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Unprecedented demands challenge The Salvation Army’s creativity

Unprecedented demands challenge The Salvation Army’s creativity

By: Dan Childs

An old adage states that necessity is the mother of invention, and as the COVID-19 public health crisis in the U.S. imposes countless demands to meet unprecedented needs, The Salvation Army has been challenged in unprecedented ways. Commands across the nation have been responding to needs they have never encountered before, and out of necessity, many commands are taking innovative approaches to ministry.

The Hot Springs, Arkansas, Corps has been serving evening meals and has recently added a creative approach to outreach during these troubled times. The Devo and Donuts outreach provides breakfast to homeless people and other at-risk individuals to help meet physical needs and, in the best tradition of The Salvation Army, includes a brief devotional that provides encouragement and spiritual nourishment.

The Chattanooga, Tennessee, 614 Corps, meanwhile, is about to provide a service that no one could have envisioned even a few weeks ago. The corps has received funding from the city to function as and isolation and quarantine shelter for homeless people. The corps is being equipped with air filters, plastic barriers and other items. The shelter is scheduled to open April 10.

Older people have been identified as one of the prime at-risk groups in the coronavirus crisis, and in Baltimore, the Central Maryland Area Command is working with city officials to start up a feeding program for seniors, with funding for one month. Partnering with the Department of Aging and the Department of Transportation, the Army in Baltimore will help provide up to 20,000 meals for seniors. The meals will be prepared each day for seniors who are unable to cook for themselves.

In Virginia’s Tidewater area, the Hampton Roads Kroc Center had to cancel an event because of the coronavirus threat and was left with an abundance of snacks which were earmarked for the event. The Kroc Center staff decided to repurpose the snacks as “Happies for Helpers,” gifts bags full of treats that were made available to some of the heroes of this crisis – healthcare workers serving on the frontlines at Norfolk’s Sentara General Hospital. The nurses and other healthcare personnel who received the snack bags expressed their appreciation for being remembered in this way and were in turn reassured that they were in the prayers of the Hampton Roads Area Command.

The USA South’s focus during the pandemic is keeping Salvation Army housing programs open, continuing to provide meals to needy individuals and families and distributing essential supplies, such as food boxes, cleaning products and personal protective equipment, including masks and gloves.

The territory’s Emotional and Spiritual Hotline (844-458-4673) is manned by 16 Salvation Army officers and employees from 9 a.m.-9 p.m., seven days a week, with Spanish-language assistance available.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

The Salvation Army Continues to Meet an Expanding Need in the Face of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Atlanta, GA: Around the world, The Salvation Army is shifting and increasing service to meet the expanding need in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. That extends to the Southeastern United States, with the ever-persistent aim to help others.

The work continues in Florence, Alabama, with increased cleaning measures and extended hours for the emergency shelter. In addition, the Florence Corps is partnering with local senior living facilities to deliver prepared meals, frozen food and household goods, with The Salvation Army also delivering meals to the YMCA for distribution to first responders.

The Salvation Army of Augusta, Georgia will receive a meaningful influx of funding from the United Way, Community Foundation and CSRA COVID-19 Emergency Response fund, with much of that grant going to convert the Center of Hope emergency shelter to a 24-hour facility. With the closing of local family stores, the grant is badly needed, especially with feeding increasing in the shelter. The Salvation Army is now serving three meals and two snacks per day, and the funding also helps with the need to increase staffing to meet the extended need.

A group of neighbors in St. Petersburg, Florida responded to a call to produce washable, reusable face masks in order to cut down spread of the COVID-19 virus. More than 100 colorful and washable masks were donated to The Salvation Army by the group, representing enough to provide for each resident and staff member at the local emergency shelter.

Continuing a regular Blog Post written by Brad Rowland, Staff Writer, Southern Spirit Newspaper

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

‘Big Blue Bear’ shares goodwill in Savannah

‘Big Blue Bear’ shares goodwill in Savannah

By: David Ibata

A furry, man-sized apparition was seen walking the streets of Savannah, Georgia, recently – not Bigfoot or Sasquatch, but a big blue bear wearing a Salvation Army officer’s hat.

“To be frank, I was tired of bad news and difficult situations and just wanted an afternoon of fun,” said Major Paul Egan of the Savannah Corps.

