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Making music possible: Plastic horns offer affordable alternative

Making music possible: Plastic horns offer affordable alternative

By: David Ibata

Credit for suggesting an affordable way to let 40 children have their own musical instrument at The Salvation Army in Rome, Georgia, goes to Mia Means, a high school freshman and corps cadet who helps teach music to younger kids.

“Before, we were using regular cornets,” Mia said, “and I was talking to Captain (Jason) Smith about how the cornets were getting scratched and banged up. I was like, why don’t we get plastic trumpets, captain?”

Plastic? No, it’s not a toy. A “pTrumpet” is the real thing, with a brass-type cupped mouthpiece and the working valves and fingerings of a conventional B-flat brass instrument. Manufactured for school use by Warwick Music Ltd. of the United Kingdom, it’s lighter than a metal instrument and available in a wild variety of colors – red, blue, green, yellow and white.

“I had experience with them from school, from the sixth grade,” Mia said. “Captain Smith looked into it, and eventually we got them. They’re so much better because they’re cheaper than regular trumpets, and they play the exact same way and sound exactly the same. Sometimes, on Sunday mornings, I’ll play a plastic trumpet in church to show kids they can do this, too – it’s not hard.”

The Rome Corps Women’s Auxiliary provided a $3,000 grant, and a private donor, $1,000, to pay for the instruments, Captain Smith said. The corps bought 20 pTrumpets and 20 “pBuzz” horns – the latter, a simpler plastic instrument for prekindergarten children. Rather than valves, the pBuzz has a sliding bore like a trombone to change pitch.

“The Trade Department of the Eastern Territory sells them,” said Captain Smith, who with his wife Captain Melissa are corps officers in Rome. “Each horn is played by the principal trumpet player of the New York Staff Band to ensure its quality. Each trumpet comes with a note from the Staff Band saying it meets their standards.”

What are the advantages? “Of course, they’re cheaper – about $125 each as opposed to $500 to $600 for a (metal) cornet or trumpet,” Captain Jason said. “They’re low maintenance. They’re plastic, which means they can handle younger kids who sometimes drop them or ding them on a chair.

“And because of the cost, we can now ensure every one of our music participants has their own horn. Before, they had to share horns, and we had to sanitize the mouthpieces between groups. Now we’re able to issue each child their own instrument.”

Nicholas Simmons-Smith, territorial music secretary, said that his own corps is thinking of purchasing 15 of the instruments and has gotten samples to try out.

At his corps, Simmons-Smith said, “and I am sure for Rome, we have a lot of community kids in our program who need a horn that doesn’t cost a lot and can be dropped and not damaged. These are great horns for beginners, and in this financial climate, very suitable for corps programs.”

Children come to Rome Corps on Monday evenings during the school year for Moonbeams, Sunbeams, Girl Guards and Adventure Corps. They’re served dinner, have a character-building time, and then break up for music. Women’s Auxiliary President Laura Martin, a retired music teacher, takes the pre-K boys and girls, the Moonbeams, and Captain Jason and Mia work with the older kids.

The p-instruments arrived in February and were immediately put to use. The corps plans to start the youngest children on the pBuzz and, after kindergarten, move them on to music theory and pTrumpets and, ultimately, conventional brass instruments like cornets and baritones.

Captain Jason said, “Our hope is our children will be able to feed into the junior music conservatory program at Camp Grandview,” the Georgia Division overnight camp, “and help children in the city and county schools decide if they want to be in a school band program in the sixth grade.”

Captains Smith came to Rome about three years ago and have grown the Monday night children’s program from about eight youngsters initially to an average of 40 currently.

“We’re hoping to see the program grow,” Captain Jason said. “We’re kind of at capacity now with our building and transportation, but we’d love to see this grow into a really robust conservatory program that can be held throughout the year.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

The Salvation Army Serving Hope in Storm Damaged Areas

Hamilton, MS (April 18, 2019)—After a tornado struck the area surrounding Hamilton, MS, it was The Salvation Army that came to help serve affected residents and to aid the first responders in the days that followed. A meal or a bottle of water can often provide a considerable amount of emotional and mental comfort to those who have encountered stressful situations such as natural disasters. And, offering emotional support or spiritual care can help people in hard-hit communities find stability in the wake of a storm.

