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pope

The Pope says Salvationists and Catholics meet at peripheries of society

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History was made with the first private audience in the Vatican with Pope Francis and the General of The Salvation Army. General André Cox met the Pontiff who said that theological differences do not impede the witness of a shared love of God and neighbor. He also spoke of his first encounter, as a 4 year old, with Salvation Army Officers which, he said, stirred in him a sense of ecumenical outreach beyond the teachings of the Catholic Church in that era.

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Read the full article here

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Dillard’s Stores and The Salvation Army Drive to Do Good

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It’s no secret that it has become unseasonably cold for many parts of The United States. And with the temperatures continuing to drop, it’s time to bundle up.

This year, as you transition to your warmer wardrobe, consider freeing up some space in those cluttered closets and drawers by donating any jackets and coats you no longer wear to help support families who cannot afford proper winter attire.
Thanks to the generosity of Dillard’s Department Stores, The Salvation Army is helping to fill this need. This Saturday, November 22, select Dillard’s locations will host a one-day coat drive benefiting The Salvation Amy- and they need your help.

Visit one of the 86 participating stores this weekend and bring in any gently used coats and receive a token of appreciation from Dillard’s.
Just by clearing out your closet, you can make a huge difference in someone’s life.

If there is not a Dillard’s in your area, you can always donate gently used or new coats to your local Salvation Army Family Store. Just visit www.satruck.org and find the closet location near you.
A special thank you to Dillard’s for their generosity and support of The Salvation Army’s mission to Do The Most Good!
Dillard’s,The Salvation Amy, coat drive

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Salvation Army begins Red Kettle campaign

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BENTONVILLE, Ark. —Volunteers, Bentonville city leaders and the Salvation Army will gather at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Harp’s Grocery Store in Bentonville to kick off the Red Kettle campaign.

The campaign will start the donation and fundraising season for the Salvation Army which receives most of its yearly budget during the months of November and December.

Most of the budget helps create a Christmas to remember for more than 2,000 less-fortunate children in Northwest Arkansas.

Donations will also help its programs that help the less-fortunate, those dealing with drug and alcohol problems and its shelters in Fayetteville and Bentonville.

In addition to donations, the Salvation Army is also looking for volunteers.

People can volunteer their time online or sponsor a kettle by going to the website redkettlevolunteer.org

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A Run Toward Recovery

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Denver Adult Rehabilitation Center’s physical health regimen

This story was originally featured in Caring Magazine, a publication of The Salvation Army Western Territory.

Sarah Lewis lived an active lifestyle. An avid runner and soccer player, she couldn’t recall a time when athletics weren’t a part of her life. However, after she finished high school she began using drugs, which grew into an addiction. Consequently, her physical health suffered and her passion for physical fitness dwindled.

“I lost that part of myself in my addiction,” Lewis said. She eventually enrolled in Denver’s Adult Rehabilitation Center (ARC), where she received treatment and rediscovered her affinity for exercise.

Last May, the Denver ARC joined with Feet on the Street, which organizes 5K and 10K races in Denver, to develop a running program that includes semi-weekly training, nutritional advice, health supplements and activewear for interested beneficiaries. Currently, 20 men and eight women participate in the program.

“There is the holistic impact on mind, body and spirit,” Nick Sterner, Feet on the Street owner and member of the Denver ARC’s Advisory Council, said of running. “The way the program is designed offers beneficiaries an opportunity to engage in a healthy, active lifestyle and effectively puts them in touch with a community that is making positive health choices.”
At the start, many struggle to run a quarter of a mile in Denver with its challenging mile-high elevation. Yet, Sterner said in a few weeks of training, the participants advance to running up to three miles.

“If we can latch on early, you see a lot of [the beneficiaries] translate the incremental goal setting of athletics into other areas of their lives,” Sterner said. “We’ve had a lot of guys tell us that [fitness] is why they stay in the [ARC] program.”

Exercise lowers stress levels and releases endorphins, which can alleviate depression, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Exercise also engages the lymphatic system, which cleanses toxins from the body. In the 2009 edition of Principles of Addiction Medicine, Dr. James O. Prochaska wrote, “Physical activity helps manage moods, stress and distress. Also, 60 minutes per week of exercise can provide a recovering person with more than 50 health and mental health benefits. Exercise thus should be prescribed to all sedentary patients with addiction.”

