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nepal relief

Salvation Army Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

This post was contributed by The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO)

The Salvation Army continues to serve communities in and around Kathmandu following two earthquakes on April 25 and May 12 that killed 8,787 people and destroyed more than 500,000 homes.

Emergency response teams of The Salvation Army have been serving survivors in the urban and rural areas with operations revolving around camps for displaced people, including camp management roles and the provision of food, shelter, and water. Teams are also assisting many remote mountainous villages that are now isolated due to landslides from the earthquakes and subsequent rains from monsoons.

The Salvation Army has so far distributed 148 metric tons of food – including rice, oil, lentils and salt – to survivors, as many people have lost all of their food. This support will sustain families until the upcoming harvest. Additionally, hundreds of hygiene and sanitation items were distributed.

Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

“This disaster response is especially complicated due to the remote and rugged nature of the terrain in Nepal, making the delivery of aid especially challenging,” said Betsy Baldwin, Disaster Technical Advisor for The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO). “This has meant greater coordination and creativity has been required to reach remote communities and ensure that the limited amount of assistance does not duplicate the work of others.”

Funding from SAWSO is supporting the development of temporary housing and learning centers in the place of schools that were damaged in the earthquake. Approximately 3,000 tarps were distributed to community members needing covered living space and temporary learning spaces while schools are reconstructed.

In continued support of schooling in the area, The Salvation Army provided 850 educational stationery packs to children returning to temporary classrooms.

“Where the spotlight was once on the debris and the aftermath of this disaster, it has now shifted to The Salvation Army and its capacity to provide long-term relief efforts for this community in need,” said Lt. Colonel William Mockabee, Executive Director for SAWSO. “At SAWSO we seek opportunities to support the local Salvation Army – which has been serving the Nepal community since opening its doors in 2009 – and are privileged to fund this project that will develop temporary learning centers for children to get back to school.”

Electricity remains an issue for most mountain villages, particularly at night when steep ledges and terraced hillsides are now difficult to see and quite dangerous. The Salvation Army distributed 904 solar lamps to individuals and families in these areas to ensure their safety.

The Salvation Army’s valued relationship with Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has allowed emergency response teams to deliver relief items such as this to rural mountain areas. Additional support from The UPS Foundation allowed SAWSO to coordinate the shipment and delivery of 1,000 tents and mosquito nets.

Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. The Salvation Army has set up a designated fund for relief efforts in Nepal. To give, visit salar.my/Nepal or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769). Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office (designate “Nepal Earthquake”) can be sent to:

International Relief Fund
P.O. Box 418558
Boston, MA 02241-8558

In-kind donations are not being accepted.

The Salvation Army is committed to utilize philanthropic gifts in the manner donors desire. Occasionally, conditions in the field may alter relief activities. If this occurs, The Salvation Army will redirect funds to our International relief efforts in the area.

Salvation Army Civic Lunch 061515

Colin Powell Delivers At Salvation Army Anniversary Luncheon

Colin Powell

Celebrating 150 Years of “Doing the Most Good”

This year marks the 150th anniversary of The Salvation Army organization worldwide and also commemorates 130 years serving in the Chicagoland area. As one of the oldest nonprofit organizations in the city, The Salvation Army Metropolitan Division is also one of the largest direct providers of social services locally.

To help celebrate the organizations anniversary was American statesman, philanthropist and military leader, General Colin Powell, USA (Ret.)  delivered the keynote address at an event celebrating The Salvation Army’s 150th worldwide anniversary at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers June 15.  His delivery was riveting, exciting in the least and most informative and insightful. He moved the audience to tears, laughter, somber repose,  inspired and touched them.

Also at the luncheon, Patricia Hemingway Hall, President and Chief Executive Officer of Health Care Service Corporation, will received the Salvation Army 2015 William Booth Award, the highest award that may be conferred upon an individual by The Salvation Army, and named after the organization’s founder. Past recipients of this award have included Bill Clinton, Senator Paul Simon, and Ambassador John Price, just to name a few. The Salvation Army honored Jewel-Osco with the 2015 “Others” Award for their long-term support as a corporate partner.

salvation army

Construction to Begin on New Omaha Salvation Army Center

Omaha Salvation Army

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Construction will begin early next month on a new Omaha Salvation Army center near 36th and Cuming Streets in Omaha.