With the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus, Major Egan could not return the bear costume he had borrowed from Southern Territorial headquarters. So, he put the costume on and went to visit some children – at safe remove for “social distancing,” of course.

“We’d heard about ‘bear hunts’ going on in communities across the nation” – families walk around their neighborhoods, spotting teddy bears put out at people’s homes – “and April 1 was coming up, and I thought, what if the bear went and thanked some of the people doing these things in their communities?”

The Territorial Youth Department in Atlanta had loaned Big Blue Bear – yes, that’s its name – to the Savannah Corps last year for its 10,000 Scoops Challenge, a community ice cream social and fund-raiser. Big Blue came out again for the Red Kettle Kick-Off. The corps intended to return him, one of these days, but one thing led to another and the costume never made it home before the coronavirus pandemic in March shut down nonessential travel in Georgia.

The bear has been a children’s celebrity for 20 years, according to Sheila Livingston, territorial Christian education and youth discipleship director. He and Junior Soldier Girl have appeared at youth rallies, summer camps and community events.

“Big Blue Bear is from the International Congress of 2000,” Livingston said. “Junior Soldier Girl is probably five or six years old; we got her for a Junior Soldier event at a commissioning.”

On Wednesday, April 1, Major Egan said, “we walked around the neighborhood between our two buildings, the corps and the shelter. We also went out to the Farmer’s Market truck that parks in front of our building every Wednesday.”

Big Blue waved to families picking up meals provided by the Second Harvest Food Bank while school is out, and to women and children recently moved to a temporary shelter in the corps community center, where they have more space for social distancing (men remain at the main shelter). The bear carried a sign, “Thanks for making this time Bearable,” with the hashtag, #bearhunting.

“When we approached houses and waved at the families inside, they got it pretty quick by the poster we were holding up,” Major Egan said. “They all wanted to get pictures of the bear. We were happy for that. We’re trying to be good in Savannah not to put crowds together, so we’d see one family at a time and made sure everyone kept their distance.”

“One lady thought it was great. She expressed her disappointment to us that her grandkids were quarantined away from her and couldn’t see us.”

What’s next for Big Blue? “Easter will be a real time of disappointment for folks not to be together in large church services,” Major Egan said. “I hope we can bring the bear out again to help people find a way to safely enjoy life.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Carolinas kids won’t be disappointed on Easter morning

Carolinas kids won’t be disappointed on Easter morning

By: Major Frank Duracher

Salvation Army staff and volunteers in several corps in the North and South Carolina Division are making sure that children awaiting a visit from the Easter Bunny won’t be disappointed because of the COVID-19 crisis.

During Holy Week, Major Susan Rodgers and her group are filling Easter boxes to be delivered in time for the holiday commemorating the triumphant resurrection of Christ.

“These boxes contain Easter Sunday dinner (items), filled Easter eggs for the kids to do their own egg hunt at home and Easter candy for the entire family,” Major Susan said.

The box also contains Easter Sunday kid’s activity sheets, family worship programs, toilet paper and hand soap. She also includes an Easter devotional book she had already purchased to give out on Easter Sunday long before this crisis rudely interrupted the corps church calendar.

Meanwhile in Spartanburg, South Carolina, Lieutenant Katie Tate has the Spartanburg Advisory Board members on hand to fill similar Easter boxes that will be distributed to community center and corps member families, with plans to complete the project before Good Friday.

“We have 600 eggs filled with candy to go along with card games, coloring books, crayons, sidewalk chalk and a devotional thought,” Lieutenant Katie said.

“Our hope is to bring the family together through these activities and let them know that The Salvation Army is still thinking and praying for them during these difficult days.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

The Salvation Army’s Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic is Ongoing

Atlanta, GA: The Salvation Army’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing, with the aim to meet human need in His name without discrimination. During this challenging period of life, various communities in the Southern Territory are coming together and the efforts persist.

For residents of the William Booth Garden Apartments in High Point, North Carolina, restrictions from COVID-19 changed a great deal of life, including the evaporation of weekly events that promoted the community. To step in that gap, staff from The Salvation Army distributed more than 75 care packages, including fruit cups, breakfast bars, fresh fruit and other grocery items. The packages, furnished from donations by Publix and Harris Teeter, also included toilet paper and other necessities, and they were warmly received by residents.