Severe weather continues to threaten the area and The Salvation Army will be prepared to serve as needed after the storms pass. According to Lieutenant Christian Smith, Columbus Salvation Army Corps Officer, they were able to continue operations until noon on April 18th but had to secure their temporary distribution area as the new round of storms entered the area. “We then plan to resume operations tomorrow and through the weekend,” he says.

That service will continue to include meals, water, snacks, clean-up kits, and emotional and spiritual care. To date The Salvation Army has provided 240 meals, 320 snacks, 314 drinks, 86 clean-up kits, 86 hygiene kits, 25 tarps, 40 cases of water, 5 sets of infant supplies and 13 boxes of food. This is in addition to the 44 individuals who have received emotional and spiritual care. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, go to helpsalvationarmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Do not be afraid: A message for Easter from General Brian Peddle

Do not be afraid: A message for Easter from General Brian Peddle

What causes you to be afraid? Is it the dark? Spiders? Illness, heights, confined spaces, money problems or the future? A myriad of things are understandable causes of fear, and often that fear is accompanied by anxiety. There is a recurring theme throughout Scripture where God tells us not to be afraid.

At Christmas we noted the words from the angel Gabriel to Mary as she was told she would be the mother of Jesus: “Do not be afraid” (Luke 1:30). Remember that according to the Bible, angels are not quite the same as the helpless, beatific, tinsel-adorned young girls and boys who portray them in nativity plays – Psalm 103:20 describes them as “mighty.” The shepherds were comforted by the same phrase with the appearance of an angelic host (Luke 2:10). In Matthew’s account of the Resurrection morning, the first words of the angel at the tomb are: “Do not be afraid” (28:5). Just a few verses later, the women meet Jesus and his first words are: “Do not be afraid” (v. 10).

The Old Testament addresses the same issue as Joshua is about to succeed Moses. We read Moses’ encouraging words in Deuteronomy 31:8: The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged. There is also the promise from God in Isaiah 43:1: Do not fear, for I have redeemed you; I have summoned you by name; you are mine. And at the end of the New Testament, as John sees Jesus in his vision and falls at his feet, Jesus again says: “Do not be afraid” (Revelation 1:17).

So we see that throughout Scripture God says to us: “Do not be afraid.” In the life of Christ, even from the foretelling of his birth, to the announcement of the same, to that first Easter morning, we hear those same words: “Do not be afraid.” It seems clear to me that God is inviting us to move from a place of fear to a position where we implicitly trust this “immeasurably more” God who never fails.

These words from God are not just trite advice. For those who know God and share life with him, there is no need to be afraid because God has overcome the world (John 16:33), defeated sin on the Cross and conquered death – as revealed by the empty tomb! We need to remember this when fear takes hold of us.

God is not a distant, powerful deity; he is an ever-present God who seeks to live with and in his people. We need to couple the instruction of “Do not be afraid” with the recurring promise we read before: “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” When fear takes hold, we should remember not only the omnipotence – all-powerfulness – of God; we should remember that he is right with us, beside us and in us. God’s perfect love drives out fear (1 John 4:18).

What is happening in your world and in your life this Easter?

Anyone who is struggling with sin and recurring cycles of behavior that they feel unable to break can choose not to be afraid, but to trust in the God who broke the power of sin on the Cross. Anyone who is facing significant challenges in life within the family, at work or with health, for example, can choose not to be afraid, but to trust in the God for whom nothing is impossible. Anyone who is experiencing grief and loss can choose not to be afraid, but to trust in the God who conquered death and promises eternal life.

