mission statement

Salvation Army captains bid farewell, extend thanks to community

After more than three years overseeing the Bartow County service area, Salvation Army Capts. Lee and Michelle Wilson will bid farewell June 21.

“We received our orders to move to the divisional headquarters of the Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi division of The Salvation Army,” Michelle Wilson said. “Our office will be located in Jackson, Miss. Our roles in Jackson will be in finance for myself and program for Lee.

“We are so grateful for the many blessings we have received from serving here in Bartow County. We could not have met the many challenges and opportunities that came our way without the support of the community. We truly say from the bottom of our hearts, ‘Thank you for your support.’”

She continued, “I have been amazed since our first few days here about how giving this community is, especially when it comes to nonprofits. Our kettle effort is a testimony of this, as we run a 55 percent volunteer driven effort. This far exceeds the standard of many other Salvation Army commands both small and large.”

Extending thanks to the community, the Wilsons said they were continuously impressed by the public’s willingness to help their neighbors in need.

“I think my most memorable moment is how God has provided over and over again through the generosity of others,” Michelle Wilson said. “In nonprofit work, you can be tempted to walk by sight and be discouraged by the great needs around you, but we know that as Christians we walk by faith in expectancy of what will be done for us.

“We have been, at many times throughout our 3 1/2 years, unsure of how we would meet the needs of our neighbors in need but just at the right time, the heart of a caring volunteer or generous donor would be led to support us in exactly the way that was needed.”

Operating in Cartersville since 1995, The Salvation Army — an evangelical part of the universal Christian church — aided more than 11,000 people last year with various services, such as food, financial assistance and youth character building programs. While the thrift store closed April 30, the nonprofit will hold monthly sales in the future to support The Salvation Army’s programs and services.

“In 2014, The Salvation Army served 11,324 people right here in Bartow County. That, based on 2013’s population is 11.18 percent of Bartow County that is being served by The Salvation Army,” Michelle Wilson said. “Each and every day we provide basic needs, such as food, toiletries, prescription assistance, utility assistance and disaster services.

“We also serve underprivileged children each week through our youth character building programs, which provide life skills to youth K [through] 12. Lastly, we offer our seasonal services that provide toys and clothing through the Angel Tree program to children in need, opportunities for children to attend weeklong summer camps as well as community care outreach to shut-ins throughout the county.”

In addition to The Salvation Army’s donors and recipients, Bartow’s church community also has made a lasting impression on Lee Wilson.
“Bartow County is a county that prays,” he said. “Last year my wife and I were present at the National Day of Prayer service that was held outside of the courthouse. While there, we learned of the Bible being read cover to cover in various places in the county, and we thought that was amazing. So amazing, that this year, we took our youth group to one of the locations to participate in this reading. Seeing our young people taking part in this event was something I will never forget.”

On June 28, the Wilsons’ successors — Capts. Scott and Michelle Lyles — will start serving the Salvation Army’s Cartersville Corps.

“This transition of leadership in The Salvation Army is something that happens every so often,” Lee Wilson said. “Capts. Scott and Michelle Lyles are two very capable officers, and I know that they are not only praying for their new community, but looking forward to joining the Bartow County family. It is my hope and prayer that you will embrace them as you did us, and continue to support the work of The Salvation Army as they continue to do the work that our Lord and Savior has called us all to do.”

For more information about supporting the Salvation Army, located at 16 Felton Place, call 770-386-6256 or send the nonprofit a message via its Facebook page, The Salvation Army – Cartersville, Ga.

liz murray

Harvard graduate born into poverty and homeless as a teen shares her story

liz murrayWhen Liz Murray overcame homelessness to graduate from Harvard University, people called her a bootstrapper and lauded her hard work.

But hard work doesn’t tell the whole story, said Murray, the featured speaker at today’s D.J.’s Hero Awards luncheon sponsored by the Salvation Army.

There has to be a bridge — someone or something offering help and encouragement, she said. That could be a committed social worker, a friendly stranger, a scholarship fund.

“When you have that, an introduction to a person who can help you, it’s a bridge that turns hard work into opportunity,” she said.

In an interview Monday, Murray said it’s up to the community to be that bridge: “Nobody is off the hook.”

She said today’s Salvation Army event is part of the solution. Eight high school seniors each will receive a $10,000 scholarship at the luncheon. The awards are named after D.J. Sokol, the son of David and Peggy Sokol, who contributed to his school and community despite battling cancer. He died in 1999 at age 18.