The Salvation Army recently reached its $23.6 million capital campaign goal for the new building.

The new 70,000-square-foot center, called Renaissance Village, will be less than half the size of the current 110-year-old building, but still will house most of the programs that operated there.

The new building is expected to open in late 2016. Workers won’t tear down the existing building until Renaissance Village is complete.

bike across america

Bike across America to end hunger

 

 

bike-across-america

SOUTH BEND – One of the hundreds of bikers out there today had an especially long trip.

This is Martin Cooper from the Salvation Army. His ride started all the way in  Medford, Oregon.

That’s more than two-thousand miles away and he is riding across the country to raise money and awareness to help end children’s hunger.

“I’ve been thinking about it for four or five years,” he said. “I just thought, when I retire, there has to be some way that I can help people. And you know, I don’t need to just go out and bug everybody in the community, so I thought I would ride across America.”

He plans to ride all the way to Washington DC – that will be a trip of 28-hundred miles.

He says he actually didn’t know about the Bike the Bend today. He was just planning to stop by the Kroc Center and he saw it on his way in.

You can find more information about Martin over at his website on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/BikeAcrossAmerica2EndHunger

toarmina-salvation-army

1,000 pizzas to Salvation Army Corps courtesy of Toarmina’s Pizza

toarmina's-pizza-salvation-armyToarmina’s Pizza donated and delivered 1,000 pizzas to several Salvation Army Corps in the Downriver area.

The pizzas, valued at $10,000, are being made available to the Salvation Army as a fundraising tool with pizza sales to Salvation Army supporters or as provisions to Salvation Army service consumers.

Area Salvation Army’s that received the donation include Allen Park, Belleville, Lincoln Park, Romulus, Southgate, Taylor and Trenton.

“For 28 years, regardless of our success, we have never forgotten those who make our communities safer and more livable,” Lou Toarmina, president of Toarmina’s Pizza, said. “The Salvation Army is but one of the organizations we admire and support. Their work makes the lives of those who need them a great deal more helpful and secure.”

Fresh from donating $500 to the American Red Cross, Southeast Michigan Chapter last month, Toarmina said the dedication of his company and its individual owner-operators to Detroit and its neighbors will not cease.

In fact, Toarmina looks forward to growing the number of stores – from its current 15 – throughout Michigan over the next three years, each built with strong roots in every community that it serves.

Source: Bsharah Public Relations

mission statement

Salvation Army captains bid farewell, extend thanks to community

After more than three years overseeing the Bartow County service area, Salvation Army Capts. Lee and Michelle Wilson will bid farewell June 21.

“We received our orders to move to the divisional headquarters of the Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi division of The Salvation Army,” Michelle Wilson said. “Our office will be located in Jackson, Miss. Our roles in Jackson will be in finance for myself and program for Lee.

“We are so grateful for the many blessings we have received from serving here in Bartow County. We could not have met the many challenges and opportunities that came our way without the support of the community. We truly say from the bottom of our hearts, ‘Thank you for your support.’”

She continued, “I have been amazed since our first few days here about how giving this community is, especially when it comes to nonprofits. Our kettle effort is a testimony of this, as we run a 55 percent volunteer driven effort. This far exceeds the standard of many other Salvation Army commands both small and large.”

Extending thanks to the community, the Wilsons said they were continuously impressed by the public’s willingness to help their neighbors in need.

“I think my most memorable moment is how God has provided over and over again through the generosity of others,” Michelle Wilson said. “In nonprofit work, you can be tempted to walk by sight and be discouraged by the great needs around you, but we know that as Christians we walk by faith in expectancy of what will be done for us.

“We have been, at many times throughout our 3 1/2 years, unsure of how we would meet the needs of our neighbors in need but just at the right time, the heart of a caring volunteer or generous donor would be led to support us in exactly the way that was needed.”