So, this Eastertide, do not be afraid. Remember – God is with you. Do not be afraid. Remember – God is bigger than the situation you are facing. Do not be afraid. Our God is victorious, and he invites us to share in his victory!

Scripture quotations from the New International Version

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Salvation Army Columbus Corps Continues to Serve Tornado Survivors

After the tornado that struck Hamilton, MS on Saturday, April 13th first responders entered the area to provide aid to those affected by the storm. The Salvation Army was there as well to assist in recovery efforts. In the days that have followed, The Salvation Army has served this hard-hit community with material aid and spiritual comfort.

According to Lieutenant Christian Smith, Columbus Salvation Army Corps Officer, they are keeping an eye on forecasts of more severe weather coming through the area on Thursday, which may require a temporary hold on service delivery. However, The Salvation Army plans to continue serving the affected community before and after any new storms that may come through. “We’re going to get as much aid out there as possible before the storms hit,” said Lt. Smith. 

The Salvation Army will continue to serve the area as the need continues. A multi-agency distribution site was set up at the Hamilton Baptist Church. This distribution site will remain open through the weekend, to ensure they can meet the needs of the community.

To date, The Salvation Army has provided 240 meals, 306 snacks, 294 drinks, 73 clean-up kits, 73 hygiene kits, 13 food boxes, 30 tarps, 8 infant supplies, and 101 cases of water to tornado survivors and first responders in Mississippi and Alabama in response to the tornadoes that struck over the weekend of April 13-14, 2019. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, go to helpsalvationarmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

Greenville Kroc Center land swap paves way for tennis expansion

Greenville Kroc Center land swap paves way for tennis expansion

By: David Ibata

The Salvation Army in Greenville, South Carolina, has reached an agreement with the city to exchange land, opening the way to an expansion of the local Kroc Center’s renowned tennis center.

“Downtown Greenville is growing tremendously, and it’s very difficult to find available property in the city,” said Steve Cook, director of The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center in Greenville. “For us to identify and acquire property next to the Kroc Center is a tremendous benefit to The Salvation Army. It allows us to grow our program and impact more individuals in the community.”

The Kroc Center, operator of the tennis facility, opened in 2011 on the former site of a Baptist church. The church had swapped its land for the former Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club about a half-mile away. The club moved into the Kroc Center, and the church moved into the former club building. The Army retained two land parcels totaling 20 acres next to the church.

Fast-forward to 2019: The city of Greenville needs about four acres of The Salvation Army’s land holdings next to the Baptist church for its new Unity Park. It has offered to exchange 1.3 acres of city-owned property next to the tennis center.

That, and a quarter-acre tract recently acquired by the Army in a separate transaction, will make possible six new tennis courts in addition to the 16 courts plus stadium court already in play. The tennis center has more than 700 members, serves 600 school children ages 5 to 18 each year, and operates the largest United States Tennis Association adult league program in the state.

Major Pete Costas, Greenville area commander, said the tennis expansion land is under contract, and it will be about two years before The Salvation Army can take possession – until a sewer project that runs beneath the site is finished. That gives the Army time for a fundraising campaign that may launch early next year. The new courts are estimated to cost $700,000.

As for the parcel The Salvation Army is giving to the city, Major Costas said, “the land is vacant. In fact, it’s floodzone property, so it’s really limited what could be constructed on it, but it would meet city codes for a parking lot and sports fields.”

Greenville’s Unity Park is a $40 million project planned for 60 acres on the west side of Greenville.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Ready to Serve when Tornado Hits Close to Home

The motto “Be Prepared” took on a new meaning for Salvation Army Lieutenant Alphonso Hughes this past weekend. Most days you will find Lt. Hughes in northern Virginia, where he serves as an assistant at The Salvation Army Alexandria Corps, but last week a family emergency called him home to Columbus, Mississippi. Late Saturday evening, April 13, as tornadoes hit a couple of towns over in Monroe County, Lt. Hughes was in contact with the Columbus Corps to see what help he could provide to their staff and volunteers. “I knew their lieutenant was at women’s retreat, so I wanted to help. It happened really fast and we were told to ‘just go!’” explained Lt. Hughes.

