastation. Food and hydration have been a major concern for many families in underserved communities. Little Caesars has teamed up with The Salvation Army to serve pizzas for lunch starting at noon at Immanuel Baptist Church located at 4187 US-90, Pace, Florida 32571 on September 22, 2020.  

“This is hopefully something that will not only help fill empty stomachs, but bring up morale within the community,” said Kevin Chinault, Acting Incident Commander for The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services Hurricane Sally response in Pensacola Florida. “We are very grateful for Little Caesars and their generous hearts during this difficult time.” 

The Little Caesars Love Kitchen travels across the United States to help those in need. These restaurants on wheels have served more than three million people. Local franchise owners donate the resources necessary to make each Love Kitchen serving a success.  

As of September 20, 2020, The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services response in Escambia and Santa Rosa has served:  

  • 37,189- Meals 
  • 22,846- Drinks 
  • 29,703- Snacks 
  • 273- Cleaning Kits 
  • 287- Emotional & Spiritual Care 

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org