Murray said she had lots of help and inspiration along her path. She went from being a homeless teen who missed school 75 percent of the time to making up lost courses in two years and winning a New York Times scholarship to the Ivy League school.

She was born in grinding poverty to drug-addicted parents, but she never was angry at them. Instead, she viewed the addiction as a terrible thing that happened to the family, which included a sister.

“I had an instinct for the fact that they were sick,” she said. “People can’t give what they don’t have.”

Despite that, they gave her plenty. She was grateful she grew up with two parents who showed her an abundance of love. With regular trips to the public library, her dad — who had two college degrees — planted the idea that education was a way out. Her mom taught her to dream when she shared her own dreams with her daughter at night.

In a roundabout way, they taught her to be independent. “I never expected people to do things, because no one did,” Murray said.

At age 13 she ended up in a difficult group home when her mom was hospitalized with end-stage AIDS. Dad was in a homeless shelter, and her sister lived with friends. By 15, she was homeless herself.

Her mom’s dreams of becoming sober and owning a home died when AIDS claimed her life. Murray took that as a signal that she should get serious about school to preserve her own dreams. She graduated from the Humanities Preparatory Academy in Manhattan despite a still-precarious living situation.

Strangers who read her story in the Times showed up to help: bringing brownies, cards, a homemade quilt. One woman drove from New Jersey each week to do her laundry.

Now, she said, she tries to do the same for teens in similar situations. She works with youths from Covenant House, the largest organization for homeless teens in the country. She looks for ways to introduce them to people who want to help with jobs, internships and other aid.

“I love to see people’s dreams come true,” she said.

She turned that coaching into a full-time business, but recently stepped back to have a family and pursue a doctorate in psychology from Columbia University.

She’ll share her story with the 1,100 people expected for today’s luncheon at the CenturyLink Center. She finds inspiration in the stories of each winner in the award’s 15-year history. They all have much to contribute, she said.

It’s up to everyone to help more young people figure that out, she said.

“One thing I hear people say constantly, when they’re talking about the ills of the world, is that someone needs to do something — ‘they’ need to do something. I ask: Do you realize there’s no ‘they?’ ”

women of dedication

Women of Dedication Honored

women of dedication

Women of Dedication

The 50th Women of Dedication presented by The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary was held on April 7 at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront. Fifteen women were recognized for their support to the San Diego community. Honoree Dr. Elisabeth Jones was unable to attend and is not included in the photo. Proceeds raised at the event are designated for the Haven Program at the Door of Hope. Other funds raised bringing the total net to $200,000, go to the programs supported by the Auxiliary. Corporate Sponsors for the luncheon included San Diego Foundation, SDG&E/Sempra Energy, San Diego Chargers, Ahern Seeds, Sycuan Casino and Union Bank.

Salvation Army accepting donations for Nepal earthquake victims

20150428NepalEarthquake

Donations for Nepal are being accepted

The Salvation Army is mobilizing emergency response personnel and supplies after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Nepal flattened homes and buildings, causing widespread damage across the region and killing more than 2,000 people.

With more than 75 offices throughout the area, volunteers and staff are well-prepared to service the immediate and long-term needs of those impacted by natural disasters. Since 1882, the Salvation Army has served the people of its India Eastern territory.

“Donations from the generous public will help provide basic necessities that survivors desperately need right now,” said Lt. Col. Ron Busroe, the Salvation Army’s national community relations and development secretary. “But the effects of this tragedy will be felt for months – even years. We know that emotional and spiritual counseling is equally important for survivors to deal with the gravity of the situation.”

Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. The Salvation Army has set up a designated fund in which 100 percent of gifts will go to relief efforts in Nepal. To donate, visit salar.my/Nepal or call 800-SAL-ARMY.

Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office, designated for “Nepal Earthquake,” can be sent to: Salvation Army World Service Office, International Relief Fund, P.O. Box 418558, Boston, MA 02241-8558.

In-kind donations are not being accepted.

Kroc Center

Hampton Roads Kroc Center – The Salvation Army is about to celebrate it’s 1-year anniversary.

human trafficking

Anti-slavery operation Arrest made

anti-slavery

Arrest made in joint GLA anti-slavery operation

13 individuals have been arrested as a part of a joint GLA anti-slavery operation involving the Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA), Peterborough City Council and National Crime Company (NCA), the British Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

Operation Launch is the Peterborough-led response to Operation Mustily, an on-going NCA investigation into human trafficking and forced labour of Slovakian nationals inside the UK.

Approximately 300 police and partner agency officers and employees had been involved in the operation in Peterborough that saw raids and arrests at 20 properties throughout town.

