Charging station for homeless

Charging station for homeless

Homeless Charging Station

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Following the misdemeanor arrest of two homeless individuals in Portland for utilizing an outdoor energy outlet to charge their cell phones, Salvation Army staff have created a cellphone charging station.

The Oregonian reports (http://is.gd/htD6im) that the Salvation Army Female Emergency Shelter announced Tuesday that it has 5 USB ports and 4 electrical outlets accessible for any homeless woman who needs to charge their phone and doesn’t cost a thing.

Salvation Army spokeswoman Teresa Steinmetz says keeping electrical devices working is essential to holding down a job, a spot to dwell and different connections.

Final yr two homeless individuals had been charged with misdemeanor theft of services once they had been discovered charging their cell phones at an outside electrical outlet. Under Oregon regulation, there isn’t any minimal financial loss for theft costs. Each charge has since been dropped.

center for hope

More NC children living in poverty than in 2008

 

center for hopeThe number of children in North Carolina living in poverty has increased by 25 percent since 2008, according to a report to be released Tuesday, even as the nation recovered from the recession.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation report, which studies factors related to children’s well-being, noted several worsening financial conditions in the state since the recession, but also saw improvements in healthcare and education. The foundation is a private philanthropy that makes grants to nonprofits to respond to issues that negatively affect children.

About 566,000 children, or one in four in the state, live in poverty, according to the report. Two other measures of financial stability – children whose parents lack secure employment and teens who are not in school and not working – also worsened since 2008.

North Carolina ranked 35th overall in the report for child well-being. The state tied with Texas and Kentucky for the 11th highest child poverty rate in the country. The federal poverty level for a family of four is $24,250.

Laila Bell, the director of research and data for the non-profit NC Child, said that the recession was a trigger for some of the changes, but state legislation contributed to the problems.

As an example, she cited the state allowing the earned income tax credit to expire in 2014. Republican lawmakers at the time said eliminating the tax credit, along with other changes, was meant to simplify the system and to spread the tax burden equally.

Bell said the challenges are even larger than the report indicates because it takes the income of twice the federal poverty level to adequately provide for children.

Measuring by that standard, about half the children in North Carolina live in poverty, or more than a million children, Bell said. Children of color are twice as likely to live in poverty, she said.

Nola Davis, 37, is staying in the Salvation Army’s Center of Hope shelter near uptown with her three children, ages 2, 3 and almost 11. She said her family moved there in October after losing its home and living in a hotel for about a year.

Davis recently found a job with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools and her children’s father works at the airport.

She said she has continually been rejected by landlords for housing despite being able to pay the rent.

“Once they find out you’re here, it’s such a stigma coming from a homeless shelter that nobody wants to rent to you,” she said. Davis and her family recently found a landlord willing to rent to them, and they hope to move in next month.

‘A heavy burden’

Poverty impacts many areas in a child’s life, Bell said. Children in poor households have less access to fresh foods, high-quality schools and green space. Over time, these children may be less prepared for school, impacting their education.

“Coming to school with that on your shoulders is a heavy burden,” said Susan Hansell, executive director of A Child’s Place.

Children living in poverty also spend less time in school because they normally have to use school buses to get home, she said. “They’re not able to take advantage of after-school programs,” she said.

Homeless children can also experience a higher degree of anxiety and depression, Hansell said.

Though poverty affects children at any age, those in early stages of development are particularly susceptible, Bell said.

Davis said her oldest daughter can’t understand all of the circumstances that led to living at the shelter.

“How do you explain that to a child?” she said.

Bell said North Carolina lawmakers could improve conditions for kids in the state by supporting the health of mothers before and during their pregnancies. Better healthcare, possibly through expanded access to insurance for low-income women, can help prevent low birth weight babies.

The state government could also invest more in early childhood education, a key to children’s development and future success in school, Bell said.

Charlotte has a network of support groups and non-profits that can help children and families in poverty, Hansell said. A Child’s Place advocates for homeless children and their families, helping them find healthcare and educational support.

Not all the factors in the Kids Count report worsened. All health measures improved, and three out of four education measures improved. About 94 percent of the state’s children are insured, more than at any point in the state’s history, Bell said.

In education, the report found more fourth-graders are proficient in reading, more eighth-graders are proficient in math and more high school students are graduating on time.

