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The Salvation Army Responds to Oregon Wildfires – Update #7

The Salvation Army is providing meals and resources in counties across Oregon. In response to the Oregon Wildfires, The Salvation Army has served 21,898 meals for evacuees and firefighters as of Monday, September 21.

  • Served Meals: 21,898
  • Snacks: 13,969
  • Drinks: 16,229
  • Home Delivered Meals: 9,185
  • Food Boxes: 1,811
  • Emotional & Spiritual Care: 1,932

The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Teams continue to provide meals and services in the following areas: 

  • Clackamas County 
    • On Tuesdays, The Salvation Army is providing lunch and dinner for community members in Estacada. 
       
  • Douglas County
    • Meal services are available for pick-up and delivery only. To sign up please call 503-313-3438. Clothing for evacuees is available at 2658 Stephen St. Roseburg, OR from 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Monday – Friday.  
       
  • Deschutes County
    • Feeding evacuees three times a day currently sheltered at a local hotel. 
       
  • Jackson County Expo at 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point, OR 97502. 
    • Feeding evacuees three times a day. The Salvation Army HOPE House at 1065 Crews Rd. Medford, Oregon 97501 is being used as a shelter for over 40 evacuees. 
       
  • Lane County
    • Feeding 75 firefighters working on the front lines twice a day. 
       
  • Linn and Benton Counties at the Linn Benton Fairgrounds at 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany, OR 97322.
    • Feeding evacuees three times a day. 
       
  • Lincoln County: 
    • Emergency food boxes are available in Newport at 140 NE 4th St, Newport, OR 97365 on Wednesday – Friday 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. They are also available in Lincoln City on Fridays from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM at The Lincoln City Church of Christ 2160 NE Quay Pl, Lincoln City, OR 97367. 
       
  • Marion County at the Oregon State Fairgrounds at 2330 17th St. NE, Salem, OR 97303. 
    • Meals are being delivered to local hotels in Salem and Woodburn for evacuees. 
       
  • Multnomah County 
    • Providing over 1,000 meals to houseless Portlanders every Monday in North and SE Portland.  

DONATIONS
The best way to help evacuees is to make a financial contribution. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of the disaster. 100% of your donation stays in Oregon to respond directly to the needs of those impacted by the Oregon Wildfires. There are a variety of ways the public can support The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts:
 

ONLINE
salarmy.us/oregon-wildfires
 

PHONE
Call 1-800-SAL-ARMY – Designate gift “Oregon Wildfire Relief”
 

MAIL
Designate “Oregon Wildfire Relief” on check and mail to:
The Salvation Army Disaster Relief
8495 SE Monterey Ave.
Happy Valley, OR 97086

# # # 
 

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Salvation Army relief teams still at work after Hurricane Sally

Army relief teams still at work after Hurricane Sally

The Salvation Army continues bringing relief to western Florida and southern Alabama after Hurricane Sally lumbered through the region last week, causing widespread flooding and power outages. The slow-moving storm dumped more than two feet of rain in the area before continuing inland.

In Florida, 12 canteens are feeding residents in Pensacola, and another one is operating in Panama City. The Salvation Army is partnering with Florida Southern Baptist Disaster Relief to provide food for 10,000 residents each day. The feeding operation is located at Hillcrest Baptist Church in Pensacola, along with the Army’s Incident Command Post. Along with the meals prepared by SBDR, Army disaster teams are distributing 20,000 fresh cold meals provided by Wholesome Kitchens.

As of today, The Salvation Army has provided 25,231 prepared meals, 16,966 drinks and 20,110 snacks. Spiritual and emotional care has been given to 328 individuals.

In Baldwin and Mobile counties in south Alabama, the Category 2 storm ravaged Baldwin and Mobile counties, bringing down trees and power lines, leaving many Baldwin County residents without utilities. Most of the residents have had their power restored, but complete restoration may not occur before next week. Seven canteens are serving in the area, and a 12-passenger van is delivering food. Thus far, 15,896 meals have been served, along with 8,000 drinks and 9,857 snacks. Also, shelter has been provided for 45 people.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama Serving Those Affected by Hurricane Sally

MOBILE, Ala. (September 21, 2020) – The Salvation Army is prepping canteens for today’s feedings to serve those affected by Hurricane Sally. An Incident Management Team and eight mobile feeding units have been deployed from all over the state to provide food, hydration, and spiritual care for those impacted by Hurricane Sally in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Service is being provided in Mobile, Gulf Shores, Orange Beach, and Foley. Each canteen can serve up to 1,500 meals per day and spiritual care is provided for many dealing with the emotional pain Sally has left behind. 