Officers engaged with forty six potential victims, 20 of which, including six kids, have been removed from the properties and brought to a reception centre, facilitated by Peterborough City Council, while additional enquiries are carried out.

Those arrested, six males and 7 females, have all been taken to Thorpe Wood police station.

The names of those arrested weren’t disclosed.

 

Click here for more information on Combating Human Trafficking

or visit

www.havenatl.org

General André Cox to visit Asbury University

General Andre Cox

Gen. André Cox Will probably be on campus immediately and Wednesday

WILMORE, Ky. (April 21, 2015) — Gen. André Cox and Commissioner Silvia Cox of The Salvation Military are at Asbury College right now and Wednesday.

Cox is the twentieth world-broad chief of the Salvation Military. Cox beforehand held appointments in Switzerland and Zimbabwe and served as a territorial commander within the Southern Africa Territory, the Finland and Estonia Territory and the UK Territory with the Republic of Eire. In February 2013, he was appointed as Chief of the Workers.

The go to will embody a tour of Asbury, conferences with college management, fellowship with Salvationist college and employees and a Chapel tackle on Wednesday.

Asbury’s relationship with the Salvation Military is longstanding—the primary Salvationist scholar got here to Asbury in 1924, and over time, greater than 500 Salvationists have attended the college.

Asbury College is the one school with an official Salvation Military Scholar Heart, which was inbuilt 1983

salvation army

Gov’t of Liberia Gives $140K to The Salvation Army’s William Booth High School for Facelift

liberia salvation army

Monrovia — The Government of Liberia on April 8, 2015 presented a check in the amount of one hundred forty thousand, one hundred and fifty-five United States dollars (140,155), to the administration and officer in-Charge of the Salvation Army’s William Booth Junior & Senior High School that was gutted by fire on March 4th 2015.

Presenting the check on behalf of the Government, Liberia’s Assistant minister for Budget and Development planning Hon. Augustin K. Blama said restoring the burnt structure and providing furniture to enable the 983 students get back to classes are the result of the government commitment to providing education to all regardless of the sector.

He said, that the project is expected to be completed within 3o-days and believes upon completion it will change the narratives of warehouses and computer rooms and library been used for classrooms “it is imperative for our student at William Booth continues to learn in a conducive and healthy atmosphere free from fear of fire and crime” he added.

Minister Blama also encouraged students of the William Booth School to always seek to strive for the top and to report any suspicious activity that might affect their institution. He said the government remains steadfast in its continual commitment to educating the future generation of this country.

For her part, the Minister of Education Hon. Etmonia Tarpel expressed her frustration and disappointment over the burning of the school infrastructure. She, however, encouraged the family of the institution to be strong and keep the good work on going. ‘Those that did the act thought they were reigning evil upon this school, but let it be known that God has turned the evil into blessing” she added. She said the government will support your effort to the fullest in ensuring that our students are free from this unacceptable encounter.

In a brief remark, the Officer-in Charge of the Salvation Army Col. Gabriel Kathuri extend his gratitude to the government for rapid intervention to solve the unexpected distraction that have reduced our classrooms to warehouse, library computer lab etc. He said, with God, they shall bounce back and even shine brighter than before. Col. Kathuri at the same time encouraged those that cause this disaster to come out and confess.

The Salvation Army’s William Booth Junior & senior High School was gutted by fire on March 4, 2015, thus posting a serious hindrance which to a greater extend has prevented the institution from carrying out its normal academic activities.

Salvation Army fresh food initiative providing Weekly Fresh fruits & vegetables

Fresh Food Initiative.HILLSDALE — On a dreary, blustery and cold Tuesday morning, Hillsdale County residents lined up outside of the Hillsdale Salvation Army to receive fresh food, part of the organizations Fresh Food Initiative.

The initiative, which began in June of 2012, provides those residents in need with a box of fresh food, breads and a dessert.

Sue LeFevre, a Salvation Army employee, said they don’t know week to week what will be on the truck until it arrives each Tuesday morning.
The fresh food initiative gives residents a healthy food option.

“For those residents who are looking for options in cooking the fresh food, we are more than happy to help with recipes,” said Kathy Stump, Salvation Army administrative assistant.

The Salvation Army pays a $300 delivery fee a week from the Food Bank of South Central Michigan for the food, which will feed around 250 families.
Volunteers from the Hope House in Jonesville help the Salvation Army staff pack boxes and bag vegetables on a weekly basis.