In Rome Georgia, The Salvation Army is stepping in to provide increased financial assistance to individuals and families facing the reality of job loss. Funds are made available through Project SHARE, a program in the Georgia Division. The Salvation Army’s shelter in Rome also continues to operate 24 hours a day and 60-70 individuals are being served in a daily feeding program.

The Salvation Army is offering curbside grocery service in Fairfax County, Virginia. Residents of the area must call to set up a pickup time, but they are provided with canned vegetables, canned meats, peanut butter, cereal, cleaning supplies and fresh produce. More than 120 families were served in the first week of the initiative, with many more anticipated in the coming days.

Continuing a regular Blog Post written by Brad Rowland, Staff Writer, Southern Spirit Newspaper

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

The Salvation Army in Texas to Deliver Personal Protective Equipment in Partnership with State

DALLAS, TX (4/7/20) – The Salvation Army is partnering with the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) to provide transportation of essential Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to cities throughout the state. Deliveries will be made to strategic locations where hospitals and other essential services will collect vital emergency equipment as they continue to deal with the increased demands caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Initially planned as a pilot program to be tested in Austin, The Salvation Army received a request from TDEM to rapidly expand logistical support across Texas. Cities in each of the eight Regional Advisory Council areas will serve as PPE pickup locations and delivery will be handled by The Salvation Army beginning Tuesday, April 7.

“We are delighted to provide transportation support to the state utilizing our Salvation Army trucks and manpower at this time,” said Lt. Colonel Ronnie Raymer, Divisional Commander of The Salvation Army in Texas. “We work closely throughout the year with the Texas Division of Emergency Management, along with other state agencies, and were quick to answer the call for assistance today.”

On Monday, April 6, three trucks and drivers from The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center, typically utilized for Family Store donation pickups, collected PPE from a location in Austin. These trucks made deliveries of PPE supplies to Bryan and College Station, Waco and Killeen. With the request to expand the program to cover the rest of the state, The Salvation Army locations in Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, El Paso, Lubbock, Corpus Christi and Tyler will also be providing logistical support.

“The trucks and employees involved would typically be collecting furniture and donations for The Salvation Army Family Stores,” said Raymer. “While many of our essential services continue at this time, our stores are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic and we are thrilled to pivot our local resources to serve alongside state and local agencies. We are praying for those on the front line of the battle against the spread of COVID-19.”

The Salvation Army plans to seek federal reimbursement and TDEM has requested that transportation be available 24/7, as needed.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in heightened need in communities throughout Texas as schools have closed, people are remaining at home, and many have suffered the loss of employment or the reduction of hours. The Salvation Army continues to deliver service in every zip code in Texas, providing shelter, meals, emergency financial assistance and food boxes to those in need.

To support the ongoing ministry of The Salvation Army please go online at give.salvationarmytexas.org, call 1-800-SAL-ARMY or mail a check to your local Salvation Army office.  

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Healed and made whole: An Easter message from General Brian Peddle

Healed and made whole: An Easter message from General Brian Peddle

Surely he took on our infirmities and carried our sorrows; yet we considered him stricken by God, struck down and afflicted. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his stripes we are healed. We all like sheep have gone astray, each one has turned to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.

(Isaiah 53:4-6 Berean Study Bible)

——————–

The Easter message is the most profound, true, life-changing, life-giving message we can ever hear, respond to and participate in. In short, the Easter story is the culmination of God’s plan of salvation for the redemption and restoration of humanity. Such unconditional sacrificial love unleashes the mercy, grace and forgiveness of God. We should be experiencing boundless joy, caught up in awe and wonder, celebrating our new-found freedom and living in a new dynamic relationship with the Almighty.

We see in these verses from Isaiah just what God has done for us in Jesus. In going to the Cross, Jesus does something extremely positive, yet it involves him being subjected to pain, ridicule, brokenness and separation from the Father with whom he has shared a deep intimacy for all eternity. Jesus takes on everything that is negative, destructive and painful. This display of genuine, unconditional and sacrificial love is unparalleled in human history.

Even as we read and consider what Jesus takes on himself, we sense a release, an unburdening and a freedom. Jesus takes on our infirmities and carries our sorrows. Yes, there is a glimpse of the humanity of Jesus here as the Word that became flesh (John 1:14) – fully human while fully divine – understands the frailty, weakness and imperfection on a personal level. Having said that, we need to recognize that there is much more going on.