To date, The Salvation Army has provided the following throughout Coastal Alabama in response to Hurricane Sally:

Served meals – 14,277

Drinks – 6,926

Snacks – 10,464 

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available.  Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support.

The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation to the charity of your choice. Monetary contributions also support local economies and ensure that businesses can operate when relief supplies diminish. 

Mail: Mail checks to The Salvation Army, P.O. BOX 1959, Atlanta, GA 30301

Please designate ‘Hurricane Season 2020 Disaster Relief’ OR the specific name of disaster (i.e., Hurricane Laura, Hurricane Sally, etc.) on all checks. 

Online Donations: helpsalvationarmy.org 

Phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY 

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To support The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama, visit HelpSalvationArmy.org. For more information on how The Salvation Army is serving in Coastal Alabama, contact Captain Trey Jones at 251-438-1625.

About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

The new normal and the corps of today and tomorrow

The new normal and the corps of today and tomorrow

By: Brad Rowland

Six months after the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in the United States, Salvation Army leaders are looking ahead to how things must change as doors open to corps and administrative buildings across the USA Southern Territory. With that as the backdrop, a panel convened in mid-September, first recording a multi-part conversation for Soundcast’s Words of Life podcast to be released in October across all platforms. From there, a similar group came together for a live, streaming conversation via Zoom and Facebook, discussing the developments to this point and glancing at the takeaways that should arrive with an eye toward the future.

“We wanted to have these kinds of conversations in a public forum, in part because there are sometimes challenges in presenting best practices with each other,” said Bernie Dake, territorial director of communications. “It allows people to be able to communicate those things in a way that others can engage with whenever they choose, seeing people they trust and hearing what others are going through.”

Dake was joined in the public forum by an eight-member panel, representing different constituencies and intentionally diverse in its makeup.

  • Lieutenant Nicolas Arroqui, corps officer in Stillwater, Oklahoma
  • Captain Liz Blusiewicz, corps officer in Huntington, West Virginia
  • Chanhyung Chang, mission specialist for the Atlanta International Corps
  • Major Jerry Friday, territorial mission and cultural ministries secretary
  • Captain Malaika Good, divisional youth secretary for Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi
  • Lieutenant Chris Raymer, corps officer in Frederick, Maryland
  • Major Angela Repass, corps officer at Atlanta International
  • Jeremy Rowland, territorial sergeant major and CSM of the Gwinnett County, Georgia, Corps

The conversation, which can be seen below in its entirety, included numerous topics. The group began by discussing local reactions to COVID-19 in the early days of its impact, with a pivot to a discussion on the reality of mental and emotional challenges prompted by quarantine-driven isolation.

Major Friday noted the success of a telephone hotline, started in the Southern Territory, in providing hope and a listening ear.

“Our phones are ringing a lot more in the past six months than they were before,” said Lieutenant Raymer. “I count it a joy to be a listening ear for people to call.”

From there, countless stories were told of how The Salvation Army went to work, making the most of the situation and providing help and spiritual care to many.

“It was very organic for us,” said Captain Blusiewicz. “When crisis happens, that is who we are in The Salvation Army. We embody doing things and doing it in the name of Jesus, and it starts with discipleship and having that relationship with the Lord.

“Our soldiers started a sidewalk Sunday school, using materials from the Orange curriculum and some stuff from ministry toolkit … They would go out to our kids’ homes and to soldiers’ homes, taking as much or as little technology, and just play with the kids and be in the front yard. What we saw happening was everybody was looking at that yard saying, ‘What in the world is going on with the Salvation Army bus down there?’ and everyone would come out. It became a standard thing. Our soldiers would blitz communities, tell stories and then come back and do it again.”

There was an emphasis on collaboration and the sharing of resources, with Captain Good shedding light on the creation of “Church in a Box” and the overwhelmingly positive utility of The Salvation Army’s Ministry Toolkit. In addition, the notion that the pandemic prompted the Army to extend beyond its walls permeated the conversation.

“When we think of the church, this embodies what the church is,” Rowland said. “The building is not our church. The people are the church, so how are we engaging with the people who are in need and who are broken?

“My biggest concern is that we, as an army, think that getting back into the corps and into our traditional format is the end-all … We have to be extremely intentional. We can’t allow that comfort zone to stop us from reaching people. We have to be creative, engaging and intentional in sharing the gospel.”

