Team Rubicon and The Salvation Army Partner to Continue Rebuilding After Irma

Team Rubicon and The Salvation Army Announce Partnership to Rebuild Homes and Lives in Collier County

The organizations will work together to rebuild 30 homes damaged by Hurricane Irma

Naples, FL (September 19, 2018)  Team Rubicon, a veteran-led disaster response organization, and The Salvation Army officially kicked off their partnership to help rebuild lives and homes that were impacted by Hurricane Irma. Over the next year, as part of Team Rubicon’s South Florida Rebuild Program, the two organizations will work together to identify and rebuild 30 homes damaged by Hurricane Irma in Collier County, Florida.

For its piece of the partnership, The Salvation Army will identify homes that meet established criteria for assistance as well as handle client services and case management. Team Rubicon, led by the military veterans of Cohort 8 of their Clay Hunt Fellows Program, will manage the construction and rebuild of these 30 homes.

“The Salvation Army has a long history of providing disaster relief and recovery around the world,” says Ashley Jones, Director of Social Services and Disaster Recovery for The Salvation Army. “Although it has now been one year since Hurricane Irma impacted Collier County, so many of our residents continue to rebuild. We are proud to partner with Team Rubicon in an effort to make sure all those in the community who need help receive it.”

In March 2018, Team Rubicon launched its home rebuild pilot program in Houston, Texas to support long-term recovery in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. This South Florida Home Rebuild Program will be built on the success and lessons learned from the Houston pilot.

“Team Rubicon is excited to launch this Home Rebuild Program in South Florida and for the opportunity to help get families impacted by Hurricane Irma back to a sense of pre-storm normalcy,” said David Venables, Deputy Director of Rebuild at Team Rubicon. “It’s a privilege to partner with The Salvation Army on this project. This organization brings deep community ties, resources and know-how that will help us rebuild homes and lives in South Florida.”

The launch of this program in South Florida marks a return to Collier County for Team Rubicon. Soon after Hurricane Irma made landfall as a Category 4 storm, Team Rubicon launched a response operation to provide immediate disaster relief. Now, the organization is returning to Collier County to address on-going, long-term recovery needs in impacted communities.

Team Rubicon boasts an 80,000-strong, highly-skilled volunteer force that helps communities stabilize and recover after a disaster. Since its 2010 inception, Team Rubicon has responded to over 285 disasters, including Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria.

About Team Rubicon

Team Rubicon unites the skills and experiences of military veterans with first responders to rapidly deploy emergency response teams. Team Rubicon is a nonprofit organization offering veterans a chance to continue their service by helping those afflicted by disasters, and also themselves. Programs and services are made possible by the support of individual donors, corporate partners, and the dedication of volunteers across the country. To join or support Team Rubicon’s mission, visit www.teamrubiconusa.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The Salvation Army A Shelter in the Storm for SC Community

CONWAY, SC (September 19, 2018) – A line of U-Haul trucks snaked their way into the little residential community called Rosewood, S.C., joining the other U-hauls already backed into numerous driveways along the cozy winding streets. Rosewood’s residents saw what rising flood waters did to their homes during Hurricane Matthew two years ago, and were taking preemptive action against the same rising rivers due to Hurricane Florence.

Adult residents rallied the youth into bands that roamed the neighborhoods giving an abundance of helping hands to friends and neighbors moving furniture and valuables into their rented U-Haul trucks. All the while­, a Salvation Army canteen was parked in the midst of the buzz of neighborhood activity handing out water and hot meals to those working to save what they could of their community life.

“My bishop told me you guys were here and I came running,” says one of the residents who asked to remain un-named. “We have a family of six and we need these meals.”

Her family lost everything during Hurricane Matthew. Two years later, after failed attempts to secure governmental and other funding to repair their home, their bank accounts were drained and they were dependent on help from friends and their church. “Since Matthew flooded our home, we spent everything on an apartment and house repairs,” she says, “The drywall is up, but it’s not finished, we don’t have all our electrical outlets yet, and we are using blankets for curtains.”

They moved back to the Rosewood community in July looking forward to picking up the pieces of their lives and getting settled back into a normal life. Her main concern now is for the kids. “It’s just not fair,” she said, “We spent everything to get back into our house, now it’s happening again – we just want to shelter the kids from the fear and memories of what happened during Matthew.”

While every disaster is unique and creates its own special needs, the core of The Salvation Army’s disaster program addresses many of the typical needs of a disaster survivor, but it is also flexible.  Services are adapted to the specific needs of individuals and communities and scalable according to the magnitude of the disaster.