While he and youth evangelism and outreach director, Melvin Franklin, could not get the mobile feeding unit into storm ravaged neighborhoods, they were able to set up a distribution site. They selected a location that was easily accessible to first responders and members of the community. In addition to providing water and snacks, neighbors came by with donations such as tarps that could be distributed to those in need.

By Monday morning, all local officers were back on the job and an EOC was established. Even though Lt. Hughes was not needed on the front lines, he came back to the Corps to help make sandwiches and pack supplies. “You never know when you are going to be called to God’s service. This reminds me to always be ready,” shared Lt. Hughes. “Even when I was going through personal worries for the issues my family is facing unrelated to the storm, God provided me an opportunity to step outside of that and share his love with other people.”

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source: disaster.salvationarmyusa.org 

The Salvation Army providing services to refugees in Texas

The Salvation Army providing services to refugees in Texas

By: Philip Burn

At the request of the city of McAllen, Texas, The Salvation Army has been providing emergency overnight shelter, food and other services to around 100 refugees per night. Individuals and families coming to the Army had been successfully vetted and processed at the border and were awaiting transportation to approved locations in the U.S.

Since 2014, The Salvation Army in McAllen has worked closely with Catholic Charities, providing up to 400 meals a week to their Respite Centers for individuals who have been processed at the U.S. border. Recently, Catholic Charities and other non-profits in the city have been overwhelmed by the sheer number of people being admitted at the border, resulting in the emergency request for additional assistance from The Salvation Army.

The week of March 24, Catholic Charities requested that The Salvation Army provide 900 meals per day – a figure that was expected to rise to 1,500 a day the first week of April. These meals were in addition to dinner and breakfast for 100 people staying in a temporary shelter in the Army’s banquet hall.

“They come in with clothing that’s been worn for maybe several months, shoes that have been through water many, many times, and they haven’t had shelter in a long time,” Major Brett Meredith, Texas divisional business secretary, told an NPR reporter.

The Emergency Disaster Services team from Denton County in North Texas deployed to McAllen, and additional teams were being recruited to assist. The Salvation Army also was working with partner churches in south Texas to provide support to local staff and volunteers.

“This is the very first time that The Salvation Army here in Hidalgo County has had to house refugees to help with the overflow,” said Captain Stephen Correira, commanding officer in McAllen. “We serve in the name of Jesus Christ (for) suffering humanity, and we serve without discrimination.”

Buses transporting refugees were arriving at The Salvation Army around 5 p.m. daily. Dinner was served, and staff and volunteers worked to make the guests, including children and babies, as comfortable as possible.

Shower facilities and hygiene products were made available and were greatly appreciated by those staying in the shelter. After breakfast the next morning, the buses were loaded, and the daily clean-up and set-up began again in preparation for afternoon arrivals.

The week of March 19-26, the McAllen Salvation Army provided shelter to 714 refugees and was prepared to serve in this way for as long as needed. Additionally, The Salvation Army has had a mobile shower unit stationed at the Catholic Charities Respite Center since mid-February.

Meanwhile, in the Western Territory, the city of Yuma, Arizona, requested The Salvation Army’s help on March 28 providing food and shelter to migrant families in need who have permission to travel in the U.S. and were awaiting transport to their final host destinations. The Army in Yuma can feed and shelter up to 300 people per day.

Officials in Yuma noted a need for donations of non-perishable food, bottled water, snacks, clothing, hygiene items, sanitary wipes, laundry detergent and bath towels; baby formula, bottles, pacifiers and disposable diapers; and, for young children, stuffed animals and craft items like pencils, crayons and paper. Monetary donations also were welcome.

You can support the ongoing humanitarian efforts of The Salvation Army by making a financial donation at www.salvationarmytexas.org/mcallen.

