Transitioning from Response to Recovery After Hurricane Michael in Panama City

Panama City, FL – Since Hurricane Michael made landfall along the Florida Gulf coast on October 10, Salvation Army disaster teams have been mobilized, providing emergency relief to disaster survivors and rescue workers.  As the holiday season nears, The Salvation Army in Panama City is transitioning from response operations and beginning recovery programs.

“There is still plenty of work to be done,” said Major Otis Childs, commanding officer of The Salvation Army in Panama City.  “All you have to do is drive through Bay and Gulf counties to see that damage is still readily apparent.  But The Salvation Army has been serving this community since 1936.  We are not going anywhere.”

With the final day of mass feeding taking place on Sunday, November 18, The Salvation Army will be focused on supporting the recovery process.   The Salvation Army will continue to distribute emergency commodities — ranging from food to hygiene products to cleaning supplies – from its warehouse in Panama City.  These commodities will be shared with community partners, such as schools, churches and community organizations for distribution to disaster survivors.

The Salvation Army will also be providing emergency assistance to families to help them meet critical needs.  “We have always helped families during the holidays,” Childs continued. “Hurricane Michael might have forced us to change some of our traditional Christmas activities, but we will be providing disaster and holiday assistance to those who need help.  We need to make this season brighter for those impacted by Hurricane Michael.”

At the height of the relief operations, The Salvation Army deployed 75 mobile feeding units and two 54’ field kitchens to provide food to communities in Florida and Georgia impacted by Hurricane Michael.  Working with partners such as Operation BBQ Relief and Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, The Salvation Army has distributed more than 750,000 meals, 380,000 drinks, and 520,000 snacks.  Working with Therapy Dogs International, Salvation Army emotional and spiritual caregivers provided support to more than 47,000 people.  More than 20,000 food boxes, 6,000 clean-up kits, and 20,000 hygiene kits have been distributed with trained Salvation Army disaster workers and local volunteers giving more than 180,000 hours of disaster relief service to date.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Aids Students in Panama City After Hurricane Michael

Panama City, FL – Yesterday, a trio of Salvation Army disaster vehicles delivered food boxes, hygiene kits and prepackaged meals to A. Crawford Mosley High School in Panama City, FL for distribution to students impacted by Hurricane Michael.  As recovery from the October hurricane continues, The Salvation Army has been operating distribution sites across the Gulf coast region to distribute emergency supplies ranging from food and water to cleaning supplies.

“We received a call from the faculty of the school,” said Bobbi Geery, The Salvation Army’s Logistics Chief.  “Many students — who are just returning to school — are still living in storm-damaged houses.  Many are still without power, water or permanent housing.  The school asked if there was anything The Salvation Army could do to help.”

Help arrived as members of The Salvation Army’s Incident Management Team brought a delivery of 80 food boxes, 50 cases of hygiene kits, and 96 cases of meals-ready-to-eat.  The supplies were quickly unloaded with the help of students from the school, including the members of Mosley’s ROTC program.  The assistance brought tears to the eyes of some faculty members.  “This will be Thanksgiving for some of these students,” one teacher remarked.  The emergency supplies will be distributed by school faculty to students needing assistance.

In addition to delivering supplies to the school, The Salvation Army is continuing to staff other distribution points through Monday, November 19, including a site at FEMA’s Disaster Recovery Center at 898 West 11th Street, Panama City.  To date, The Salvation Army has distributed more 20,087 food boxes, 6,156 clean-up kits, and 20,446 personal hygiene kits across communities impacted by Hurricane Michael.

“Michael devastated Bay County and, for as large as our operation is, it’s impossible for The Salvation Army to reach everyone,” Geery continued.  “But there’s a whole network out there of schools, community organizations and local churches who are also in touch with the hurricane’s survivors.  By sharing our resources with these partners, we can reach many, many more people.”