Lewis said the program’s fitness component helped change her mentality.

“Now, I don’t want to numb the pain out,” Lewis said. “I want to feel pain. I want to feel the pain of running. Even when I know it hurts, I want to finish what I started.”

Shortly after Lewis graduated from the ARC program, she was hired by Feet on the Street.
“This is a dream job for me,” Lewis said. “After we run, it’s amazing how everything seems better. It’s just a different coping mechanism. Running helps you process everything.”

Misty Paulson, who successfully completed the six-month program, said Feet on the Street was just the outlet she needed. Since graduating, she has reunited with her two daughters.

“When I first entered the Adult Rehabilitation Center I wanted to leave rather than put up with the discipline and structure required of us in the program, but I realized I had nowhere else to go,” she said. “When I joined the Feet on the Street program I felt I was able to channel all the anger and hatred I had inside me to the difficult task of running long distance.”

Since the program’s inception, ARC beneficiaries have participated in the Cops and Robbers 5K Road Chase and the Sand Creek 5K, notching female second-place and male third-place individual finishes in the latter.

Samantha Peel, Denver ARC program manager, noted that while physical health is key, it’s just the catalyst for bigger change.

“They make a commitment and that commitment becomes a goal,” Peel said. “That goal then becomes structure and that structure becomes hope.”

by Ron McKinney
Captain Ron Mckinney is the community relations manager for The Salvation Army Denver ARC.
Connect with Ron
denver.satruck.org
facebook.com/thesalvationarmywest
email: ron.mckinney@usw.salvationarmy.org

red kettle

Salvation Army Florida seeking bell ringers

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— The Salvation Army is looking for bell ringers as the holiday season approaches.

The Army’s branches in Broward and Miami-Dade counties are looking for people to ring bells during the annual Red Kettle Campaign. The job lasts through Christmas Eve and pays $8.50 an hour.

The Salvation Army’s Sally Gress told the Miami Herald (http://hrld.us/10QVs44 ) the holiday campaign is one of the agency’s most important fundraisers. Bell ringers have been collecting donations since 1891.

In Broward County, the agency is having two job fairs to fill 50 positions. Gress says they are looking for people with good people skills. And being able to stand outside for up to 10 hours a shift also helps.

In Miami-Dade, the agency will hire about 15 bell ringers at each of its four centers.

 

Original Article: Here

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Coats for Kids seeks outerwear, financial help

coats for kidsIf you didn’t clean your closet in the spring, organizers of the Coats for Kids drive hope you will organize it soon.

Donations of new or gently used coats, hats, gloves and scarves are being accepted through Nov. 7 for the annual collection.

It’s not just young children being served by this collection. Coats are needed for infants through high school students, so sizes youth 0 to adult 3X are sought.

More local businesses are offering collection space for the coats this year.

Those who don’t have a coat to give but who want to donate money can submit a check to the G101.3 radio station, 2301 W. Main St.

Armstrong Cleaners & Formal Wear again is donating cleaning services.

Families can apply for a coat through the Salvation Army Citadel at 700 S. A St., Richmond, which is handling coat distribution.

Last year, 912 coats were collected, including 136 new coats. Other gifts included 81 pairs of gloves, 38 scarves and 79 hats.

In 2012, about 600 coats were donated.

Manpower is the title sponsor with G101.3 the host for the local collection.

 

Where to give

Coats and accessories may be dropped off at First Bank and West End Bank locations, plus:

  • Manpower, 500 E. Main St.
  • RMD/Patti, 36 S. Ninth St.
  • Richmond Power & Light, 44 S. Eighth St.
  • Best-One Tire & Service, 100 N. Seventh St.
  • Williams & Keckler LLC, 808 S. A St.
  • Armstrong Cleaners, 1019 N. A St. and 651 N.W. Fifth St.
  • Subway East (4340 National Road E.) and West (1726 National Road W.)
  • Georgia Direct Carpet, 5200 National Road E.
  • Buffalo Wings and Rings, 500 Commerce Road
  • Natco Credit Union, 4 Glen Miller Parkway and 582 S. Round Barn Road
  • G101.3, 2301 W. Main St.