Philip Burn is the divisional communications director for the Texas Division.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Singing songs of hope for besieged spirits

Singing songs of hope for besieged spirits

By: Nick Simmons-Smith

The issue of mental health awareness has been growing steadily over recent years as more and more people – some in the spotlight of Hollywood or in professional sport – have opened up about the causes and effects of depression, anxiety, loneliness and suicidal thoughts.

I myself have felt a greater awareness of mental health issues with the various musicians and artists that I work with throughout the year. It appears that the results of increased social media interaction have enabled people to “tell their story” but also caused them greater anxiety and introspection as they put themselves in the vulnerable position of receiving comments (not always positive, sometimes abusive) on social media platforms like Facebook or Twitter. Salvationists are, of course, not immune to these issues.

It was with this growing awareness of how many people were affected by mental health issues that I wrote a new piece of music for the Southern Territorial Band. “Songs of Hope” was intended to give comfort to those that walk through particularly dark and difficult days. The composition will be performed in Saturday evening’s program on Commissioning Weekend.

As Christians, we are occasionally guilty of simply saying “Jesus is the answer!” in response to someone’s problems. That response is true, but it does not fully empathize with the fact that a person may be fighting a desperate battle that may move them to consider ending their own life – because obstacles seem insurmountable and life itself appears completely overwhelming.

I have met extremely talented, bright, energetic young people who appear to have “it all together” contemplate suicide because of problems at school and home. It’s hard to comprehend this growing phenomenon – but it is real.

The songs featured in this major work include “On Christ the Solid Rock I Stand,” “Don’t Despair,” “Cornerstone,” and Joy Webb’s “There Will Be God”:

Man walks alone amidst uncertainty,
Only one thing can still make him strong;
In the pain, in the doubt, in the loneliness,
In the struggle of right against wrong;
Somewhere amidst the confusion,
There will be hope, there will be love,
There will be God.

On the two occasions that the band has performed this piece I have spoken with many people who have been affected by mental health issues, and they have been glad that this piece has brought light to this difficult subject.

I have been affected by suicide in my own family, and even after nearly 30 years I still cannot fully understand how and why certain things happen. We don’t tend to talk about these things very often, which is why I hope this positive – not morose – piece of music will give people renewed hope as they battle their own struggles, and comfort that they are not alone.

“Songs of Hope” starts and finishes with the inspirational words of SASB #550:

There is a hope that lifts my weary head,
A consolation strong against despair,
That when the world has plunged me in its deepest
pit, I find the Savior there!
Through present sufferings, future’s fear,
He whispers ‘courage’ in my ear.
For I am safe in everlasting arms,
And they will lead me home.

Nicholas Simmons-Smith is the territorial music secretary and bandmaster of the Southern Territorial Band.

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Known for innovating, some Kroc Centers are renovating

Known for innovating, some Kroc Centers are renovating

By: David Ibata

The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers across the Southern Territory have been open five to 10 years. So now that everyone knows what a Kroc Center is – and how it best serves its particular community – it’s time for some to take hammer and paint brush and freshen things up.

“When the Kroc Centers were being developed, it was all speculation what would be good programming, and what each location’s citizens would want,” said Steven Carpenter, territorial Kroc operations director. “Now that they’ve been open for a while, one can easily determine if people are really using the space for what it was intended. If programs are doing well, how can we expand them?”

Or if some space isn’t working out, how can it be re-purposed?

“We thought it would be a good idea to have full service cafés” Carpenter said. “What we found was that there’s a very slim margin of error allowed in the restaurant industry.”

Put another way – the cafes were losing money.

“The four pillars of a Kroc Center are arts, education, recreation and worship. Cafes are not a critical part of that mission. Five of our Kroc Centers have stopped doing cafes and are reimagining what those areas might be.”

Technology also drives change.

“We’re developing and implementing new membership software that has the ability to use iPads and mobile devices,” Carpenter said. “That frees up having to have everything at a stationary unit or desk for people checking in or signing up for things.”