How You Can Help

Response and recovery operations for Hurricane Michael are expected to be costly and continue for months to come. The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation.  Please support Salvation Army disaster relief efforts by donating:

  • By phone at 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769)
  • Online at www.HelpSalvationArmy.org
  • Donate by mail at The Salvation Army, PO Box 1959, Atlanta, GA.Please designate ‘2018 Hurricanes – Michael’ on all checks.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Service Update for the Florida Panhandle

Tallahassee, FL (November 16, 2018) –The Salvation Army continues its efforts to meet the needs of the Florida Panhandle almost five weeks following Hurricane Michael. Today 22 mobile feeding units with crews of food service workers and emotional and spiritual care specialists are working to feed, hydrate, and give hope to people impacted by Hurricane Michael. The Salvation Army continues to partner with the Southern Baptist Disaster Relief in Panama City for meal preparation for distribution through mobile feeding units.

The Salvation Army is also distributing hygiene kits, MRE’s (meals ready-to-eat), food boxes, cleaning supplies and tarps. Midwest Food Bank continues to provide food boxes and hygiene kits for distribution. 

Sunday, November 18 will be the last day for Salvation Army meal service and Monday, Novemer 19 will be the last day for distribution of supplies.

Total Stats as of November 16, 2018

  • Meals: 675,411
  • Drinks: 329,839
  • Snacks: 473,371
  • Hygiene Kits: 17,264
  • Food Boxes: 12,415
  • Tarps: 10,112
  • Clean-up Kits: 3,774
  • 42,775 emotional and spiritual care contacts with hurricane survivors

How People Can Help

  • 100-percent of designated gifts will be used in support of those affected by Hurricane Michael.
  • Response efforts to this hurricane and flooding are expected to be costly and last for years. The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation.
  • Donate by phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769)
  • Donate by mail: The Salvation Army, PO Box 1959, Atlanta, GA (Please designate ‘2018 Hurricanes – Michael’ on all checks.)
  • Donate online: www.HelpSalvationArmy.org
  • Donate by text: Text STORM to 51555 to receive a donation link for easy mobile giving

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Service Update for the Florida Panhandle

Tampa, FL (November 13, 2018) – Four weeks after Hurricane Michael devastated the Florida Panhandle, The Salvation Army continues its service to communities impacted by the storm. There is a new normal in many communities. Families are coming home to places they can no longer live. The pre-existing financial struggles of households are compounded by the hurricane. The need for safe, sanitary, affordable housing is greater than ever as many families lost their homes and have to rebuild. Salvation Army officers and staff are at work with community partners to help ease the burdens of the people who are in the most need.

Power is restored in most areas where the infrastructure allows, which means grocery stores are opening and households can now cook and keep food cold. Salvation Army mass feeding has concluded in the Apalachicola and Tallahassee service areas, but local Salvation Army is still at work, helping as it was before Hurricane Michael.  

The Panama City service area of Bay County was the hardest hit. Service there continues and today, 23 mobile feeding units and emotional and spiritual care teams are at work in the area , assessing the needs of the communities as they provide hope and prayer. In some instances the hope they give is through a laugh or a bottle of water; other times the care is a prayer, a Bible, and a shoulder to lean on as folks come back to their destroyed communities and homes.

“We are not just a bottle of cold water or a warm meal. We provide spiritual support and prayer for people whose lives are changed by disaster,” said Steven Hartsook, emergency disaster services director of The Salvation Army of Florida. “We are here to serve in the name of Jesus Christ and will be here as long as we are needed.”

At the peak of service, 45 mobile feeding units and teams from the Southern Territory and leadership teams from across the nation and Canada were serving the areas devastated by the hurricane. To date, The Salvation Army has served:

  • Meals: 657,655
  • Drinks: 323,451
  • Snacks: 458,585
  • Hygiene Kits: 16,053
  • Food Boxes: 12,007
  • Tarps: 9,667
  • Clean-up Kits: 3,774
  • 42,473 emotional and spiritual care contacts with hurricane survivors
  • Salvation Army officers, employees, and volunteers have provided 63,811 hours of disaster service.

Disaster strikes rural towns and big cities, the young, the old, the rich, the poor, and in-between. The Salvation Army is on the ground, serving in the name of Jesus Christ without discrimination.

In the weeks, months, and years ahead we will still be there serving those who need us the most. We can do this because you support us.

