The Newest Youth Education Town Opens in Arlington, TX


After three years of hard work, The Gene and Jerry Jones Family North Texas Youth Education Town (YET) opened Monday morning in Arlington, Texas.

Under the operation of The Salvation Army, the facility is intended to provide a safe haven for children to improve their skills to live life to the best of their abilities. YET centers offer programs to enhance a child’s physical, social, psychological and spiritual well-being.
Since Super Bowl XXXVII in 1993, the National Football League has donated $1 million to establish Youth Education Centers in every city a Super Bowl is hosted. Arlington held the big game in 2011 and is recognized with the gift of this new center. Funds were also contributed to this project by The Gene and Jerry Jones Family Arlington Youth Foundation and the Super Bowl XLV Host Committee.

The ceremony included Cowboys owner and general manager, Jerry Jones and his family, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, Arlington mayor Robert Cluck as well as The Salvation Army’s new National Commander, Commissioner David Jeffrey. Also included in the festivities was Pro Football Hall of Famer Emmitt Smith and career Cowboy Daryl Johnston.

Appropriately, there was even a ceremonial touchdown run.

For information about becoming a member, volunteer, or to donate, please visit:

Posted by Jackie on Friday, October 18, 2013 ·


SA’s very own Mabee Babies shine in the NFL

For those of you who have bravely jumped into the world of Fantasy Football this year and endured the ever so stressful draft, I have something fun to share with you; you may have drafted an NFL star who was once part of The Salvation Army’s team.
Recognize anyone below?

The Salvation Army’s North Mabee Boys & Girls Club

Left: Robert Meachem- A Tulsa native and current wide receiver for the New Orlean Saints. Center: Chris Harris Oklahoma native and starting cornerback for the Denver Broncos. Right: Felix Jones- Tulsa native and Running Back for the Pittsburgh Steelers

Each one of these remarkable athletes once played football at The Salvation Army’s North Mabee Boys & Girls Club in Tulsa, OK where they first learned the sport, while also engaging in fellowship, character development, and other educational and recreational opportunities.

The North Mabee club is one of six Salvation Army safe havens in the city where underprivileged children find a sense of belonging and usefulness at the guidance of mentors and coaches.
But moreover, the North Mabee Boys & Girls Club is renowned for its recreation programs, which have proven to produce stars. Statistics recorded by the NFL and by The Salvation Army have revealed that athletes who play football as a member of the North Mabee club are 6.5 times more likely to make it to the NFL than a player from a Division 1 college team..
By the list of names above, I’d say it’s a pretty successful program.

After school programs of The Salvation Army are in full throttle. To volunteer with underprivileged children your area, or to find a center near you, please visit


Miami Dolphins Spread Some Valentine’s Day Love At Salvation Army

miami dolphinsMembers of the Miami Dolphins and the Miami Dolphins Women’s Organization (MDWO) visited the Miami Salvation Army on Thursday to spend time with some of the shelter’s residents.

After members of the MDWO helped put together a warm Valentine’s Day lunch, Dolphins players – including cornerbacks Richard Marshall and Kelcie McCray, tackle Nate Garner, running back Jonas Gray and wide receiver Brian Tyms – made sure that everyone had something to eat, with an assist from TD, the Dolphins mascot.

The 38th Street branch of the Miami Salvation Army, which is celebrating its 100-year anniversary serving the Miami-Dade community, houses 216 residents regularly – these are individuals and families that need a boost to get back on their feet, and The Salvation Army is there to lend a helping hand.

On Thursday afternoon, there was what Salvation Army Director of Development Judith Mori called a “full house,” a group of about 100 people, on hand to enjoy a warm meal and some Valentine’s Day fun.

“It’s very special and it’s very important for them to know that society hasn’t forgotten about them, and especially that the Dolphins are here to support,” Mori said. “Having them helps us set the mood, and also it creates the sense of community we always look for in this situation.”

Members of the Miami Dolphins Women’s Organization spent some time in the kitchen, helping put together a special Valentine’s Day lunch. When everything was hot and ready, residents lined up one by one, grabbed a tray and met with the players.

As the cafeteria filled up, Marshall, Garner, Gray and Tyms began to pass out some Valentine’s Day treats, spending one-on-one time with almost everyone.

Garner enjoyed the opportunity to put a smile on the faces of those he interacted with.

“It’s nice to spread love in the community here,” Garner said. “Just come out and try to make people safe on Valentine’s Day, make them have a good day – give them some candy and hopefully a little bit more joy in their life.”

The impact of what the Salvation Army residents receive extends beyond simply a steady meal or a place to stay; this is a safe haven where they are expected to dedicate themselves to whatever may be ailing them. Each man, woman or family is assigned a coach that makes sure they remain motivated to accomplish some sort of goal, whether that’s finishing up their education, securing a steady job or something of that nature.

For one day, the Dolphins were able to be part of this process. With their help, a normal Thursday afternoon turned into a festive one.

If it were an ordinary day, the residents may have been more reserved, less likely, perhaps, to interact with each other while they ate. But Thursday was different – laughter filled the cafeteria, bouncing from wall to wall, cameras flashed, nearly everyone had a smile on his face.

There was a tangible synergy that Mori said is key to raising spirits at the shelter.

“It creates a sense of community because they get together, they share things, they share a picture, they share a smile and they laugh together and therefore they create real friendships,” Mori said. “This is very important because this is a safe environment, so it’s good for them to be friends with people who are also going through the same situations and need to be motivated together.”

By Sean Logan