 

To learn more, call (765) 966-2664.

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Community Events

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Changing the Coffee Culture

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Salvos Coffee works to decrease labor exploitation and increase sustainability.

By Faye Michelson – 

Imagine coffee cherries grown without fertilizers or pesticides in the rich volcanic soil of Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) pristine Eastern Highlands and picked, pulped, washed and sorted by hand in remote villages, then dried in the sun for three days.

The Salvation Army works with coffee farmers and their families in this remote part of the world to ensure they receive a fair price for their harvest.

coffee culture 2“Coffee growers would walk for days with 30 kilograms [66 pounds] of coffee beans in bags on their backs to get to a roadside to sell, only to get ripped off,” said Luke Soper, business development manager for the PNG Territory. And so the Salvos Coffee program—initiated and developed in 2007 in PNG as a Community Advancement Reform Enhancement—assists 700 growers and their 3,500 family members in growing, harvesting and preparing beans for sale.

Soper’s job is to ensure the program is financially sustainable so that other aspects of The Salvation Army’s work with the farmers—such as health, hygiene, literacy, financial and agricultural education—can expand.

“Coffee growers who once would have had no other option but to sell their coffee for an unfair price at the roadside are now empowered,” Soper said. For instance, the program started a “passbook system” that releases profits to the growers when they want it until they have proper proof of identity or birth to open their first bank account.

Joseph Manase of the Kesawaka area wanted to become a pastor, but left school in fourth grade. When Salvos Coffee field officers went to his village they talked to him about resuming his education and showed him how to save money for school fees. He now attends high school with the money earned by his wife, who continues to work with Salvos Coffee in their village and also sends their children to school.

When the Ivoti people sold their coffee at a higher price than they expected they used the profit to buy roofing iron, coffee pulping machines and gardening tools. The Salvos Coffee team took them to a warehouse to buy the goods and helped arrange transportation of the equipment.

The program works through a cluster system centered around local Salvation Army churches in each participating village.

Community endorsement is vital for this project to succeed. We work to establish a rapport with the village headman and growers, because without that we can’t make headway.

“That’s very important; The Salvation Army is respected and trusted, and people understand we are there to help bring opportunity and fairness,” Soper said. “Community endorsement is vital for this project to succeed. We work to establish a rapport with the village headman and growers, because without that we can’t make headway.”

Salvos Coffee faces many community challenges, including domestic and family violence, so in addition to economics, the program also addresses resolving conflict and managing anger.

Soper divides his time between Sydney and PNG, a country that spans “tropical island to mountainous highlands.”

“One of the tough things, though, is living between a world of excess in Australia and extreme need in PNG,” he said. “We face many challenges—the ruggedness and the remoteness, and the cost of transportation.” Yet he said he finds reward in helping people in need. “It’s also important for me to be able to share with people in Australia—and my four young children—how well off we are and what we are doing in PNG to make a real and sustainable difference,” he said.

The Church Partnership Program provided funding to sustain Salvos Coffee for many years, and now the program must be self-sustaining. As Soper said, “Your purchase of our coffee helps fund a dedicated team in PNG to provide much-needed support services for remote, marginalized coffee growers and their families.”

See more at salvos.org.au/coffee

This post was originally featured in The New Frontier Chronicle.

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The Salvation Army Annual Report 2014

 

 

The Salvation Army Annual Report

“He gathers the lambs in His arms and carries them close to His heart.”

This verse from the Book of Isaiah is the foundation for The Salvation Army’s 2013 Online Annual Report’s theme, “Open Arms”, now available here. Commissioner David Jeffery, The Salvation Army’s National Commander, had this verse come to mind saying, “It’s a sweet image, a beautiful reminder of the Lord’s gentleness in caring for the vulnerable”.

The Salvation Army strives to follow the Lord’s example of caring and opening our arms and our hearts to anyone in need. And we’re proud to report that, guided by God’s love and your compassion and support, The Salvation Army served 30 million Americans in 2013!