“We tried to get help from many places during Matthew, but the only people that helped us was The Salvation Army,” she said. “You did what you said you’d do and fulfilled your promises then, and we are so very, very grateful that you are here now. You guys are our shelter in these storms.”

How to Help
The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors as the situation continues to be assessed. 

Online: helpsalvationarmy.org

Donate by phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY

Mail checks to: The Salvation Army, P.O. BOX 1959, Atlanta, GA 30301

Please designate ‘2018 Hurricane Season – Florence’ on all checks.

To receive a donation link via text: Text STORM to 51555

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Unable to Work but Able to Serve

Washington, NC (September 18, 2018) – While many of us would welcome the opportunity for a day off, Edwina Barrera in Washington, N.C. kept on working even though Hurricane Florence forced her to take five days off at her usual place of employment, the highways that crisscross the southeast.

Before Hurricane Florence came to the coast of North Carolina Barrera sat behind the wheel of her tractor, hauling a trailer load for C.R. England. Reports on the what was then a category 4-5 storm reached the trucking company, so they urged drivers to head their rigs back to Smithfield Foods in Kinston to hunker for the storm. “I was thankful to get home Tuesday before we got flooded,” said Barrera. There was some relief when the hurricane’s strength was decreasing as it made landfall in North Carolina on Thursday, but the rains overwhelmed the Neuse River and smaller creeks. Kinston quickly flooded, as did the lot where Barrera’s tractor was waiting out the storm. 

“I was devastated because I couldn’t work,” said Barrera. “If the wheels don’t go, I don’t get paid.” A flooded truck lot, impassable roads, and closed schools meant this soldier of The Salvation Army Washington Corps couldn’t just sit home and wait. “I had to do something for these families who were suffering.” She pulled her Salvation Army soldier’s uniform out of the closet and headed to the Corps. She joined the rest of the crew to board the Washington Corps canteen that was headed 45 miles east to Scranton. Located at sea level on the Pungo River, Scranton experienced significant flooding and lost power, meaning people were hungry and needed a helping hand.

“We fed 101 people lunch today and they were so thankful and appreciative,” said Barrera. “Living so close to the water meant they have been through this before, but extending them some hope after this storm helps them to see the light.” Her truck remained in the lot again on Tuesday, so she was back on the road with The Salvation Army mobile feeding unit. While serving lunch she received an alert that her truck was ready to go. By nightfall, she headed to Newport News, Virginia, with her next load.

“I am sorry not to get paid from my job, but serving them the first hot meal they’ve seen in several days and seeing them smile makes volunteering worth it!”

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Local Business Partners with The Salvation Army to Carry on Legacy of Giving

CONWAY, SC (September 18, 2018) – Brothers Derrick and Darryl Detrick come from a family of givers. “My parents were total givers,” says Derrick. “Dad has a scholarship named after him, and mom, when Hurricane Matthew hit us hard a few years back and a lady lost her home, well, mom bought her a new one.”

It’s compassion and love that motivates us to give, and the Detrick’s were infusing their young boys with a legacy of love starting at an early age; love for each other and love of their community.

Derrick and Darryl had always been close. Earlier years growing up in Augusta, Georgia, and memories of great summer family vacations in Myrtle Beach led Derrick to attend school at Georgetown Technical College in Conway, S.C. for a degree in Golf Course Management. Soon after he started a landscaping business in close by Myrtle Beach. “I love the beach,” says Derrick.

Brother Darryl quickly joined the new business venture. Years went on and in 2005 Derrick and Darryl branched out and opened their first “Detrick’s Car Wash” location in Myrtle Beach. “It was a really fast growing area and we wanted to be part of it” says Darryl, “We love the community and that’s why we stay here.” Business has been good for the Detrick’s, now with a fourth location in the Myrtle Beach area.

“Matthew hit our community hard two years ago,” says Darryl. “We saw then how the community we love suffered.” Derrick adds, “Now that we see it happening again, we want to give back to the community that has been so good to us.”

Derrick and Darryl chose to give back to their community through a gift of $15,000 to The Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services for those impacted by Hurricane Florence. “We want to make sure people have food, clothes and a place to stay if things get really bad again,” says Darryl. “And we have confidence that The Salvation Army will do the most good with our gift.”