 

fans for the elderly

Fans for the elderly

fans for the elderly

Fans for the Elderly

The Salvation Army and an area media firm are teaming up to assist in making sure that the elderly keep cool throughout the summer’s brutal heat.
Thomas Media and the charity are gathering fans to distribute to elderly and others in poor health.

Salvation Army officers say they’ve given away 15 thus far.

Anyone can donate to the Salvation Army or at any Thomas Media location.

Churches are also gathering money to donate to the Salvation Army.

This is the first year for the program, which started July 1 and will proceed until the end of August.

nepal relief

Salvation Army Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

This post was contributed by The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO)

The Salvation Army continues to serve communities in and around Kathmandu following two earthquakes on April 25 and May 12 that killed 8,787 people and destroyed more than 500,000 homes.

Emergency response teams of The Salvation Army have been serving survivors in the urban and rural areas with operations revolving around camps for displaced people, including camp management roles and the provision of food, shelter, and water. Teams are also assisting many remote mountainous villages that are now isolated due to landslides from the earthquakes and subsequent rains from monsoons.

The Salvation Army has so far distributed 148 metric tons of food – including rice, oil, lentils and salt – to survivors, as many people have lost all of their food. This support will sustain families until the upcoming harvest. Additionally, hundreds of hygiene and sanitation items were distributed.

Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

“This disaster response is especially complicated due to the remote and rugged nature of the terrain in Nepal, making the delivery of aid especially challenging,” said Betsy Baldwin, Disaster Technical Advisor for The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO). “This has meant greater coordination and creativity has been required to reach remote communities and ensure that the limited amount of assistance does not duplicate the work of others.”

Funding from SAWSO is supporting the development of temporary housing and learning centers in the place of schools that were damaged in the earthquake. Approximately 3,000 tarps were distributed to community members needing covered living space and temporary learning spaces while schools are reconstructed.

In continued support of schooling in the area, The Salvation Army provided 850 educational stationery packs to children returning to temporary classrooms.

“Where the spotlight was once on the debris and the aftermath of this disaster, it has now shifted to The Salvation Army and its capacity to provide long-term relief efforts for this community in need,” said Lt. Colonel William Mockabee, Executive Director for SAWSO. “At SAWSO we seek opportunities to support the local Salvation Army – which has been serving the Nepal community since opening its doors in 2009 – and are privileged to fund this project that will develop temporary learning centers for children to get back to school.”

Electricity remains an issue for most mountain villages, particularly at night when steep ledges and terraced hillsides are now difficult to see and quite dangerous. The Salvation Army distributed 904 solar lamps to individuals and families in these areas to ensure their safety.

The Salvation Army’s valued relationship with Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has allowed emergency response teams to deliver relief items such as this to rural mountain areas. Additional support from The UPS Foundation allowed SAWSO to coordinate the shipment and delivery of 1,000 tents and mosquito nets.

Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. The Salvation Army has set up a designated fund for relief efforts in Nepal. To give, visit salar.my/Nepal or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769). Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office (designate “Nepal Earthquake”) can be sent to:

International Relief Fund
P.O. Box 418558
Boston, MA 02241-8558

In-kind donations are not being accepted.

The Salvation Army is committed to utilize philanthropic gifts in the manner donors desire. Occasionally, conditions in the field may alter relief activities. If this occurs, The Salvation Army will redirect funds to our International relief efforts in the area.

General Colin Powell

Colin Powell Delivers At Salvation Army Anniversary Luncheon

Colin Powell

Celebrating 150 Years of “Doing the Most Good”

This year marks the 150th anniversary of The Salvation Army organization worldwide and also commemorates 130 years serving in the Chicagoland area. As one of the oldest nonprofit organizations in the city, The Salvation Army Metropolitan Division is also one of the largest direct providers of social services locally.

To help celebrate the organizations anniversary was American statesman, philanthropist and military leader, General Colin Powell, USA (Ret.)  delivered the keynote address at an event celebrating The Salvation Army’s 150th worldwide anniversary at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers June 15.  His delivery was riveting, exciting in the least and most informative and insightful. He moved the audience to tears, laughter, somber repose,  inspired and touched them.