Here’s how Kroc Centers in Augusta, Georgia; Memphis, Tennessee; and Kerrville, Texas, are responding to changing times.

Cafe too costly to operate? Time to change the menu

The Café on the Canal in Augusta, popular though it was with the general public, “was not a sustainable model for the Kroc Center,” said Captain Philip Canning, Augusta area commander.

The café closed in April 2018. A company that services the center’s vending machines, A&A Vending, suggested a concept it had introduced to employee break rooms and corporate dining rooms: The Micro Market.

“They’re small cafes with prepared food and snack items and drinks, with fresh salads and freshly made sandwiches that individuals can purchase,” Captain Canning said. “Nobody mans the store. It’s all self-serve. You go to a kiosk, scan an item’s bar code, and create your own account or pay directly.”

The Micro Market opened last fall and is one of the first things you see when you enter the building. It takes up about 15 feet of wall space. Upgrades were minimal: more electrical outlets, 220-volt service, a water line for a coffee and hot cocoa machine, and some tables and chairs borrowed from the banquet hall to seat 16 people.

Yes, there have been instances where people walked off without paying. That’s why the Micro Market has security cameras. And at a Kroc Center, everybody knows everyone.

“Shrinkage has been smaller than any of us imagined,” Captain Canning said. “We’re pretty pleased, and so is the vendor. … It’s a win-win situation. We have a food option for people coming into the Kroc Center, and we’re making money instead of losing money.”

Meanwhile, exciting things are happening in Augusta. The U.S. Department of Defense is moving the U.S. Army Cyber Command to Fort Gordon, and affiliated high-tech firms are relocating to the area.

The Kroc Center is on the Augusta Canal, across from two textile mills dating to the late 19th century and closed since the 1990s. They’re notable for the historic chimney of a Civil War-era powder works that once stood on the site. One mill is being turned into a cyber community with more than 100,000 square feet of corporate offices. The other is being turned into a mixed-use, live-work-play development with residences, retailing and restaurants.

“We’re expecting an influx of several thousand workers on a daily basis, and the Kroc Center is the closest thing to them,” Captain Canning said. “That will offer opportunities for us to form partnerships with them to use our facilities, generate additional revenues and help us to fulfill our mission.”

Possibly the next big capital project: A footbridge to make it more convenient to cross the canal from the mills to the Kroc. That’s likely to be a public investment by the city or county. “We have seen the schematics for it … but it’s kind of last priority right now,” Captain Canning said.

Reallocating space better serves families and children

The Kroc Center in Memphis is spending $250,000 on the first and second levels of its AutoZone Challenge Center to better accommodate children and family programs, while also updating its front desk space, known as the Welcome Center. “This is totally in response to community demand,” said Cleo Griffin, executive director.

The AutoZone Center, sponsored by its namesake auto parts firm, will become the hub of the Child Reach after-school program for youth 10 to 17 years – a much-appreciated service, as there are two schools next door. It also will house Child Watch, a drop-in benefit for members with kids three months to nine years old; children can stay up to two hours a day in a safe, supervised setting while Mom or Dad work out.

“What’s different about our Kroc Center is our worship department is over these operational areas, so they’re also home to summer camp and Bible Study camp,” Griffin said. There are 180 youngsters in the after-school program, 50 to 60 children per shift in Child Watch, and 600 to 700 day campers per session in the summer.

“We’re re-purposing the space to make more room for our worship, after-school and youth programming,” Griffin said. “There’s been demand for more square footage for these programs really since we opened. We’ve finally put ourselves in a position where we can make an investment into reallocating space to give these programs the square footage they need to continue to grow.”

Child Watch check-in and services will be on the first floor of the Challenge Center; and Kroc Reach check-in and services, on the second floor. (The third floor of the Challenge Center remains an adult work-out area with cardio and group training stations for extended fitness programs.) The Welcome Center, meanwhile, will be redone with multiple transaction stations, including two self-service kiosks.