Derrick and Darryl received some additional good news – their gift will be matched by Sinclair Broadcast Group, who has partnered with The Salvation Army to aid ongoing disaster relief efforts for the victims of Hurricane Florence. Sinclair will hold a national Day of Giving on September 20, encouraging viewers to help those struggling to rebuild. As part of the relief effort, Sinclair will match the first $100,000 of the funds raised nationally.

Major David Repass, Corp officer for The Salvation Army of Conway, S.C., represents The Salvation Army in receiving the Detrick’s gift. “The Detrick’s prove that there are still kind people in the world who care about the plight of their neighbors.”

“I learned that from my dad,” says Derrick.

Indeed, he has.

How to Help
The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors as the situation continues to be assessed. 

Online: helpsalvationarmy.org

Donate by phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY

Mail checks to: The Salvation Army, P.O. BOX 1959, Atlanta, GA 30301

Please designate ‘2018 Hurricane Season – Florence’ on all checks.

To receive a donation link via text: Text STORM to 51555

Sinclair “Day of Giving” Sept 20 Partnership with The Salvation Army – match up to $100,000: http://sinclaircares.helpsalvationarmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Longing for Power, Finding Strength in Morehead City, North Carolina

Morehead City, NC (September 18, 2018) – Before, during and after a disaster, The Salvation Army is there. In the immediate aftermath, The Salvation Army often serves at evacuation shelters. But, it also canvasses communities to find people in need of a meal and a kind word, wherever they may be. Many communities are still without electricity, and few stores have reopened.

On Tuesday, a mobile feeding kitchen stopped in several neighborhoods in Morehead City, NC, where the evidence of Florence was on full display. In many of these neighborhoods, trees poke through roofs, power lines dangle in the streets, and people congregate outside in hopes of catching a gentle breeze on a hot, sunny day.

The bad weather is long gone, but the disaster is only beginning.

“We’ve been through tragedy here,” Amanda Buck said. “It’s been hard. It’s been really hard.”

Buck and her family live in one of these hard-hit neighborhoods that remain without power. She’s been without power for several days. As The Salvation Army “canteen” pulled into view, the line begins to form.

“This meal makes a big difference,” she said. “I don’t know what we’d do without The Salvation Army coming by daily. We have a few snacks, but they are bringing substantial food…something that will stick with you longer. We appreciate everything being done for us.”

Her house was destroyed, as was her aunt’s. In a way, she feels fortunate. “We’re struggling, but we’re making it,” she says with a smile. “We are just so glad to be alive. We are sticking in there.”

A couple miles over, Bruce Coolbeth stops to pick up lunch for his family and describes the challenges he’s facing.

“The house is a little damaged, but the power is what’s killing us,” Coolbeth said. “Without power, I’ve been unable to work. I can’t feed kids without money. I can do some, but not all.”

Local utility companies are telling residents power will be restored soon. Crews are working nonstop to see that happen. In fact, as of press time, the number of outages been reduced to around 31,000 or 53 percent of Carteret County.

And, residents like Jim Lowe are eager to see the lights come back on in his neighborhood.

“It’s been miserable,” he said. “Air conditioning, lights, you take it all for granted.”

Despite the hardships, this community is strong and resilient. Many locals echo the thoughts of Lowe: “I’m glad I making it through.”

The Salvation Army helps after a disaster by providing food, drinks, shelter, emotional and spiritual care, and more to meet the needs of those affected by disaster. We are able to do this because of the generous donations we receive from the public. A financial contribution is the best way to help after a disaster and The Salvation Army uses 100% of all disaster donations in response to that disaster. To give to The Salvation Army’s relief efforts for Hurricane Florence, go to helpsalvationarmy.org

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The Salvation Army Meeting Needs in Close-Knit Community

Newport, NC (September 17, 2018) – There’s one way to describe Newport, NC: a close-knit community. A town of about 5,000 in Carteret County, Newport endured some of the worst Hurricane Florence had to offer. Rainfall exceeds 25 inches in the county, causing historic flooding and widespread power outages. More than 80 percent of residents are still without power. Most stores remained closed.

Yet, the words you hear around town are most often words of thankfulness and concern for a neighbor.

At Newport Middle School, which has been set up as an evacuation shelter currently providing refuge for about 350, the words echoing the halls are “Thank you.” While eager to get back into their homes, people are appreciative of a place to find a hot meal, electricity and a kind word.

While serving at the shelter, The Salvation Army is also canvassing the surrounding area to find people in need of food and water.