There were questions posed about the future, acknowledging the relative uncertainty of what is to come. Still, the message was notably positive, with a charge to continue to prioritize ministry and to take advantage of the opportunities that have arisen from this challenging season.

“I think COVID has brought us into asking some of these questions of what really matters and what’s important,” Captain Blusiewicz said. “Where are the boundaries of ministry? And Jesus, where are you? Can I just grab your tassels because I want to be where you are? And I don’t think he’s in an empty chapel.”

“Our divisional commander told us, ‘Do not retreat. We’re in war, and this is not the time to retreat.’ To me, it’s mind-blowing and it causes us all to be fired up,” Lt. Arroqui said. “This is very encouraging to hear all that you’re doing, and a lot of us are doing so much in our community. A community that desperately needs us … That ‘do not retreat’ just keeps coming back in my mind. We need to reach out to people. We need to be responsible, too, but we need to share the hope that we have.”

Plans are in the works to deliver similar conversations on a monthly basis, with the intentionality to keep the conversation alive and to ensure the best deployment of the Army.

“It was a great conversation,” Dake said. “I’m inspired by the themes, ranging from the blitzing of the community to hearing the sentiment that we are in a war that we can’t retreat from during and after this time. I could feel the spirit of Salvationism bubbling up inside me and a charge to go make a difference.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Hope Is On The Way

Hope Is On The Way 

Salvation Army Disaster Services delivering 10,000 meals to communities in need. 

 

What              The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services will be serving 10,000 meals to communities still reeling in the wake of Hurricane Sally. Southern Baptist Disaster Relief will be preparing the meals. 

 

Who               The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services and Southern Baptist Disaster Relief. 

Why               With many communities still without power, families are struggling to put food on the table. The Salvation Army Disaster Services aims to provide food, hydration, and emotional care to underserved communities.

 

When             Sunday, September 20, 2020 

  • Lunch: 12 pm 
  • Dinner: 4 pm 

  

Where            Olive Baptist Church– 103 Winthrop Ave, Pensacola 32507 

                        *East Milton Elementary(lunch only)- 5156 Ward Basin Rd, Milton 

                        AMC– 161 East Nine Mile Rd, Pensacola 32507 

                        Brent Ball Park– Beverly Pkwy & West St, Pensacola 32505 

                        Point Church– 13801 Innerarity Point Rd, Pensacola 32507 

                        Equestrian Center– 7750 Mobile Hwy, Beulah 32526 

                        Seminole, AL– 32268 US Hwy 90, Seminole, AL 36574 

                        Century Industrial Pkwy– 6801 Industrial Century 32535 

                        *Emanual Baptist Church(dinner only)- 4187 Hwy 90, Pace, 32571 

Visuals          Disaster Services staff and volunteers serving from mobile kitchen units (canteens) to communities in need. 

Interviews and photo opportunities available upon request, contact Eric Anderson for details 

####

Eric Anderson,  Public Information Officer

The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services 

www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org

Cel: (239) 398-1009

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Meals For Milton Brings Hope To Residents Impacted By Hurricane Sally

Pensacola, FL (September 19, 2020) – The Salvation Army has deployed more than 10 mobile kitchens (canteens) from all over the state to provide food, hydration, and spiritual care for those still reeling from the impact of Sally in Pensacola Florida. Each canteen can serve up to 1,500 meals per day and spiritual care is provided for many dealing with the emotional pain Sally has left behind. 

One of those canteens arrived at East Milton Elementary school where nearly 500 meals were served to the local community. “It’s a blessing to be able to have a hot meal and not have to eat bread and lunch meat,” says Cynthia Grant, a local resident. Most homes in East Milton are still without power and are concerned Hurricane Sally is not done leaving her mark. “A lot of water, and it’s rising a lot!” Milton is bordering the Black River that continues to rise and is expected to crest on Sunday. 

“We are working alongside local officials and with the Emergency Management Center to identify the areas that are most in need,” says Steve Vick, Incident Commander for The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services in Pensacola. Within 24 hours of their arrival more than 4,200 meals and more than 4,500 waters have been provided to those in need. Bringing hope to communities like East Milton. 

“Thank you very very much. God is so good,” expresses Cynthia as she loads her vehicle with hot meals for her family of five. Clamshells were filled with Black beans, rice, and mixed vegetables, and a chocolate chip cookie. 

The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services will continue to serve up to 10,000 meals a day that are being prepared by Florida Southern Baptist at Hillcrest Baptist Church location in Pensacola, Florida. 

The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation to the charity of your choice. Monetary contributions also support local economies and ensure that businesses can operate when relief supplies diminish. 