Also at the luncheon, Patricia Hemingway Hall, President and Chief Executive Officer of Health Care Service Corporation, will received the Salvation Army 2015 William Booth Award, the highest award that may be conferred upon an individual by The Salvation Army, and named after the organization’s founder. Past recipients of this award have included Bill Clinton, Senator Paul Simon, and Ambassador John Price, just to name a few. The Salvation Army honored Jewel-Osco with the 2015 “Others” Award for their long-term support as a corporate partner.

salvation army

Omaha Salvation Army Center

Omaha Salvation Army

Omaha Salvation Army center construction set to begin this month

The Omaha Salvation Army recently reached its $23.6 million capital campaign goal for the new building.

The new 70,000-square-foot center, called Renaissance Village, will be less than half the size of the current 110-year-old building, but still will house most of the programs that operated there.

The new building is expected to open in late 2016. Workers won’t tear down the existing building until Renaissance Village is complete.

bike across america

Bike across America 2 end hunger

bike across america 2 end hunger

SOUTH BEND – One of the hundreds of bikers out there today had an especially long trip.

This is Martin Cooper from the Salvation Army. His ride started all the way in  Medford, Oregon.

That’s more than two-thousand miles away and he is riding across the country to raise money and awareness to help end children’s hunger.

“I’ve been thinking about it for four or five years,” he said. “I just thought, when I retire, there has to be some way that I can help people. And you know, I don’t need to just go out and bug everybody in the community, so I thought I would ride across America.”

He plans to ride all the way to Washington DC – that will be a trip of 28-hundred miles.

He says he actually didn’t know about the Bike the Bend today. He was just planning to stop by the Kroc Center and he saw it on his way in.

Bike Across America 2 end Hunger

You can find more information about Martin over at his website on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/BikeAcrossAmerica2EndHunger

toarmina-salvation-army

Toarminas Pizza delivers 1,000 pizzas!

toarmina's-pizza-salvation-army

Toarminas Pizza delivers 1,000 pizzas!

Toarmina’s Pizza donated and delivered 1,000 pizzas to a number of Salvation Army Corps within the Downriver area.

The pizzas, valued at $10,000, are being made available to the Salvation Army as a fundraising instrument with pizza sales to Salvation Army supporters or as provisions to Salvation Army service customers.

Area Salvation Army’s that received the donation include Allen Park, Belleville, Lincoln Park, Romulus, Southgate, Taylor and Trenton.

“For 28 years, no matter our success, we’ve never forgotten those that make our communities safer and more livable,” Lou Toarmina, president of Toarmina’s Pizza, stated. “The Salvation Army is however one of many organizations we admire and help. Their work makes the lives of those that need them an incredible deal more helpful and safe.”

Fresh from donating $500 to the American Red Cross, Southeast Michigan Chapter last month, Toarmina mentioned the dedication of his firm and its individual proprietor-operators to Detroit and its neighbors is not going to stop.

The truth is, Toarmina looks forward to growing the number of shops – from its present 15 – all through Michigan over the following three years, each constructed with sturdy roots in each neighborhood that it serves.

donut day

Celebrate National Donut Day with free donuts from LaMar’s

free donutsLaMar’s Donuts is giving away free doughnuts in Fort Collins Friday to celebrate National Donut Day.

The Kansas City, Missouri-based company is partnering with Salvation Army to help raise money during the annual event. Donation kettles will be placed in participating LaMar’s locations including the two doughnut shops in Fort Collins — 1101 W. Drake Road and 140 E. Boardwalk Drive.

In addition to the donation kettles, LaMar’s will give a portion of this week’s sales to Salvation Army to support programs that provide meals to children in need. The company has 27 stores in throughout six states.

“The Salvation Army’s tireless mission to keep children clothed, sheltered and fed is an enduring reminder that many of our neighbors are in need,” LaMar’s spokesperson Temi Osifodunrin said in a statement. “LaMar’s is inviting communities we serve into our shops for free donuts and ask only that they consider donating to a praiseworthy cause.”

Customers aren’t required to make purchases to receive their free doughnuts Friday. The free-doughnut offer is good for any regular doughnut already available.

National Donut Day is celebrated the first Friday of June, a tradition dating to 1917, when women Salvation Army volunteers known as “Lassies” made doughnuts for soldiers on the front lines of World War I.

