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Walmart & Salvation Army To “Fill the Truck” with Toys for Children in Need

Fill the Truck

Starting this Saturday, November 29, select Walmart stores across the country will kick off the second annual Fill the Truck Toy Drive, which will collect hundreds of thousands of toys for children in need in partnership with The Salvation Army.
Shoppers visiting one of the 3,500 participating stores on November 29, December 7, and December 15 will have the opportunity to drop of new, unwrapped toys at the trucks or bins to be distributed to assist parents in providing joy to their children on Christmas morning.

“Walmart has been such a big supporter of The Salvation Army and we are so appreciative of all the hard work they put into Fill the Truck,” said Major Ron Busroe, National Community Relations and Development Secretary for The Salvation Army USA. “This year, Fill the Truck is reaching even more customers and our hope is to provide more children with a Christmas toy that they would not receive otherwise.”

In one day at last year’s inaugural event, generous shoppers donated an amazing 135,000 toys and 10,000 coats for American children in need.

For more than 40 years, Walmart has been an essential partner of The Salvation Army. In addition to these events, the Walmart Foundation – whose mission is to create opportunities so people can live better around the globe – is once again helping us combat hunger through a $1 million donation to support The Salvation Army’s feeding programs, which provide nearly 60 million meals each year to individuals in need.

This Thanksgiving and beyond, The Salvation Army give thanks for Walmart, our valued partner in Doing the Most Good.
See you Saturday!

Read the official press release at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org

Help Keep a Child Warm this Winter, by Donating a Coat

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Fall is now in full effect and with winter slowly creeping around the corner, many are starting to prepare to bundle up.

This year, as you transition to warmer clothing, consider decluttering   those bulky winter coats your children no longer wear, and help The Salvation Army keep underprivileged children warm as the temps continue to decline.  Just imagine that feeling of opening your coat closet and actually placing your swiffer in with ease rather than dealing with the daily battle for room with those space eating coats.  And the cherry on top-it’s for a great cause!

The Salvation Army’s annual Coats for Kids program is in full swing and locations nationwide are calling for donations of winter coats and jackets for families that cannot afford proper winter attire.
Just by clearing out your closet, you can make a huge difference in a child’s life.

All new or gently used coats can be taken to one of the many Salvation Army ‘Coats for Kids’ collection drives in various communities across the country. To find a participating Salvation Army near you, enter your zip code here.
If there is not a drive happening in your area, you can always donate gently used or new coats to your local Salvation Army Family Store. Just visit www.satruck.org and find the closet location near you or check out the easy-to-use Salvation Army Family Store App, available on the App Store and Google play, where you can schedule a pickup, find locations and get rewards.
As always, The Salvation Army is grateful for your donations and support!

Posted by Jackie on Tuesday, October 8, 2013 · Leave a Comment

Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Collects 10,000 Back-to-School Items for Students in Need

School is in full gear, and so are thousands of kids thanks to Krispy Kreme’s “Stuff the Bus” campaign which provided backpacks and school supplies to hundreds of children from low-income families across the country.

Throughout the months of August and September, participating locations collected supplies donations from their communities in exchange for a free Original Glazed Doughnut; an alluring incentive, if you’ve ever tried one. The supplies were distributed via The Salvation Army.

Annual school shopping can be an expensive feat, so we’re thankful for the supporters who stepped up to donate approximately 10,000 items for American families in need.

A huge thanks to Krispy Kreme Doughnuts for their generous support of The Salvation Army’s back-to-school programs.

Krispy Kreme employees in Louisville, KY


Sorting through donations at The Salvation Army in Akron, OH


Krispy Kreme employees in Knoxville, KY

Posted by Megan on Thursday, September 26, 2013 ·

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SA’s very own Mabee Babies shine in the NFL

For those of you who have bravely jumped into the world of Fantasy Football this year and endured the ever so stressful draft, I have something fun to share with you; you may have drafted an NFL star who was once part of The Salvation Army’s team.
Recognize anyone below?

The Salvation Army’s North Mabee Boys & Girls Club

Left: Robert Meachem- A Tulsa native and current wide receiver for the New Orlean Saints. Center: Chris Harris Oklahoma native and starting cornerback for the Denver Broncos. Right: Felix Jones- Tulsa native and Running Back for the Pittsburgh Steelers

Each one of these remarkable athletes once played football at The Salvation Army’s North Mabee Boys & Girls Club in Tulsa, OK where they first learned the sport, while also engaging in fellowship, character development, and other educational and recreational opportunities.

The North Mabee club is one of six Salvation Army safe havens in the city where underprivileged children find a sense of belonging and usefulness at the guidance of mentors and coaches.
But moreover, the North Mabee Boys & Girls Club is renowned for its recreation programs, which have proven to produce stars. Statistics recorded by the NFL and by The Salvation Army have revealed that athletes who play football as a member of the North Mabee club are 6.5 times more likely to make it to the NFL than a player from a Division 1 college team..
By the list of names above, I’d say it’s a pretty successful program.

After school programs of The Salvation Army are in full throttle. To volunteer with underprivileged children your area, or to find a center near you, please visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org.

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The Salvation Army in Central Kentucky: LemonAiD


Salvation Army Central Kentucky’s LemonAiD program empowers young people to make a positive difference in their community by operating a lemonade stand during the month of July and donating the proceeds to help homeless children residing in The Salvation Army’s Emergency Homeless Shelter.