Mail: Mail checks to The Salvation Army, P.O. BOX 1959, Atlanta, GA 30301

Please designate ‘Hurricane Season 2020 Disaster Relief’ OR the specific name of disaster (i.e., Hurricane Laura, Hurricane Sally, etc.) on all checks. 

Online: helpsalvationarmy.org 

Phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY 

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. 

About The Salvation Army 

The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood. 

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

The Salvation Army in Texas Prepared and Monitoring Tropical Storm Beta

Dallas, Texas (September 19, 2020) – The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster (EDS) teams in Texas are closely monitoring Tropical Storm Beta. Hurricane and tropical storm watches have been issued for the Texas coast, including areas still recovering from Hurricane Laura.

The projected storm track calls for the slow-moving system to make its way along the Texas coastline, posing a major threat of rainfall and flooding in Southeast Texas. Alvin Migues, Emergency Services Director for The Salvation Army said, “We have been in touch with The Salvation Army units in coastal locations, from Harlingen to Beaumont, requesting that they continue to monitor the storm and any local threat. Many of these disaster response teams have only recently returned home from multiple weeks of relief work in the Golden Triangle area after Hurricane Laura.”

In addition to a fleet of more than 35 mobile kitchens assigned year-round to locations in Texas, The Salvation Army also operates a 52-foot Field Kitchen. This unit has the capacity to produce between 15,000-20,000 meals per day and recently staged in Beaumont ready to support Hurricane Laura response efforts.

“The Salvation Army has an extensive network of trained staff, volunteers and Officers who are prepared to respond to disasters in Texas, and across the nation,” said Migues. “Our personnel and resources have been tested this summer, with ongoing large-scale response efforts to Hurricanes Hanna, Laura and Sally. The Salvation Army will continue to focus on the provision of meals and hydration to both first responders and affected communities, as well as emotional and spiritual care. Our committed staff and volunteers stand ready to respond when and where we are needed.”

For the latest information please go to www.disaster.salvationarmy.org and watch for regular updates on our social media pages at www.facebook.com/salvationarmytexas/ and www.twitter.com/salarmytx

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Salvation Army Canteens roll out to bring relief and support in Florida to areas affected by Hurricane Sally

(LUTZ, FL – September 18, 2020) — With floodwaters beginning to recede, ten Salvation Army mobile feeding units fully stocked and ready to serve have rolled out today in Pensacola and to other areas throughout the Panhandle.  

With power still out throughout the Pensacola area and the ability to locate food service or cook at home not possible, these mobile feeding units are a welcome sight for those in need.

In fact on Thursday night, Steve Vick, Pensacola Incident Commander, shared a story about how important our services are even when we don’t expect it.  When the canteens arrived at their hotel, there were people who needed to be fed and they were able to provide 50 meals to those at the hotel. 

While these mobile feeding units are equipped to cook hot meals on-site, COVID restrictions have limited that capability, but are still able to deliver shelf-stable meals and already prepared hot meals.

In fact, our partners, The Florida Baptists, who are utilizing a commercial kitchen located at the Hillcrest Baptist Church in Pensacola, were preparing a menu of black beans and rice with mixed vegetables for delivery today by those canteens for up to 10,000 meals a day. 

Major Ed Binnix, corps officer in Panama City is out the community again today feeding up to 500 meals and is also reaching out to several of the rural counties north of Panama City to evaluate any needs there. 

For the latest information on  The Salvation Army’s response to Hurricane Sally visit: www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org

To help The Salvation Army serve those who are being impacted by Hurricane Sally, visit: www.HelpSalvationArmy.org

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Mural near THQ helps tell The Salvation Army’s story to passersby

Mural near THQ helps tell The Salvation Army’s story to passersby

By: David Ibata

A mural depicting 130 years of Salvation Army history in New Zealand took artist Allan Wrath six hours to create at the Midland Division Youth Councils in 2019. Now that image, “Hope to Generations,” has jumped 8,200 miles to the United States to inspire a similar mural at Southern Territorial Headquarters in Georgia.

Commissioner Willis Howell, territorial commander, read about Wrath’s art-on-the-fly creation in the October 2019 issue of The War Cry for New Zealand, Fiji, Tonga and Samoa. He recommended the artwork to a committee taking suggestions for a wall of a Salvation Army-owned warehouse that faces the recently completed Peachtree Creek Greenway of the city of Brookhaven.

