New Orleans Salvation Army Participates in Active Shooter Exercise

 

Kenner, LA (02/28/2015) – Representatives from The Salvation Army participated in an active shooter exercise today near Kenner, LA.  This training event for law enforcement and emergency services was designed to prepare for incidents involving active shooters.  The emergency exercise was conducted at an area elementary school involving Kenner PD, Kenner FD and Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office personnel.  The exercise was quite large involving between 400-600 people (emergency personnel, scenario actors, volunteers, etc).  Area Salvation Army Administrator, Major David Worthy stated, “During any event like this,The Salvation Army would respond to support first responders and potential victims, so when they were planning for the event, they invited us to activate our units as well.”

The Salvation Army’s role during this event was to respond with its emergency canteen as well as EDS personnel to provide hydration, snacks, and meals throughout the day.  Two additional “respite stations” were also set-up by Salvation Army EDS personnel to provide hydration and nourishment at other points within the exercise zone.  The area’s recent acquisition, a Ford F-250 Support Truck was also utilized on-site as water buffalo to ensure that continuous fluids were available to all those involved in the exercise.  Major David Worthy believes that the team will serve between 600 and 900 people during this event.

The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster survivors, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.

Blind artist paints for others at Salvation Army “Let your Hands be the Eyes”

Pope says Salvationists and Catholics meet at peripheries of society

pope

History was made with the first private audience in the Vatican with Pope Francis and the General of The Salvation Army.

General André Cox met the Pope who said that theological differences do not impede the witness of a shared love of God and neighbor. He also spoke of his first encounter, as a 4 year old, with Salvation Army Officers which, he said, stirred in him a sense of ecumenical outreach beyond the teachings of the Catholic Church in that era.

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Dillard’s Stores and The Salvation Army Drive to Do Good

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It’s no secret that it has become unseasonably cold for many parts of The United States. And with the temperatures continuing to drop, it’s time to bundle up.

This year, as you transition to your warmer wardrobe, consider freeing up some space in those cluttered closets and drawers by donating any jackets and coats you no longer wear to help support families who cannot afford proper winter attire.
Thanks to the generosity of Dillard’s Department Stores, The Salvation Army is helping to fill this need. This Saturday, November 22, select Dillard’s locations will host a one-day coat drive benefiting The Salvation Amy- and they need your help.

Visit one of the 86 participating stores this weekend and bring in any gently used coats and receive a token of appreciation from Dillard’s.
Just by clearing out your closet, you can make a huge difference in someone’s life.

If there is not a Dillard’s in your area, you can always donate gently used or new coats to your local Salvation Army Family Store. Just visit www.satruck.org and find the closet location near you.
A special thank you to Dillard’s for their generosity and support of The Salvation Army’s mission to Do The Most Good!
Dillard’s,The Salvation Amy, coat drive

Salvation Army begins Red Kettle campaign

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BENTONVILLE, Ark. —Volunteers, Bentonville city leaders and the Salvation Army will gather at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Harp’s Grocery Store in Bentonville to kick off the Red Kettle campaign.

The campaign will start the donation and fundraising season for the Salvation Army which receives most of its yearly budget during the months of November and December.

Most of the budget helps create a Christmas to remember for more than 2,000 less-fortunate children in Northwest Arkansas.

Donations will also help its programs that help the less-fortunate, those dealing with drug and alcohol problems and its shelters in Fayetteville and Bentonville.

In addition to donations, the Salvation Army is also looking for volunteers.

People can volunteer their time online or sponsor a kettle by going to the website redkettlevolunteer.org

red kettle

Salvation Army Florida seeking bell ringers

bell ringers

— The Salvation Army is looking for bell ringers as the holiday season approaches.

The Army’s branches in Broward and Miami-Dade counties are looking for people to ring bells during the annual Red Kettle Campaign. The job lasts through Christmas Eve and pays $8.50 an hour.

The Salvation Army’s Sally Gress told the Miami Herald (http://hrld.us/10QVs44 ) the holiday campaign is one of the agency’s most important fundraisers. Bell ringers have been collecting donations since 1891.

In Broward County, the agency is having two job fairs to fill 50 positions. Gress says they are looking for people with good people skills. And being able to stand outside for up to 10 hours a shift also helps.

In Miami-Dade, the agency will hire about 15 bell ringers at each of its four centers.

 

Original Article: Here

Coats for Kids seeks outerwear, financial help

coats for kidsIf you didn’t clean your closet in the spring, organizers of the Coats for Kids drive hope you will organize it soon.

Donations of new or gently used coats, hats, gloves and scarves are being accepted through Nov. 7 for the annual collection.

It’s not just young children being served by this collection. Coats are needed for infants through high school students, so sizes youth 0 to adult 3X are sought.