Operating in Cartersville since 1995, The Salvation Army — an evangelical part of the universal Christian church — aided more than 11,000 people last year with various services, such as food, financial assistance and youth character building programs. While the thrift store closed April 30, the nonprofit will hold monthly sales in the future to support The Salvation Army’s programs and services.

“In 2014, The Salvation Army served 11,324 people right here in Bartow County. That, based on 2013’s population is 11.18 percent of Bartow County that is being served by The Salvation Army,” Michelle Wilson said. “Each and every day we provide basic needs, such as food, toiletries, prescription assistance, utility assistance and disaster services.

“We also serve underprivileged children each week through our youth character building programs, which provide life skills to youth K [through] 12. Lastly, we offer our seasonal services that provide toys and clothing through the Angel Tree program to children in need, opportunities for children to attend weeklong summer camps as well as community care outreach to shut-ins throughout the county.”

In addition to The Salvation Army’s donors and recipients, Bartow’s church community also has made a lasting impression on Lee Wilson.
“Bartow County is a county that prays,” he said. “Last year my wife and I were present at the National Day of Prayer service that was held outside of the courthouse. While there, we learned of the Bible being read cover to cover in various places in the county, and we thought that was amazing. So amazing, that this year, we took our youth group to one of the locations to participate in this reading. Seeing our young people taking part in this event was something I will never forget.”

On June 28, the Wilsons’ successors — Capts. Scott and Michelle Lyles — will start serving the Salvation Army’s Cartersville Corps.

“This transition of leadership in The Salvation Army is something that happens every so often,” Lee Wilson said. “Capts. Scott and Michelle Lyles are two very capable officers, and I know that they are not only praying for their new community, but looking forward to joining the Bartow County family. It is my hope and prayer that you will embrace them as you did us, and continue to support the work of The Salvation Army as they continue to do the work that our Lord and Savior has called us all to do.”

For more information about supporting the Salvation Army, located at 16 Felton Place, call 770-386-6256 or send the nonprofit a message via its Facebook page, The Salvation Army – Cartersville, Ga.

 

Original Article can be seen here

liz murray

Harvard graduate born into poverty and homeless as a teen shares her story

liz murrayWhen Liz Murray overcame homelessness to graduate from Harvard University, people called her a bootstrapper and lauded her hard work.

But hard work doesn’t tell the whole story, said Murray, the featured speaker at today’s D.J.’s Hero Awards luncheon sponsored by the Salvation Army.

There has to be a bridge — someone or something offering help and encouragement, she said. That could be a committed social worker, a friendly stranger, a scholarship fund.

“When you have that, an introduction to a person who can help you, it’s a bridge that turns hard work into opportunity,” she said.

In an interview Monday, Murray said it’s up to the community to be that bridge: “Nobody is off the hook.”

She said today’s Salvation Army event is part of the solution. Eight high school seniors each will receive a $10,000 scholarship at the luncheon. The awards are named after D.J. Sokol, the son of David and Peggy Sokol, who contributed to his school and community despite battling cancer. He died in 1999 at age 18.

Murray said she had lots of help and inspiration along her path. She went from being a homeless teen who missed school 75 percent of the time to making up lost courses in two years and winning a New York Times scholarship to the Ivy League school.

She was born in grinding poverty to drug-addicted parents, but she never was angry at them. Instead, she viewed the addiction as a terrible thing that happened to the family, which included a sister.

“I had an instinct for the fact that they were sick,” she said. “People can’t give what they don’t have.”

Despite that, they gave her plenty. She was grateful she grew up with two parents who showed her an abundance of love. With regular trips to the public library, her dad — who had two college degrees — planted the idea that education was a way out. Her mom taught her to dream when she shared her own dreams with her daughter at night.

In a roundabout way, they taught her to be independent. “I never expected people to do things, because no one did,” Murray said.

At age 13 she ended up in a difficult group home when her mom was hospitalized with end-stage AIDS. Dad was in a homeless shelter, and her sister lived with friends. By 15, she was homeless herself.