Dunkin’ Donuts is also celebrating the holiday by giving free doughnuts to customers who purchase beverages. On Oct. 28, the Massachusetts-based doughnut shop opened a location at 2801 S. College Ave, in Fort Collins.

By:Adrian D. Garcia

Kroc Center

National Study Quantifies Impact of Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Centers

Kroc Center

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (May 18, 2015) – Eleven years after Joan Kroc’s historic $1.5 billion bequest to The Salvation Army, 26 Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers are now open across the country, providing a variety of cultural, educational, fitness and social programs in neighborhoods that historically have lacked them. In a study commissioned by The Salvation Army, researchers at Partners for Sacred Places and McClanahan Associates, Inc. quantified the annual positive social and economic impact these centers are creating for and in their communities, totaling $258,178,776 (based on 2014 data).

Today, President Obama will visit the newest Kroc Center, in Camden, N.J., highlighting the impact that investment in facilities and programs like Kroc Centers can have on the long-term health of local communities.

The Kroc Centers are state-of-the-art venues typically located in underserved communities, where children and families can be exposed to a variety of people, activities and arts that would otherwise be beyond their reach. The Centers enhance quality of life by providing a safe environment with an emphasis on fitness and health, the arts and opportunities to build social connections.

“The research demonstrates in a quantifiable way the social and economic impact the Kroc Centers are having on people from the local community. They come, they get healthy, and they make important social connections. That’s the hallmark of what a Kroc Center is, and it creates a bona fide ‘Economic Halo Effect’ of positive benefits,” said Commissioner David Jeffrey, National Commander of The Salvation Army.

The study included the 25 Kroc Centers that had been open for at least six months by the end of 2014 (the Camden Kroc Center was not included because it opened in October 2014). The report is based on more than 100 interviews with staff, officers, participants, volunteers and community leaders; surveys of a representative sample of 1,580 patrons; and a review of operations-related documentation. Researchers looked at six areas:

  • $99,195,478 – Direct spending by the centers to hire a total of 797 full-time and 2,288 part-time staff, and to buy local goods and services
  • $70,601,194 – Invisible safety net: various catalyzing or leveraging economic values for center users including membership subsidies, scholarships, space and in-kind support to individuals and community-serving programs
  • $48,738,141 – The value of people getting and staying healthier
  • $30,986,249 – Magnet effect of induced spending in the local community by center visitors
  • $7,914,702 – The value of daycare programs that allow parents to work
  • $743,312 – Outdoor recreation space

“Anecdotally, we have understood from the outset that the Kroc Centers are fulfilling Joan Kroc’s vision of enriching lives,” said Commissioner Jeffrey. “We are blessed to have the scale and expertise to successfully implement her vision, and we are pleased that the ‘Economic Halo Effect’ report confirms and quantifies this real and ongoing benefit to the people and communities we serve.”

Separately, the study measures the one-time impact of construction-related spending for the 25 Kroc Centers studied, which exceeded $1.7 billion, with nearly 15,000 jobs created.

The study does not include quantitative measures of individual impact related to individual counseling that helped keep families together, taught social values and skills, helped people find jobs, and more. While real and effective in their impact, insufficient economic valuation models led the researchers to exclude these activities from the overall total.

“Between the one-time impact of construction and the ongoing impact of the centers’ operations, we are extremely pleased to confirm that our Kroc Centers have already in effect surpassed the value of this amazing gift and will keep on giving through annual impact in those communities,” continued Commissioner Jeffrey.

“We thank our donors, volunteers and community partners for the critical role they play in ensuring that these community benefits continue and grow year after year.”

About the Kroc Centers
In January 2004, The Salvation Army announced that Mrs. Kroc, widow of the McDonald’s franchise founder Ray Kroc, had bequeathed $1.5 billion to be separated equally among the organization’s four U.S. territories. The gift remains the second largest gift from an individual to a third party charity in American history.

Mrs. Kroc specifically directed The Salvation Army to use part of the money for endowments to help support the centers she envisioned across the United States, similar to the first Kroc Center she helped build in her hometown of San Diego with a gift of $90 million. That center continues to thrive, 13 years after its opening in a neighborhood that serves more than two dozen distinct ethnic groups.

Today, 26 Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers operate in communities across the United States and Puerto Rico.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to salvationarmyusa.org.