“We’re getting new furniture and basically trying to create an area that’s more comfortable, and that gives members and potential members more transactional options … where people can sign up for memberships, swim lessons, or camp or youth basketball or soccer leagues,” Griffin said.

Playing to your strengths: Water park gets new slide

The outdoor water park has always been one of the more popular features of the Kroc Center in Kerrville. It offers two heated pools, a shallow water park play area for young children, and for older swimmers, high tower water slides – the original open slide, and a new, even larger, enclosed one.

“After eight years, our community has seen a lot of what we’ve done, and it was time to give them something new,” said Molly Putman, director of operations for the Kerrville Kroc. “It was time to update our outdoor aquatic park.”

The new slide is a bright blue and neon green, stands 19½ feet tall and 97½ feet long, and has water flowing inside at a rate of 300 to 500 gallons of water a minute. Space had been reserved for a second slide since the water park was built, and plumbing was already in place.

It was part of some $180,000 in capital upgrades completed last year. The original water slide was resurfaced and repainted from red to blue. Two giant ceiling fans, 12 feet in diameter, were installed in the fitness center to improve air circulation and reduce summer cooling costs.

Also, The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club at the Kroc got a permanent sign-in space. “Before, they had a table in the hallway,” Putnam said. “We cut a hole in an existing wall and created an enclosed front desk in a former coat closet.”

Additionally, Kerrville updated its audio-visual systems with new digital projectors, screens and flat-panel televisions. Putnam said, “We’re seeing some increase in rental revenues because we’re able to meet the needs of presenters and groups coming in. We can now accommodate HDMI and Mac computers, which we had trouble accommodating before; technology has changed over the years.”

A Lowe’s home improvement center provided a grant to help pay for materials, and 15 of its employees donated their labor to build the Boys & Girls Club desk, picnic tables and backpack racks. Bilbro Systems, an A/V contractor, installed the new audio-visual gear at no cost to the Kroc Center.

All this work is with an eye toward the Kroc Centers’ ultimate mission.

Carpenter said, “With The Salvation Army, what’s most important is that the types of programs offered attract people so you can implement The Salvation Army’s mission of WHY: to present the gospel of Jesus Christ to as many people as possible.”

Source: southernspiritonline.org

Appointments Announcement

Appointments Announcement | April 9, 2019

Southern Territorial Leadership announced the following appointments, in a special bulletin released this morning:

Effective June 17

Lt. Colonel Carolee Israel: Divisional Commander – Maryland & West Virginia Division

Lt. Colonel Allan Hofer: Divisional Commander – Arkansas & Oklahoma Division
Lt. Colonel Fiona Hofer: Divisional Director of Women’s Ministries, Director of Officer Development – Arkansas & Oklahoma Division

Lt. Colonel Sheila Lanier: Retiring September 1, 2019

Major Steve Morris: Territorial Secretary for Personnel (effective 9/1/19, with status of “Designate” between 6/17/19 and 8/31/19), with the rank of Lt. Colonel
Major Wendy Morris – Territorial Secretary for Officer Development, with the rank of Lt. Colonel

Major Jim Arrowood: Divisional Commander – North & South Carolinas Division, with the rank of Lt. Colonel
Major Linda Arrowood: Divisional Director of Women’s Ministries, Director of Officer Development – North & South Carolinas Division, with the rank of Lt. Colonel

Major Art Penhale: Divisional Commander – Kentucky & Tennessee Division
Major Ann Penhale: Divisional Director of Women’s Ministries, Director of Officer Development – Kentucky & Tennessee Division

Major Kent Davis: Divisional Commander – Alabama, Louisiana & Mississippi Division
Major Melody Davis: Divisional Director of Women’s Ministries, Director of Officer Development – Alabama, Louisiana & Mississippi Division

Majors Lewis & Jacqulyn Reckline: To be announced

Please be in prayer as these officers prepare to take up their new appointment responsibilities.

Issued by Commissioner Willis Howell

Source: southernspiritonline.org