How You Can Help

  • 100-percent of designated gifts will be used in support of those affected by Hurricane Michael.
  • Response efforts to this hurricane and flooding are expected to be costly and last for years. The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation.
  • Donate by phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769)
  • Donate by mail: The Salvation Army, PO Box 1959, Atlanta, GA (Please designate ‘2018 Hurricanes – Michael’ on all checks.)
  • Donate online: www.HelpSalvationArmy.org
  • Donate by text: Text STORM to 51555 to receive a donation link for easy mobile giving

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Distributes Backpacks to Students Affected by Hurricane Michael

Panama City, FL (November 10, 2018)–Monday, November 5, was the first day of school – again – for many in Panama City, Fla., after Hurricane Michael forced students out for close to a month. But the classroom looks different.

“Some children are living in shelters. Some have moved away. Some are sleeping on couches with friends. Others have lost entire homes,” says Kevin McCoy, a pre-kindergarten teacher.

For a lot of schools, there were 50 percent less students than they had before the hurricane.

“Children need normalcy,” says McCoy. “It’s a war zone here. There isn’t much left of this city.”

In McCoy’s classroom, shelves that were once filled with backpacks, school supplies and personal items now sit empty. “Many of these children have been left with nothing,” says McCoy. “It’s gut-wrenching.”

To help his students move forward, McCoy contacted The Salvation Army for help with backpacks and school supplies.

“Giving a backpack to a child who has been through trauma such as this is more than about pencils and crayons,” says McCoy.  “It’s about stability, restoration, and says that someone cares.”

 A survivor himself, McCoy says it’s great to be back in the classroom.  

“Thinking about the children helped me get through the storm,” says McCoy. “I needed to see them and to know there were OK.”

McCoy says he is still working through his own painful memories.

“The eye of the storm came over my house,” says McCoy. “My roof caved in and there is water damage. I’ve lost 60 percent of my possessions and am still cleaning out debris. It was scary and unlike anything I’ve ever seen.”

While McCoy works through his own rebuilding, he wants to ensure he gives hope to his students for the future.

“The Salvation Army has met our classroom needs, which is absolutely wonderful,” says McCoy. “Everyone, including the children, has been traumatized. The backpacks give us all something to smile about.”

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Helps a Seaside Community Wiped Out by Hurricane Michael

Mexico Beach, FL (November 9, 2018)--In the seaside community of Mexico Beach, Florida, the scenes of devastation are almost unreal. One month after hurricane Michael demolished most of the town, Salvation Army disaster workers continue to help survivors who are still digging out.

“It was horrifying to watch the ocean come down the driveway of our mobile home park,” says owner, Christine Brinkmeier. “I thought it was a tsunami. I didn’t want to die.”

Entire blocks of homes near the beach were wiped out. Rows and rows of other homes were turned into piles of splintered lumber. Roofs were torn away and fallen trees lay on top of mobile homes.

“The storm moved fast and got intense quickly,” says Brinkmeier, who hunkered down with nine others in the parks administrative office. 

“Winds and debris whipped by,” says Brinkmeier. “Then the nine-foot water surge came. Waves were higher than the building. “

After the hurricane, and as soon as the roads began to clear, The Salvation Army was on the scene with a roving canteen that delivered meals, hygiene kits and supplies.

“We cheer when we see the canteen,” says Brinkmeier. “It is fantastic that The Salvation Army comes every day with delicious hot food and cleaning kits. We’ve lost so much. For all we know our belongings could be on the other side of town.”

The devastating impact of hurricane Michael was gut-wrenching.

Mike Kingrass and his wife were served meals by The Salvation Army during clean-up of their seasonal home.

“We arrived five days after the hurricane to find the lower level of our home demolished,” says Kingrass. “It was total devastation. We walked into a mucky, swampy, smelly mess.”

Mike and his wife spend their days cleaning out debris, discarding furniture and calling insurance adjusters and contractors.

“We have so much to discard and clean,” says Mike. “We don’t have time to think about cooking and when we do, we don’t have the energy. We are so grateful for The Salvation Army canteen and the hot meals they deliver.”

“Challenges are the same for everyone in the community and clean-up takes an emotional toll. The Salvation Army is doing a wonderful job helping people. I’m just thankful our town wasn’t completely blown away.”

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Hurricane Michael Service Update for Florida Panhandle

Tallahassee, FL (November 7, 2018) –The Salvation Army continues its efforts to meet the needs of the Florida Panhandle almost four weeks following Hurricane Michael. Today 43 mobile feeding units with crews of food service workers and emotional and spiritual care specialists are working to feed, hydrate, and give hope to people impacted by Hurricane Michael. The Salvation Army is also distributing hygiene kits, MRE’s (meals ready-to-eat), food boxes, cleaning supplies and tarps.