“Thank God y’all are here, doing something for this community,” a gentleman named Alan said as he picked up a meal on Monday from a Salvation Army’s mobile feeding kitchen. The canteen and crew, from Winston-Salem, NC, had spent the day offering food and water to those in need in Morehead City and downtown Newport.

Several people visiting the mobile feeding kitchen in Newport were there on behalf of a neighbor. One man was getting a hot meal for his 83-year-old neighbor, who couldn’t leave after a tree fell through his house. Another woman was getting meals for a group of older women who were shut-in.

In Newport, everyone is looking out for each other. And, it’s not just because this community is in a state of emergency. It’s what they do every day.

“We are a tight-knit community, and The Salvation Army fits right in,” said Dennis Barber, mayor of Newport. “The Salvation Army is a God-send. A lot of folks in Carteret County would be going hungry if it wasn’t for The Salvation Army.”

The Salvation Army helps after a disaster by providing food, drinks, shelter, emotional and spiritual care, and more to meet the needs of those affected by disaster. We are able to do this because of the generous donations we receive from the public. A financial contribution is the best way to help after a disaster and The Salvation Army uses 100% of all disaster donations in response to that disaster. To give to The Salvation Army’s relief efforts for Hurricane Florence, go to helpsalvationarmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Salvation Army Serving in the Carolinas after Hurricane Florence

An Army of Salvation Army officers, employees, and volunteers is working to feed, hydrate, and give hope to people impacted by Hurricane Florence

The Salvation Army is on the ground, serving people in communities impacted by Hurricane Florence. Today 51 mobile feeding units with crews of food service workers and emotional and spiritual care specialists are on the ground, working to feed, hydrate, and give hope to people impacted by Hurricane Florence.  The impacts from Florence continue to unfold across the Carolinas as extensive river flooding continues to unfold in areas already heavily impacted by Hurricane Florence. Some rivers are expected to remain in major flood stage well into next week.

On the ground reports from some of the Salvation Army service areas:

Horry County, SC
The community and Incident Command team are prepping for the disaster after the disaster in the 12,000 sq miles of Horry County. The Little PeeDee River is expected to crest over the next week with 2.5 ft. above record levels with the Waccamaw River following shortly. Anticipate most roads will be cut off and looking at contingency plans of possibly splitting the IC into two groups; north and south. It is anticipated roads in and out of Conway will be cut off due to rising waters.

A wonderful connection with The Salvation Army and the Hispanic community of Horry Co has been established. We are now able to serve a community that may not have been served otherwise. Hundreds of meals have been served to those in the Hispanic community who have been displaced by flooding.

Canteens continue to serve first responders at Fire Departments and those affected by flooding waters congregating at small community centers. People are aware of the flood waters that are coming, but many are not able to move and are planning to ride out the rising waters.

Currently, there are pockets of service areas, but power is on and businesses are open in most places. In affected communities, many residents are helping each other.

Williamsburg and Georgetown Counties, SC
Georgetown, SC is cut off from both directions because of extensive flooding. Salvation Army teams dropped supplies into Georgetown yesterday and mobile feeding units are in place to serve the community after the roads clear.

Washington, NC
The Washington Salvation Army expects to continue to provide hot meals, cold drinks, snacks, and much-needed spiritual and emotional through Saturday dinner in two locations, the Chocowinity Fire Department and Aurora, NC. In addition, the catering truck is fully stocked with cold beverages and snacks and roams neighborhoods where clean-up crews are working. The team is currently looking to secure cleaning kits for distribution to the communities.

Carteret County, NC
Canteens and crews from Winston-Salem, Raleigh and Newnan, Ga., continue to serve meals and water to communities throughout Carteret County. The focus has turned primarily to the “Down East” communities of Harkers Island, Davis, Atlantic, North River and South River, and others. These areas expect to be without power for a month, if not longer. The shelter at Beaufort Elementary School will close tomorrow morning, while the Newport Middle School shelter continues to serve about 300 displaced individuals. The Salvation Army continues to provide meals and spiritual and emotional care to those residing there on a daily basis.

Wilmington, NC
The power in Wilmington proper is coming on quickly so the majority of people have power. Also several eateries have reopened and are now accessible to the population. Now in the outer counties there is still no power and a lot of standing water. The majority of the people that we are feeding are still w/o power.