During the month of March, 30 unduplicated volunteers contributed 217 hours of service.

Tuesday morning Michele Dropulich and LeAnn Voigtritter, volunteers from the Hope House, were busy packing bags with fresh green beans to be added to the boxes.
“I’ve been on both sides of the line,” Dropulich said. “It feels good to give back with a smile — this is a way I can give back.”

“The house has given me an opportunity. It feels good to be able to pay it forward,” she added.

Food distribution is from 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Tuesday.

Stump said it is open to anyone that is in need of food, no questions asked.

She said lately they have been averaging around 150 families a week.

The remaining food is distributed to other food banks around Hillsdale County.

She said the food has to be distributed fairly quickly, because it is close to its expiration date when it is received.

During the month of March, 604 families or 1,709 individuals were assisted, 372 of which were children. The wholesale value of the food distributed was $48,690.59. The Salvation Army paid $1,200 for the food.

The Salvation Army also offers a free lunch from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. The emergency food pantry is open from 9 a.m. to noon and 1-3 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
By Andy Barrand

Lubbock Salvation Army assists the homeless

Lubbock Salvation Army helps homelessEven with the spring semester coming to an end, Lubbock’s morning breeze and nightly cool temperatures have remained constant. For Lubbock’s homeless population, this often means long, cold nights.

With the help of organizations and volunteers like those in the Salvation Army, individuals are able to bring warmth and aid to those in need, especially during extremely cold conditions.

“We provide a couple of different services to the lower-income community,” Shannon Sudduth, the community relations and development coordinator at the Lubbock Salvation Army, said.

Sudduth has worked actively toward helping the homeless community, she said. Sudduth graduated LCU with a major in organizational communications and is currently working toward her graduate degree at Tech in mass communications. Salvation Army has an event called Survive the Night.

Survive the Night involves active participation of volunteers helping the homeless community around Lubbock get shelter, food and disaster relief.

“We take our truck around during 30 degrees or below temperatures around 6 p.m. during the months of November to mid-February,” Sudduth said. “We drive around downtown looking for homeless community who aren’t able to get back to our shelter and provide them with blankets, warm clothing like scarves, beanies, gloves, that sort of thing.”

Sudduth said during the winter the Salvation Army asks for donations and blankets and they are later put in the building’s storage unit to be supplied to those in need during the right time. Tech students usually help out in the shelter, she said, helping arrange bags containing blankets and hygiene kits. Sudduth said during January there is a sign-up sheet for volunteers to help on their rounds for Survive the Night.

“The program is designed to try and help people survive the night,” Dave Frericks, the disaster coordinator at the Lubbock Salvation Army, said. “Nights we go out and find them on the street and provide them with socks, caps and a hot meal. And if they want we can bring them to the shelter for the night so they can survive one more day.“

Salvation Army recruited Frericks after his work in the government as an advisory board member in the disaster team during 1994.

“One night in February we went out during 12-degree weather. The wind was blowing and we happened to find a fellow sleeping on a bench. He was wearing a T-shirt and shorts,” Frericks said. “He was shaking so badly he could barely stand up. We got him in down here and there was no question in my mind, I wanted to save his life. He would have died right there.”

According to the Tech website students often volunteer with Salvation Army during Tech Lubbock Community Day and with other organizations like Raiders Helping Others.

Tashika Curlee, a senior English and sociology dual major from Paris, Texas, has volunteered with the Boys & Girls Club, Habitat for Humanity, the South Plains Food Bank and the Salvation Army.

Curlee said that she had previously volunteered with the Salvation Army along with her organization Pegasus.

“From everything that I had heard, the Salvation Army was an organization meant to help those who were struggling within the community,” she said.

Most of the students who volunteer at the Salvation Army are assigned to meal preparation, cleaning or other basic duties, she said. Curlee was able to be a part of the volunteer team through the preparation of meals.

During her time volunteering, Curlee said she felt like she really got to know the staff and the work they put forth, in addition to those individuals in need.

“Most of the people were so nice and had an amazing attitude regardless of their circumstances. One family that is burned into my memory is that of a Hispanic father and his two young daughters,” she said. “The daughters were smiling and playing around with each other. They were not the only family we served that day, there were some others as well.”

Volunteering is an important part of being a member of a community, Curlee said. Community means helping others.

“As a college student, I recognize that I would not be here getting a higher education if not for the generosity of those within our community in giving out scholarships and other forms of financial aid,” Curlee said. “Therefore, I believe volunteering at any level showcases how thankful I am and my desire to give back to a community that has given me so much.”