Life is returning to a new normal in communities in the Florida Panhandle. Power is restored in most areas where the infrastructure allows. Power restoration means that grocery stores are opening and households can now cook and keep food cold. In those areas, the number of fixed feeding locations is decreasing and mobile feeding units are roving through the area looking for neighborhoods and communities who still need support.

Yesterday in Panama City, The Salvation Army distributed 51 pallets of supplies in the community and served more than 11,000 meals to disaster survivors. The Salvation Army has served more than 599,400 meals to storm survivors across the Panhandle since October 11.

The Salvation AArmy continues to partner with Operation BBQ Relief and Southern Baptist Disaster Relief to provide meals for distribution through mobile feeding units. Midwest Food Bank will continue to provide food boxes and hygiene kits for distribution. 

Total Stats as of November 7, 2018

  • Meals: 599,421
  • Drinks: 294,285
  • Snacks: 409,576
  • Hygiene Kits: 12,183
  • Food Boxes: 7,929
  • Tarps: 7,164
  • Clean-up Kits: 2,957
  • 38,474 emotional and spiritual care contacts with hurricane survivors

How People Can Help

  • 100-percent of designated gifts will be used in support of those affected by Hurricane Michael.
  • Response efforts to this hurricane and flooding are expected to be costly and last for years. The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation.
  • Donate by phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769)
  • Donate by mail: The Salvation Army, PO Box 1959, Atlanta, GA (Please designate ‘2018 Hurricanes – Michael’ on all checks.)
  • Donate online: www.HelpSalvationArmy.org
  • Donate by text: Text STORM to 51555 to receive a donation link for easy mobile giving

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army in Panama City Brings Church to Hurricane Michael Volunteers

Panama City, FL (November 5, 2018) – It was a pause. It was encouraging. On Sunday, November 4, three services were held at various locations throughout the day in Panama City to help maintain the emotional and spiritual health of volunteers and other Salvation Army personnel, even in the midst of providing services and support to those affected by Hurricane Michael.

“At the request of FEMA, The Salvation Army was pleased and grateful to offer interdenominational church services (in conjunction with the Red Cross chaplain) that were well-received for the more than 100 people who attended,” says Major Roxzena Hayden, Emotional and Spiritual Care Specialist.

Hayden is a member of a Canadian Salvation Army Incident Management Team (IMT) that is currently supporting operations in the Florida Panhandle.

Maintaining the emotional and spiritual health of our volunteers and other personnel is critical,” says Hayden. “When volunteers give and give they can easily get exhausted. And when you are tired you can’t provide the support that others need. Our church service was one way we could help people clear their thoughts and reduce stress levels.”

Karen, a volunteer chaplain, was thankful to have the time to recharge. 

“I’ve been accompanying one of our canteens for the past seven days,” says Karen. “I will be here for two weeks. My role is to provide emotional and spiritual support to people who are accessing our services. The stories I am hearing and the devastation I’ve seen are heartbreaking. Sometimes listening and talking draws on my energy. Church and God are a great way to refuel.”

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Emergency Disaster Service Teams Focus on Bulk Distribution in Georgia

BAINBRIDGE, GA (November 5, 2018) –The Salvation Army continues to serve the needs of people impacted by Hurricane Michael as South Georgians rebuild their homes and communities almost a month after Hurricane Michael swept through Georgia. The hurricane cut a wide swath of destruction across the entire state from the southeastern corner in Bainbridge, northeastward toward Augusta. At the height of the emergency disaster services, 21 Salvation Army mobile feeding units (canteens) were in operation with 87 responding Salvation Army officers, employees and trained volunteers from three divisions (Georgia, National Capitol/Virginia, Alabama-Louisiana-Mississippi), and the Central Territory.

To date in Georgia, over 58,000 meals and 79,000 drinks and snacks have been served, and 4,000 people have been assisted with emotional and spiritual care. In addition, over 6,500 food boxes, 3,600 cases of water, 2,100 hygiene kits and 2,300 clean-up kits have been distributed.