Duplin, Lenoir, and Greene Counties, NC
The rivers are still rising and are expected to crest late tonight or early tomorrow morning. We have one mobile feeding unit permanently at one location to feed first responders. We dropped supplies to them yesterday because we knew the roads will be flooded soon. The roads were closing behind us as we left. We are so glad to keep the first responders fed and hydrated so they can help people in the community. The NC Baptist Men are cooking the food for us.  Duplin County is underwater and there are limited routes open. Our board chair was able to get into our location in Duplin County and pack bags of groceries for families – the sheriff and police departments are delivering them to families. Hopefully this food will get households through until the roads are accessible again.

Sampson and Wayne Counties, NC
Operations remain fluid.   Today we will have one crew cooking for the other two who will be roaming.  We will be distributing cases of water and bread to people who come through the Corps today.

The Salvation Army is serving from the following Salvation Army locations:
· Salvation Army of Horry County, SC serving Horry County
 · Salvation Army of Georgetown, SC serving Georgetown and Williamsburg counties
· Salvation Army of Florence, SC serving Florence, Marion, Dillon, Darlington, and Chesterfield counties
· Salvation Army of Wilmington, NC serving New Hanover, Brunswick, Columbus, Bladen, Pender counties
· Salvation Army of Jacksonville, NC serving Onslow, Jones counties
· Salvation Army of Morehead City, NC serving Carteret County
· Salvation Army of New Bern, NC serving Pamlico, Craven counties
· Salvation Army of Kinston, NC serving Lenoir, Greene, Duplin counties
· Salvation Army of Washington,NC serving Bertie, Martin, Washington, Tyrrel, Hyde, Beaufort counties
· Salvation Army of Greenville, NC serving Pitt County
· Salvation Army of Goldsboro, NC serving Wayne, Sampson counties
· Salvation Army of Fayetteville, NC serving Cumberland, Hoke, Moore, Scotland, Robeson counties

**Visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org for a list of public feeding locations. Locations will be updated daily by 10:30 a.m. daily.**

About The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services

  • We have served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900.
  • In times of disaster, we serve the whole person – physically, emotionally, and spiritually.
  • After immediate needs are met, The Salvation Army will remain and continue to partner with impacted communities to rebuild. Rebuilding communities takes time and partnership, and we will be there as long as it takes.
  • The Salvation Army is there before, during, and after the storm.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The Salvation Army Aids First Responders in Conway SC

CONWAY, SC (September 17, 2018) – Conway, S.C. sits just inland from Myrtle Beach, which is located at the heart of South Carolina’s Grand Strand coast. The area is a haven for millions of residents and vacationers that enjoy the wide beaches, sunny days and warm weather in abundance. It was one of those beautiful South Carolina days, the day before Hurricane Florence hit. And if you were not listening to weather reports, you would have been without a clue to the destruction headed toward you.                         

But many people were watching and preparing for the inevitable. They knew what was ahead – and they were trained, experienced and ready for what was coming ashore. These were the first responders; a collective group of local heroes who put their lives on the line every day to protect our local communities and help keep them safe from harm.

Four days after landfall, Florence was still lingering over South Carolina.  And the first responders of Conway, S.C were still in action. “Last night was a tough night,” says Captain Robert Rudelitch of the Finklea Fire Department Station 9, “The whole night was spent doing water rescues; people stranded in homes and cars.”

People rescued by the Horry County first responders stayed in area shelters, and at the Finklea and Loris, S.C. fire stations. “Thirty people spent the night at the Finklea station last night,” added Rudelich. The Salvation Army provided meals and hydration for those rescued and the responders, as well.

It’s now the fifth day after Hurricane Florence hit, and the sun is coming back out in South Carolina, attempting to dry those wide sandy Myrtle Beach vacation spots. But like a bad second verse, danger lurks unsuspectingly just days ahead as the torrents of water Florence dumped on the North Carolina watershed make their way downstream to Conway and Myrtle Beach. Another storm is coming in the form of flood waters.

The first responders will be there ready to take action. And right along with them will be The Salvation Army.

“When disaster strikes, The Salvation Army stands ready to support and serve those impacted by disaster and those first responders on the front lines,” says Jerry Williams, Director of Community Relations for The Salvation Army of Conway, and the Incident Commander for The Salvation Army’s disaster response for Horry County and Conway S.C.

“Every day, first responders put their own lives on the line to ensure our safety. The least we can do is make sure they have a good meal and something to drink,” says Williams.

And he knows what he is talking. Williams is also a former Captain for the Horry County Fire Department and a former Emergency Management Director for Horry County.

How to Help
The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors as the situation continues to be assessed. 