Her mom’s dreams of becoming sober and owning a home died when AIDS claimed her life. Murray took that as a signal that she should get serious about school to preserve her own dreams. She graduated from the Humanities Preparatory Academy in Manhattan despite a still-precarious living situation.

Strangers who read her story in the Times showed up to help: bringing brownies, cards, a homemade quilt. One woman drove from New Jersey each week to do her laundry.

Now, she said, she tries to do the same for teens in similar situations. She works with youths from Covenant House, the largest organization for homeless teens in the country. She looks for ways to introduce them to people who want to help with jobs, internships and other aid.

“I love to see people’s dreams come true,” she said.

She turned that coaching into a full-time business, but recently stepped back to have a family and pursue a doctorate in psychology from Columbia University.

She’ll share her story with the 1,100 people expected for today’s luncheon at the CenturyLink Center. She finds inspiration in the stories of each winner in the award’s 15-year history. They all have much to contribute, she said.

It’s up to everyone to help more young people figure that out, she said.

“One thing I hear people say constantly, when they’re talking about the ills of the world, is that someone needs to do something — ‘they’ need to do something. I ask: Do you realize there’s no ‘they?’ ”

women of dedication

Women of Dedication Honored

women of dedication

The 50th Women of Dedication presented by The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary was held on April 7 at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront. Fifteen women were recognized for their support to the San Diego community. Honoree Dr. Elisabeth Jones was unable to attend and is not included in the photo. Proceeds raised at the event are designated for the Haven Program at the Door of Hope. Other funds raised bringing the total net to $200,000, go to the programs supported by the Auxiliary. Corporate Sponsors for the luncheon included San Diego Foundation, SDG&E/Sempra Energy, San Diego Chargers, Ahern Seeds, Sycuan Casino and Union Bank.

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Salvation Army accepting donations for Nepal earthquake victims

20150428NepalEarthquake

Donations for Nepal are being accepted

The Salvation Army is mobilizing emergency response personnel and supplies after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Nepal flattened homes and buildings, causing widespread damage across the region and killing more than 2,000 people.

With more than 75 offices throughout the area, volunteers and staff are well-prepared to service the immediate and long-term needs of those impacted by natural disasters. Since 1882, the Salvation Army has served the people of its India Eastern territory.

“Donations from the generous public will help provide basic necessities that survivors desperately need right now,” said Lt. Col. Ron Busroe, the Salvation Army’s national community relations and development secretary. “But the effects of this tragedy will be felt for months – even years. We know that emotional and spiritual counseling is equally important for survivors to deal with the gravity of the situation.”

Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. The Salvation Army has set up a designated fund in which 100 percent of gifts will go to relief efforts in Nepal. To donate, visit salar.my/Nepal or call 800-SAL-ARMY.

Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office, designated for “Nepal Earthquake,” can be sent to: Salvation Army World Service Office, International Relief Fund, P.O. Box 418558, Boston, MA 02241-8558.

In-kind donations are not being accepted.

Kroc-Center

Hampton Roads Kroc Center – The Salvation Army is about to celebrate it’s 1-year anniversary.

Kroc-Center

The Salvation Army is about to celebrate a big anniversary, and it’s bringing in NFL Hall-of-Famer Emmitt Smith to lead the charge.

“We’re glad he’s coming to share the message of hope for young people to do the right thing. Build character,” said Major Stephen Long of the Salvation Army.

The Hampton Roads Kroc Center is at 1401 Ballentine Blvd. in Norfolk in the Broad Creek area. It’s a massive, positive place for children and families to get involved in programs together — from weight lifting at the gym to fitness classes to basketball to swimming in the giant indoor water park. There are music classes and character-building classes.

But the part of the Kroc Center that’s the favorite of 8 year-old Tye Austin might surprise you — church services.

“It’s fun and I like the service,” Tye said. “I learn how to behave better and how to respect parents better.”

Learning Christian values and becoming better individuals is something they value at the Kroc Center. Each year they hold a black-tie fundraising dinner to help families with membership fees. Last year’s dinner raised $96,000 and they hope to top that that this Thursday by bringing in the Super Bowl champ, who got his start in athletics participating in programs at the Salvation Army community center where he grew up.