Jesus is doing more than identifying with us. He is taking on our weaknesses, infirmities and sorrows so that we don’t have to carry them. Link that opening statement to Philippians 4:6-7 (Do not be anxious about anything …) and 1 Peter 5:7 (Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you) to better understand what is offered to us in Jesus. Look again at what happens to Jesus – he is pierced, crushed, punished and wounded. Why would Jesus accept all of that? Why would God allow his only Son to endure all of that?

Another read of the verses from Isaiah illuminates what we receive through
this sacrifice – peace and healing for ourselves. The punishment inflicted upon Jesus brings us peace. We experience healing because Jesus was wounded. It is almost beyond our understanding, but a horribly painful moment brings us healing and a horrifically violent act brings us everlasting peace.

There is something of an unfair transaction going on that demonstrates the extravagance of God and his unmerited favor that we call grace. There is also something profoundly theological, sacrificial and covenantal taking place.

The sacrificial code and practices we find in the Old Testament are there to atone for our sins and imperfections. Here on the Cross, the spotless Lamb of God pays the ultimate sacrifice once and for all, ushering us into a new dispensation of grace and deliverance.

We have peace with God because of all that was accomplished by Jesus, and this peace is experienced by having faith in Jesus (see Romans 5:1: Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ). Yes, it’s that straightforward – we don’t have to complicate it!

The Easter story doesn’t end with Calvary. Easter Sunday is about resurrection and new life. In 2 Corinthians 5:17 we are reminded that, If anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: the old has gone, the new is here! The old reality of being held captive by sin, of death being our final enemy, is gone! On Easter Sunday, we rise to new life in Christ – that new life is eternal life, it encapsulates victory over sin and death, it includes our healing and wholeness, it is a life of deep peace (Isaiah 26:3: You will keep in perfect peace those whose minds are steadfast, because they trust in you).

This Easter, you can experience healing and wholeness in Christ. It’s why Jesus came to earth. It’s what God desires most for you.

  • Scripture quotations are from the New International Version unless stated otherwise
  • The Bible verses from Isaiah are brought to life through the song ‘Surely He Has Borne Our Griefs’, sung here by Govan Songsters (United Kingdom Territory with the Republic of Ireland)
Source: southernspiritonline.org

The Salvation Army serves up ‘Sacks of Love’ and encouragement in Muskogee, Oklahoma

The Salvation Army serves up ‘Sacks of Love’ and encouragement in Muskogee, Oklahoma

By: Cindy Fuller

In these days of “social distancing,” The Salvation Army of Muskogee, Oklahoma, is stepping up to help those in the most need. Not only is the Army still providing food boxes through its social services office by appointment, it is taking food and words of encouragement directly into the community.

The Muskogee Salvation Army is adjusting its ministry to the poor and elderly by taking food boxes to those who are unable to get out and drive to the social services office. It is an important part of the mission and ministry of the Army to meet human needs in his name.

Stories of personal encouragement have strengthened those on the front lines of service. Shay Reeder, a Salvation Army employee, shared two stories about her food ministry. Moved to tears, one shut-in told her, “I only had a bag of green peas to eat for the last three days with some ice cubes. My insides are so empty I’ll have to eat small quantities so as not to become sick.”

The elderly, deaf shut-in then sent Reeder a “long-distance” hug of thanks.   

Another recipient of the food ministry mentioned she had just been discharged from the hospital, was on oxygen and was unable to get out of the house. She told Reeder, “I am not used to asking for help. This is truly a blessing.”

In addition to serving those who are immune-compromised, The Salvation Army’s catering truck is strategically going out into the Muskogee community with “Sacks of Love” for lunch and dinner. This ministry provides meals to anyone impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a tremendous amount of appreciation from those being served. Many people are already feeling the effects of the pandemic by having trouble finding enough food and supplies.

The truck and Salvation Army employees and volunteers are making deliveries in locations of high need and are maintaining social distancing by “honking” to let people know there are meals available.

During one delivery, a woman requested that the team check on a neighbor. When the ministry team arrived at the home, they discovered the family was in dire need of food boxes, as they had taken in homeless persons due to the pandemic. The Salvation Army provided the needed food and pastoral care to the family.         

Neighbors have also helped The Salvation Army be the ‘hands and feet” of Jesus. During a recent meal delivery route to a low-income apartment complex, neighbors went knocking on doors to ensure everyone received a meal.