Online: helpsalvationarmy.org

Donate by phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY

Mail checks to: The Salvation Army, P.O. BOX 1959, Atlanta, GA 30301

Please designate ‘2018 Hurricane Season – Florence’ on all checks.

To receive a donation link via text: Text STORM to 51555

###

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Salvation Army Brings Hot Meals and Hope to Hyde County

Washington, NC (September 17, 2018)–After having lost power for more than 72 hours in Rose Bay, NC, Jessica Bianco had frayed nerves and a refrigerator and freezer full of spoiled food, and then The Salvation Army showed up. “I called a phone number on Sunday to find out where I could get food. It was 5:30 p.m. and they said they would be in Scranton, NC, until 6. I raced over there. I was so appreciative to have a hot meal,” said Bianco. 

A single mom raising four children, Bianco was getting dinner from the mobile feeding unit when the power came back on in her home. The mobile feeding unit, also known as a “canteen,” was from The Salvation Army of Washington, NC, stocked with hot food prepared by the Baptist General Association of Virginia. Also known as the “Baptist Kitchen,” similar units are located throughout the coast supporting mass feeding efforts for Hurricane Florence survivors. Serving on The Salvation Army canteen were Lieutenant Karl Bush and advisory board chairman David McLawhorn and his wife Terri. 

Getting the power restored for Bianco took a little longer than expected, due to a toppled pecan tree in her water soaked front yard.  “While the power was out I emptied some of the leaking food out of my refrigerator, but I knew that everything would need to come out and go in the trash eventually,” said Bianco. She spent Sunday night cleaning out.

Rose Bay suffered some of the worst flooding in Hyde County, including the main road, highway 264. This was Bianco’s first storm in Hyde County, but remembers the support of organizations like The Salvation Army when Hurricane Irene hit Gull Rock in 2011. 

“Times like this we just need everyone to come together,” said Bianco. “I lost all my food and someone gave me $100 and another person offered to cut down the tree. We need each other, and I am so glad The Salvation Army is here.”

(photo provided by Jessica Bianco)

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The Salvation Army of Georgia Ready to Respond as Florence Slams Carolinas

ATLANTA, GA (September 14, 2018) – The Salvation Army in Georgia is mobilized and stands ready to respond to areas affected by Hurricane Florence. Four Georgia Salvation Army canteens (mobile kitchen units) from Atlanta, Newnan, Dublin, and Valdosta, Georgia, and their accompanying disaster-trained staff, crew and volunteers are poised in Charlotte, NC staging centers, ready to deploy to provide mass feeding, hydration and spiritual care to the most affected areas. Additional staff and crew from Elberton and Vidalia, Georgia, and three additional emotional and spiritual care personnel, are part of the Georgia contingent. The Georgia units have joined forces with other Salvation Army units responding from the Carolinas and other parts of the southeastern U.S. to provide disaster relief.

Hurricane Florence made landfall in North Carolina as a category 1 hurricane – far from the strength it had earlier in the Atlantic as a category 4 hurricane. However, Florence’s slow pace brings with it strong winds, tidal surges and devastating flood waters that severely impact the lives of those in her path.

“We continue to assess and evaluate the situation,” says Lanita Lloyd, Emergency Disaster Director for The Salvation Army of Georgia, “The Salvation Army of Georgia has 14 additional canteens, complete with staff, crew and volunteers, plus an incident command team on standby, ready to deploy to assist in those areas most affected wherever and whenever needed.”

Forecasters predict conditions will continue to deteriorate as the storm makes its way slowly inland. Its surge will cover most of the Carolina coast under as much as 11 feet of ocean water, and there will be days of downpours that could unload more than 3 feet of rain, touching off severe flooding.

According to Lloyd, the disaster situation in the Carolinas can change quickly, so The Salvation Army is continually assessing it to determine the best possible response. The major concern is flood waters, which can hamper access to impacted areas.

 “The Salvation Army in Georgia is ready to respond aggressively and serve compassionately to help those impacted by Florence,” says Lloyd, “We stand ready to send multiple feeding units in the coming days and weeks to support the residents of each community who need help and hope. Our love and prayers go out to each of them.”

In times of disaster, the best way to help survivors and relief workers is to make a financial contribution. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors.

You can support the ongoing relief work of The Salvation Army by making a financial donation at to www.helpsalvationarmy.org, call 1-800-SAL-ARMY, text STORM to 51555. For updates on The Salvation Army’s emergency disaster response efforts, visit www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)