The Central Kentucky Salvation Army has a 152 bed shelter for the homeless trying to make ends meet, a day care for little ones that is Head Start approved, a clinic run by a physician and University of Kentucky student volunteers, and a Boys & Girls Club that serves 600 children each year, replete with a basketball court, a computer room, and a couple of very popular fooz tables.
But the Central Kentucky Salvation Army is about more than programs. It’s about people.
Last Friday morning, 30 board members showed up for a retreat to brainstorm on attracting younger supporters to the work and ministry of The Salvation Army.
30 board members. On a weekday. Early. Pre-donuts.

Marcia Larson, Salvation Army National Advisory Board member presenting to board members of The Salvation Army – Lexington, KY.

This committed board is galvanizing Lexington & Georgetown volunteers like the 1,593 who raised $48,000 this year running Lemon Aid stands to support homeless children in Lexington.  Or the volunteers getting ready to run in the Scott County 5K walk later this month.

Salvation Army officers like Majors Debra & Steve Ashcraft who give of their time, talent, and treasure as they pour their lives into their community. As they took my mom and me around the Salvation Army campus last week, Debra told us about a young boy in their music camp. A camp where 250 children learn to play music each year.

This little guy was shy. Afraid. Lacked self-confidence.

Over time, as Salvation Army officers mentored this little guy on the trumpet, he started coming out of his shell. He felt less afraid. He found a talent to share with the world. He gained confidence.
And then, one day, he got up in front of an audience at the Corps and played that trumpet for everyone. He started looking up.
The work of The Salvation Army is about our Lord lifting up heads. It’s about building skills and developing God-given talents in people so that they see themselves as God sees them. Worthy. Redeemed. Valuable – whether they’re homeless, unemployed, hungry or spiritually impoverished.

But you, O LORD, are a shield about me, my glory, and the lifter of my head. – Psalm 3:3
For more on Central Kentucky’s work lifting heads, click here.
***Marcia Larson is a Board Member of The Salvation Army & The Micah Global Foundation. She received her B.A. from Vanderbilt and M.A. in French / Art History (NYU) and Public Policy (Texas A&M). She enjoys being a Twitter coach at Dow Jones / The Wall Street Journal. She currently resides in New York City. Her favorite verse is Micah 6:8.

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You Can Help The Salvation Army battle Food Insecurity

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Social media was abuzz yesterday with posts about the first day of school; excited parents posting pictures of their kids standing ready for the bus, and students expressing excitement or dread about the start of a new academic year. But one topic you likely won’t hear your friends talking about on social media is food insecurity, a rising concern for families struggling in the Great Recession, as well as schools.

In 2011, according to Feeding America, 50.1 million Americans lived in food insecure households, 33.5 million adults and 16.7 million children.

And the numbers are rising. Between 2007 – 2011, the percentage of U.S. households with food-insecure children increased from 8.3 to 10 percent, according to a report from USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS).

Feeding America also tells us that children from food insecure households– where parents struggle to meet basic food needs –  are at a disadvantage in their academic development compared to other students, which ultimately makes it difficult for them to achieve the same level of development as their fellow food secure peers.

But here’s the good news: The Salvation Army is dedicated to helping families meet this basic need, and supporting healthy children in the classroom. One way we do this is through your donations to our food pantries, which provide groceries for individuals and families in need and are essential to battling food insecurity.

I’ve noted several news stories as of late about Salvation Army branches seeking food donations from their communities. At many locations, the pantry supply is running critically low, likely due to the time of year; people are enjoying the end of summer and gearing up for the busy months ahead rather than donating.

The Salvation Army Food Pantry in Panama City is just one example where food is in short supply. This location feeds up to 15 families daily through donations. If you live in Panama City, click here to learn how you can donate today. Your support is needed to ensure that our shelves are stocked so we can meet those needs.

To donate nonperishable foods to your local Salvation Army food pantry, check out our main website for a list of locations near you:  www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Or, click here for other ways to show your support. In 2011 alone, we served almost 60 million meals to individuals and families in need.

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Using Humor to Heal Broken Hearts in OK

Post courtesy of Krachel Greenwood, E-Communications Manager at The Salvation Army – Wisconsin Upper Michigan Division.

David McCullough makes a living by making others smile. The professional clown, known as Korn Pop, was only 12 years old when he realized his calling in life. “I was the class clown and was always getting into some kind of mischief in school,” he says. “I wrote a report on the circus. My teacher knew a retired circus clown and introduced him to me. His name was Popcorn, and I wanted to be just like him when I grew up.”

When the EF5 tornado touched down in Moore, Oklahoma, McCullough’s pastor at the Rock Hill Baptist Church in Brownsboro, Texas, put a call out for volunteers to assist with clean-up efforts. McCullough agreed to go, so long as his pastor would allow him to share a few balloon animals along the way.

“I love Jesus, and I know Jesus has a heart for people. It’s my ministry. It’s how I can show Jesus’ love, by bringing smiles to others,” he says.

McCullough spent the morning clowning around at The Salvation Army’s Distribution Center located in Plaza Mayor at the Crossroads. While he was there he spoke to several children who lost everything during the recent tornadoes across Oklahoma City.

Fifteen-year-old Aaron, who lives next door to Briarwood Elementary School, says he likes to lift weights. That inspired McCullough to tie up a balloon-figure weightlifter, something that the high school sophomore could give a thumbs up to.

Nine-year-old Sterling flew in with family from Georgia to assist a brother who lost his home. She says there isn’t much left of his house, located on 6th Street in Moore.

Five-year-old Jayden couldn’t believe her eyes when Korn Pop asked her to hold a balloon and it popped out of her hands.

“I love The Salvation Army. I love what you guys do,” McCullough says. ”When winter rolls around I ring bells. I do what I can to help.”

For the boy who wrote a school paper about the circus, serving others by clowning around has proved to be the perfect way to share the love Jesus has for others.