Children in a high-need area are also helping. One little boy was so excited to get food, he began to dance and encouraged his friends to come over to get a meal. It was an exciting time for the little ones who have been cooped up in their homes, and a bright spot to their day.

Along with a kind word and encouragement from The Salvation Army, the “Sacks of Love” food ministry outreach is providing food for the body and for the soul during this unprecedented crisis. As someone stated, “I now have something to look forward to!”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

The Salvation Army Kroc Center Hawaii Meets Community Needs Through Emergency Response Efforts

Ewa Beach, Hawaii [April 6, 2020] – In response to the novel coronavirus pandemic, The Salvation Army has enhanced service delivery to meet the immediate needs of community members, first responders, and government partners. As a part of this effort, The Salvation Army Kroc Center Hawaii has shifted away from regular operations to provide increased community assistance and support. As of March 19, all regular Kroc Center Hawaii classes and membership offerings have been suspended.

“We know that this is a time when community needs are magnified,” said Major Phil Lum, Administrator and Corps Officer for The Salvation Army Kroc Center Hawaii. “We are in regular communication with state and county agencies and are working collectively with local businesses and organizations on outreach during these unprecedented times.”

The Salvation Army Kroc Center Hawaii is currently providing the following services to the West Oahu community:

• Food preparation and distribution for those in need

• Virtual youth group and Sunday services

• Social and spiritual community support

• Blood drives, in partnership with Blood Bank of Hawaii, are being held on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, through May 30. The events are by appointment only. Interested blood donors can schedule online at bbh.org. 

Kroc Center Hawaii is also collecting donations Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 91-3257 Kualaka’i Parkway in Ewa Beach. The following new and unopened items are being collected: 

• Personal hygiene items (shampoo, conditioner, soap, toothpaste, toothbrush, deodorant, etc.)

• Cleaning supplies (hand sanitizer, paper towels, sanitizing wipes, disinfectant spray/cleaners)

• Toilet paper (wrapped)

• Baby diapers, formula and baby food

• Adult incontinence products (Depends)

• Non-perishable food items

All donations will be provided to kupuna and families in need, first responders and healthcare workers.

Emergency Services Hotline: (808) 682-5505

An Emergency Services Hotline is available to assist those in need and answer general questions about Kroc Center Hawaii. Community members may call the hotline at (808) 682-5505. Information about Kroc Center Hawaii’s outreach efforts and available community assistance will also be updated regularly on Kroc Center Hawaii’s website at www.kroccenterhawaii.org. To find out about other community resources, community members may also call Aloha United Way’s 2-1-1 hotline.

Kroc Church Online Services and Prayer Hotline: (808) 693-8377

Community members are invited to join us for weekly online church services at krocchurch.online.church every Sunday at 8:00am and 10:00am. The Kroc Church has a Prayer Hotline to accept prayer requests and concerns.  Community members may call the hotline at (808) 693-8377.

Statewide Assistance and Support Needed

The Salvation Army Hawaiian & Pacific Islands Division is providing emergency food boxes, meals-to-go, and emotional and spiritual support at a variety of locations. For details, visit hawaii.salvationarmy.org or call 808-440-1800.

###

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

The Salvation Army is Seeking Those in Need During Coronavirus Pandemic

Atlanta, GA: The COVID-19 pandemic persists on a global scale, and The Salvation Army is seeking to help those in need during this trying time. In the Southern Territory, communities are rallying together and The Salvation Army’s work continues.

In Jacksonville, Florida, The Salvation Army assembled and delivered care packages to 50 families, touching the lives of more than 180 individuals, many of whom are facing substantial need. Care packages included meat, fresh produce, canned goods and more, and the items were accumulated through a collaboration with Feeding Northeast Florida.

The Salvation Army Kroc Center in Memphis, Tennessee is staying connected with its 10,000 members through social media, including daily inspirational messages and fitness workouts that can be utilized in an at-home setting. In partnership with the Mid-South Food Bank, the Kroc Center is also operating as a food distribution center, with 250 families gathering for the first distribution and as many as 500 families expected for the second.

A member of the men’s ministry group from the Central Virginia Area Command invested heavily in food service by spending time grilling turkey and chicken to be delivered to families in need in the community. 40 children and 25 adults were served through the work of the ministry group, which also delivered non-perishable items for future use.

Continuing a regular Blog Post written by Brad Rowland, Staff Writer, Southern Spirit Newspaper

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org