Throughout this last year and with the help of 3.5 million volunteers, The Salvation Army:
Served nearly 60 million meals to the hungry
Provided over 10 million nights of lodging to the homeless
Sent almost 200,000 low income and disadvantaged kids to summer camp
Counseled 180,000 men and women with drug and alcohol rehabilitation

Also featured in the annual report is an inspiring video of The Salvation Army’ s Angel Tree Program which helps provide nearly 1 million disadvantaged children across the United States.
As it truly takes an army, our services would not be possible without your help and support and we would like to take this opportunity to thank you for furthering our mission to Do The Most Good!
The Salvation Army is here for you. We welcome all with open doors, open hearts, and open arms.

Learn more through our annual report about The Salvation Army’s programs and services utilized by those in need in 2013.

Visit salvationarmyannualreport.org to read the 2013 Online Annual Report.

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Mountain of Taters

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TWIN FALLS | Jim Taylor left Castleford hauling more than 20,000 pounds of potatoes. It wasn’t an uncommon Monday morning for the Blick Brothers Farms employee, but his payload was not for profit.

“We like to support the Salvation Army,” said Benny Blick. “They’re a good outfit.”

Taylor dumped his mountain of Blick Brothers spuds in the parking lot of the Twin Falls Salvation Army. The head-high pile of reds and russets came from a 2-acre field the brothers plant each year to feed themselves and to share with the public.

“There was probably 18 to 20,000 pounds,” Blick said, of the load.

On the last day of the harvest, the company let the community pick potatoes out of a re-loader, Blick said. They trucked the rest to Twin Falls.

“It’s an annual deal,” said Nicki Kroese, Salvation Army business manager. “The Blicks are very, very good to us.”

Blick said he likes helping out the organization because of it’s low overhead.

“The end result gets to where it needs to instead of ending up in the pockets of administration,” he said.

On Monday, the end result ended up in wire baskets, milk crates, cardboard boxes and plastic shopping bags as dozens gleaned the dusty pile.

“Taters, taters everywhere, taters, taters in your underwear,” Joe Arias chanted, as he and his wife, Donna, filled a box.

“We drove by and seen them out here,” she said.

Joe said the couple likes to prepare potatoes many ways. “Fried, baked, you name it.”

But they also planned to share their starchy bounty with family.

“We’re gonna take some to the brother in-law,” Joe said. “He’s got a small herd.”

On the other side of the mound, Ileen Adams and her daughter Eleanor Rainey, of Filer, carried wire baskets, heavy with russets to the trunk of a car. They’re familiar with local farmers sharing crops, but preferred picking from the pile.

“This is nice,” Ileen said, “we usually go out in the field to pick potatoes.”

The pair picked mostly russets, as the reds are thin skinned and don’t store as well, they said.

Kroese said the load hit the lot at about 10:30 a.m. She promoted the donation on Facebook with a photograph, and the gleaners soon appeared. By noon, the pile noticeably eroded.

“They’ll be gone by the end of the week,” she said.

The organization saw 76 people walk through its lunch line Monday, so the donation is always needed and welcomed. Some of the spuds will be stored in the basement of the building, Kroese said, and used by Salvation Army cooks.

“Cooking in large quantities is intense,” said cook Chris Newbry. “It’s literally like feeding an army.”

Newbry has been cooking in restaurants for more than 15 years and began working with the organization in February. He and his cohorts will use the donated spuds in many dishes, including his own Tater Chowder.

Chris Newbry’s Tater Chowder

Ingredients

For the White Sauce:

5 tablespoons butter

6 tablespoons flour

3 cups milk

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

For the Stock:

3 cups diced potatoes

1 ½ cups diced carrots

1 medium onion, minced

1 ½ cup celery, chopped small

½ cup bacon, chopped

½ tablespoon garlic, minced

Preparation

Fry the bacon in a pan, then drain fat. Add the vegetables to the pan and brown. Cover with boiling water. Cook until tender. Add the white sauce. Salt and pepper to taste.

Serves 6 to 8.

 

Original Article can be seen here