The new mural “highlights so many different aspects of service The Salvation Army is involved with,” said committee member Lt. Colonel Kathy Hobgood, assistant secretary for program and territorial overseas project officer. “It tells our story and shows our church, the Adult Rehabilitation Center, and our social services and camps.

“It’s not big enough to share everything, of course, but one of the comments made was because there’s so much there, maybe one time you’d pass by and notice one part, and the next time you’d walk by and see something fresh and say, ‘Wow, I didn’t know the Army did that.’”

Major Anne Westmoreland, project manager and divisional secretary for women’s ministries in the National Capital and Virginia Division, said, “We wanted to share a positive message and bring hope to the community. People were walking by every day, just looking at that blank wall. They may not have had any idea what was behind that wall – The Salvation Army – and why we do what we do.”

The warehouse, in the lower parking lot of THQ, offered a blank white canvas 55 feet wide by 25 feet tall. THQ put out a call for mural ideas last fall, and 10 proposals were received from four individuals (some accompany this story). In the end, the decision was made to go with an image inspired by Wrath’s.

Adriana Li Mandri, multi-media ministries editor, and Cheryl Werner, territorial graphic arts director, executed the artwork and handed it off to Cecil Sellers.

Sellers is a soldier at the Lawrenceville, Georgia, Corps and owner of A Better Sign LLC, a maker of signs and banners. He had the image transferred to 41 aluminum-covered plastic panels, each measuring 4 by 8 feet, that were then attached to the corrugated-steel side of the warehouse.

The mural was to have been unveiled at the Call to Mission: Southern Territorial Congress in June. The COVID-19 pandemic forced postponement of the congress, but the mural project proceeded, and the artwork was installed in early September.

It lists The Salvation Army’s core values: Passionate, Trustworthy, Uplifting, Compassionate and Brave. It displays the word “love” in different languages, reflecting the Army’s outreach to multi-ethnic communities. It depicts a red kettle, a mobile feeding unit (canteen), brass musical instruments and a box of toys.

“Hope, love and grace; a helping hand, a listening ear; soup, soap and salvation; a hopeful tune; the Word of God – these are just some of the messages shared through the mural. Messages of hope, of inspiration, of new beginnings; and of helping hands, a helping Army that is doing the most good,’” Major Westmoreland said.

Lt. Colonel Hobgood said the mural is important because it communicates to people passing by what The Salvation Army is all about. “It gives an opportunity for the community to see that The Salvation Army is here. You see our sign out front, but this mural hopefully will help us tell our story.”

Photos of THQ Mural (seen above) by: Jon Avery, media ministries editor, THQ.

Mural candidates were submitted by:

– Captain Whitney Houston, corps officer, Denton, Texas.

– Major Tim Farrell, administrator, Adult Rehabilitation Center, Tampa, Fla.

– Lieutenant Bailey Partain Lind, Kroc Center Officer for Congregational Life, Memphis Tenn.

– Sharon Robinson, Arkansas-Oklahoma Division.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Army offering services in flooded Florida Panhandle

Army offering services in flooded Florida Panhandle

Salvation Army disaster relief teams are serving food and beverages in the Florida Panhandle after slow-moving Hurricane Sally made landfall Wednesday morning, dumping more than two feet of rain in the area and causing severe flooding and power outages.

Twelve canteens from the Florida Division are providing service in Pensacola, as well as in Panama City and Fort Walton Beach. Also, the Arkansas-Oklahoma Division has dispatched five canteens from Bartlesville, Lawton and Tulsa, Oklahoma, as well as from Fayetteville and Fort Smith, Arkansas. AOK also sent crews from Chickasha and Oklahoma City to serve in the relief effort. The Kentucky-Tennessee Division’s Clarksville, Tennessee, canteen has also joined in the relief effort.

More than 200,000 residents in and around Pensacola are without power, and flooding has forced the closing of sectors of Interstate 10, the major east-west artery in the Florida Panhandle and Gulf Coast area.

The Salvation Army is partnering with Florida Southern Baptist Disaster Relief to provide up to 12,000 meals a day at the Hillcrest Baptist Church in Pensacola. SBDR is doing the meal preparation, and the Army is handling distribution of the food.

The best way to support The Salvation Army’s disaster relief effort is through financial donations. Checks may be mailed to The Salvation Army, P.O. Box 1959, Atlanta, GA 30301 and should be designated Hurricane Season 2020 Disaster Relief or the name of the hurricane. Online donations may be made at helpsalvationarmy.org, and phone donations may be made at 1-800-SAL-ARMY.

Source: southernspiritonline.org