Last week, The Salvation Army in Georgia focused its operations on bulk distribution of supplies in the Albany and Bainbridge areas. Hundreds of cars snaked through parking lots and along roadsides, guided by Salvation Army and local police, to secure much-needed supplies.

“Many of these people will experience unanticipated financial hardships because of the hurricane,” says Lanita Lloyd, Director of The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services in Georgia. “These supplies will help people restock their pantries and allow them to use their money for personal recovery.”

At a point-of-distribution set up at a middle school in Bainbridge, Georgia, car after car with their doors and trunks open drove by a well-coordinated line of trucks and stacked supplies as Salvation Army personnel and volunteers filled the vehicles with supplies.

“Anyone negatively impacted by the hurricane is eligible for these supplies,” says Incident Management Team Commander, Major Ray Morton.

Supplies available to those impacted by Hurricane Michael included; cases of water, food boxes, boxes of snack foods, brooms and mops, cleaning kits, frozen beef and chicken, health and beauty kits, and paper products.

Words of gratitude permeate out from inside the vehicles as they pass the line of Salvation Army personnel. “Thank you!” says one lady with a backseat filled with young children. “I don’t know what I’d do without The Salvation Army.”

“These are my people and this is my community,” says Stacy Warren, Service Director for The Salvation Army in Bainbridge, Georgia. “Our community has never seen anything like this. You just don’t expect a hurricane to strike 150 miles from the coast.”

“To see how our community has come alongside The Salvation Army to partner with us in relief operations is just amazing,” says Warren, who has been working with her Salvation Army teams since the day after Hurricane Michael slammed through South Georgia. “We are committed to being there for people in their time of need, whenever that is – whether it’s a literal hurricane or a personal storm of life.”

In the weeks ahead, The Salvation Army’s disaster relief operation will transition toward long-term relief efforts, and activities will be consolidated back to the local Salvation Army Corps and Service Centers.

How to Help

The best way to help survivors and relief workers is to make a financial contribution. Monetary donations allow disaster responders to immediately meet the specific needs of disaster survivors.

Donate By Phone:  1-800-725-2769  (1-800-SAL-ARMY)
Donate By Mail: The Salvation Army PO BOX 1959 Atlanta, GA 30301
             Please designate 2018 Hurricanes – Michael on your check
Donate Online: helpsalvationarmy.org
Donate By Text:
Text STORM to 51555 to receive a donation link for easy mobile giving

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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Salvation Army Team from Canada Serving in Panama City, Florida

PANAMA CITY, FL (November 4, 2018) – A team of 12 Salvation Army emergency disaster personnel from Canada have their boots on the ground to manage operations in the Florida Panhandle as residents continue to cope with the destruction and devastation from Hurricane Michael.  

“We are extremely grateful to have our Canadian counterparts managing operations in Panama City,” says Steven Hartsook, Divisional Disaster Service Director, The Salvation Army of Florida. “The presence of the Canadian Incident Management Team (IMT) ensures we can continue with our operations and service delivery.”

Members of the Canadian team come from across the country and some have previously been deployed to help The Salvation Army’s response to Hurricane Harvey and Irma.

“The team comes with a complement of varied experience and willingness to serve,” says Carolynn Barkhouse, Incident Commander. “We want to provide supportive services that people need to rebuild their lives. We want to simply walk alongside them as they work to establish a new “normal” and reclaim hope for the future.”

In Canada, The Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services program began back in December 1917 in response to the Halifax Disaster. As one of Canada’s major emergency relief organizations, The Salvation Army is often assigned specific roles by emergency preparedness authorities to incidents of various sizes and scopes.

“It’s been over three weeks since Michael made landfall and our personnel have worked tirelessly to provide food, emotional and spiritual care, and cleaning supplies,” says Hartsook. “We are seeing an increase in the distribution of bulk product such as food boxes, clean-up kits and tarps,” says Hartsook. “This is a city that needs long-term help.”

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need without discrimination for more than 135 years in the U.S. More than 25 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. The Salvation Army tracks the level of need across the country with the Human Needs Index (HumanNeedsIndex.org). The Salvation Army has served survivors of every major national disaster since 1900. The Salvation Army does not place an administrative fee on disaster donations. During emergency disasters, 100 percent of designated gifts are used to support specific relief efforts. For more information, go to www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or follow on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS.

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