More local businesses are offering collection space for the coats this year.

Those who don’t have a coat to give but who want to donate money can submit a check to the G101.3 radio station, 2301 W. Main St.

Armstrong Cleaners & Formal Wear again is donating cleaning services.

Families can apply for a coat through the Salvation Army Citadel at 700 S. A St., Richmond, which is handling coat distribution.

Last year, 912 coats were collected, including 136 new coats. Other gifts included 81 pairs of gloves, 38 scarves and 79 hats.

In 2012, about 600 coats were donated.

Manpower is the title sponsor with G101.3 the host for the local collection.

 

Where to give

Coats and accessories may be dropped off at First Bank and West End Bank locations, plus:

  • Manpower, 500 E. Main St.
  • RMD/Patti, 36 S. Ninth St.
  • Richmond Power & Light, 44 S. Eighth St.
  • Best-One Tire & Service, 100 N. Seventh St.
  • Williams & Keckler LLC, 808 S. A St.
  • Armstrong Cleaners, 1019 N. A St. and 651 N.W. Fifth St.
  • Subway East (4340 National Road E.) and West (1726 National Road W.)
  • Georgia Direct Carpet, 5200 National Road E.
  • Buffalo Wings and Rings, 500 Commerce Road
  • Natco Credit Union, 4 Glen Miller Parkway and 582 S. Round Barn Road
  • G101.3, 2301 W. Main St.

 

To learn more, call (765) 966-2664.

Community Events

Changing the Coffee Culture

coffee culture

Salvos Coffee works to decrease labor exploitation and increase sustainability.

By Faye Michelson – 

Imagine coffee cherries grown without fertilizers or pesticides in the rich volcanic soil of Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) pristine Eastern Highlands and picked, pulped, washed and sorted by hand in remote villages, then dried in the sun for three days.

The Salvation Army works with coffee farmers and their families in this remote part of the world to ensure they receive a fair price for their harvest.

coffee culture 2“Coffee growers would walk for days with 30 kilograms [66 pounds] of coffee beans in bags on their backs to get to a roadside to sell, only to get ripped off,” said Luke Soper, business development manager for the PNG Territory. And so the Salvos Coffee program—initiated and developed in 2007 in PNG as a Community Advancement Reform Enhancement—assists 700 growers and their 3,500 family members in growing, harvesting and preparing beans for sale.

Soper’s job is to ensure the program is financially sustainable so that other aspects of The Salvation Army’s work with the farmers—such as health, hygiene, literacy, financial and agricultural education—can expand.

“Coffee growers who once would have had no other option but to sell their coffee for an unfair price at the roadside are now empowered,” Soper said. For instance, the program started a “passbook system” that releases profits to the growers when they want it until they have proper proof of identity or birth to open their first bank account.

Joseph Manase of the Kesawaka area wanted to become a pastor, but left school in fourth grade. When Salvos Coffee field officers went to his village they talked to him about resuming his education and showed him how to save money for school fees. He now attends high school with the money earned by his wife, who continues to work with Salvos Coffee in their village and also sends their children to school.

When the Ivoti people sold their coffee at a higher price than they expected they used the profit to buy roofing iron, coffee pulping machines and gardening tools. The Salvos Coffee team took them to a warehouse to buy the goods and helped arrange transportation of the equipment.

The program works through a cluster system centered around local Salvation Army churches in each participating village.

Community endorsement is vital for this project to succeed. We work to establish a rapport with the village headman and growers, because without that we can’t make headway.

“That’s very important; The Salvation Army is respected and trusted, and people understand we are there to help bring opportunity and fairness,” Soper said. “Community endorsement is vital for this project to succeed. We work to establish a rapport with the village headman and growers, because without that we can’t make headway.”

Salvos Coffee faces many community challenges, including domestic and family violence, so in addition to economics, the program also addresses resolving conflict and managing anger.

Soper divides his time between Sydney and PNG, a country that spans “tropical island to mountainous highlands.”

“One of the tough things, though, is living between a world of excess in Australia and extreme need in PNG,” he said. “We face many challenges—the ruggedness and the remoteness, and the cost of transportation.” Yet he said he finds reward in helping people in need. “It’s also important for me to be able to share with people in Australia—and my four young children—how well off we are and what we are doing in PNG to make a real and sustainable difference,” he said.

The Church Partnership Program provided funding to sustain Salvos Coffee for many years, and now the program must be self-sustaining. As Soper said, “Your purchase of our coffee helps fund a dedicated team in PNG to provide much-needed support services for remote, marginalized coffee growers and their families.”

See more at salvos.org.au/coffee

This post was originally featured in The New Frontier Chronicle.