Princess Ball Shows What Real Beauty is to Survivors of Domestic Violence

princess ball
“Kissed by the King” was the theme of the inaugural Princess Ball held at The Salvation Army Block of Hope. Click the image to see more photos.

Originally posted by Samantha Hyde of The Salvation Army Indiana Division. Visit to read more. 

We don’t usually associate homelessness, domestic violence and life in a shelter with ball gowns, sparkling jewelry or joyous dancing. For the women at The Salvation Army’s Ruth Lilly Women & Children’s Center in Indianapolis, this all changed with the inaugural Princess Ball, held next door to the shelter at Center City Corps.

Princess-Ball-2-198x300The two buildings are part of the Block of Hope, The Salvation Army’s property in downtown Indianapolis that attends to the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of women, children and families from across Indiana. Many who come here have traveled difficult, demoralizing roads. Hope often seems out of reach and love a thing of fairy tales.

That’s where the idea of the Princess Ball grew. It was conceived as a way to show the women living at the Block of Hope that real beauty and worth live in our hearts and souls. As Envoy Becky Roberson explained to the ladies, “We are all princesses because we have all been kissed by the King.”

The event was made possible with the generous support of local businesses like More Than A Boutique, which donated gowns and shoes for the women, and Kiss Kiss Bang Bang salon, which sent over a team of stylists to transform the women into “princesses” before the ball began. The Salvation Army ARC also stepped up with evening gowns and accessories and local baker George Taylor provided sweet treats from his A & M Bakery Cafe.


While many of the women seemed hesitant and unsure as they faced an unfamiliar activity, it wasn’t long before they were all dancing the night away in their new finery, uninhibited and joyous. Mothers swirled their daughters to the sweet sounds of “My Girl” and a riotous Conga line swirled around the pink-festooned sanctuary-turned-ballroom when “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” played over the speakers. Laughter, confidence and sisterhood replaced trepidation and feelings of worthlessness. Together, these women found strength and kinship.
Of course, it takes more than an evening playing Cinderella to mend broken lives.

The struggles that lie ahead for these women and their families are real, but they have a little extra firepower in their hearts and a more confident outlook as they take on the next challenge. After all, who wouldn’t glow a little brighter when she has been “Kissed by the King?”

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Austin Mahone to Headline Fourth Annual Rock the Red Kettle Concert Benefiting The Salvation Army!

Ready for it….
Austin Mahone
We are thrilled to announce that The Salvation Army will host the fourth annual Rock the Red Kettle Concert at Universal City Walk’s “5 Towers” concert venue in Los Angeles on December 7, with performances by musical artists Austin Mahone, Kelly Rowland, Bean, and Coco Jones!

Hosted and produced by Ned Specktor of Specktor Media, the free show helps raise awareness of The Salvation Army’s 123rd annual Red Kettle Campaign, the oldest charitable fundraiser of its kind in the United States. Money raised during the campaign helps the Army serve 30 million of America’s most vulnerable through an array of programs including food for the hungry, shelter for the homeless and toys for children.

This year, the free concert will be streamed live on The Salvation Army’s Tumblr page at, so you don’t have to miss out if you’re not in the area!

Similar to years past, fans can host their own Online Red Kettles by visiting But this year, the Army is saying thanks in a big way by launching the Rock the Online Red Kettle Team sweepstakes and enlisting the help of the artists to raise funds for a chance to hang out with them in person or via a Google Hangout.

By joining the Online Red Kettle Teams of Mahone, Jones or Bean, three lucky fans will win the chance to fly to Los Angeles with a guest to attend the concert and meet the performers. Eight more participants will win the opportunity to virtually connect with the artists through a Google Hangout before the show.

You can support the Red Kettle Campaign through the artist of your choosing by clicking on the names below: Austin Mahone: Coco Jones: Bean:

In addition to giving online or to the more than 25,000 bell ringers found on street corners and retail entrances across the country, supporters can donate through the Army’s text-to-give program. By texting the word “KETTLE” to 80888, donors can send $10 to the Red Kettle Campaign through December 24.

Posted by Megan on Thursday, November 14, 2013 ·


Study reveals Millennials are Charitable, Influential, & Eager to Connect Over a Cause


Millennials – all 80 million of us – get a bad rap.

If you’re currently between the ages of 18-34, you’re a part of ‘Generation ME’ and collectively called lazy, narcissistic, and impatient. But other characteristics contradict these accusations to some degree: we’re also said to be open-minded, more supportive of equal rights, confident, upbeat, self-expressive, receptive to new ideas, and best of all – giving.

A study called The Millennial Impact reveals the “Me Generation” is actually extremely philanthropic. And this doesn’t include the “slacktivism” that exists on Facebook. But let’s be honest – it felt darn good to Like that dog photo and donate someone else’s money to rescue efforts.

Rather, we look outward rather than inward, relying on the influence of our peers when it comes to taking action. And once we’re inspired, the study reveals that we’ll go to great lengths to get family, friends and loved ones involved in our causes.
Lazy? Selfish? Hardly!

In fact, millennials are compassionate and eager to commit their time, money and skills toward causes and organizations. The study revealed that 75% of millennials donated to charitable causes last year, while 63% gave time to volunteer. While millennials are more likely to donate in smaller amounts across several organizations, they are also apt to fundraise on behalf of nonprofits by soliciting support from friends and family. And when organizations offer volunteer opportunities with limited barriers to entry (remember, we’re impatient), millennials are most likely to give back through events or by freely offering their knowledge and expertise to their charity of choice.

Take The Salvation Army Twin Cities MOST Amazing Race for example, a fundraiser based off of the popular CBS show “Amazing Race,” where teams of two people run around the city making pit stops to complete various challenges. The goal of the race is to raise awareness and funds for The Salvation Army, and commitment and fundraising are prerequisites for competing.

In the end, 30 teams raised $72,921 for food and shelter programs of The Salvation Army through activities such as planking, Bollywood dancing, and plunging off a 25-foot-high platform. And you can be darn sure these events were well documented on participants’ Facebook and Instagram pages.

You often hear that good deeds are rooted in selfishness, and there may be a bit of truth to that, but that’s because giving back feels really, really good. And if you can brag about your good work on Instagram, filter and all, and maybe even inspire your friends to do the same, then what’s the problem?


Salvation Army San Francisco Awarded $10,000 Grant from Charles Schwab Corporation

Last week, we asked Facebook users to vote for The Salvation Army of San Francisco in the Charles Schwab Community Services Contest, which welcomed four non-profits to submit videos in competition for a generous $10,000 grant from the Charles Schwab Corporation (CS&Co). Each video submission described the mission and service of the participating non-profit.

We are thrilled to announce that The Salvation Army won the grand prize of $10,000, all thanks to your votes! A huge congrats to The Salvation Army in San Francisco. Check out the winning video below:

“We’re so excited that CS&Co gave us the opportunity to share our mission with thousands of viewers who may not have known about The Army and the myriad of ways we help people in need every day,” Laine Hendricks, Public Relations Director for The Salvation Army Golden State Division said. “Telling the story of changed lives is just as valuable as the top prize itself.”

In addition, The Salvation Army of San Francisco welcomed Charles Schwab Corporation volunteers at three different locations during the 10th annual Schwab Volunteer Week which included service projects in 82 cities across the U.S., with the help of 3,200 employees.

As part of their week of service, volunteers assembled almost 3,000 sandwiches for The Salvation Army’s Harbor Light Center Homeless Outreach, a program which coordinates the delivery of food, socks, hygiene kits and other donated goods to people living on the streets of San Francisco.

“We are so humbled to be included among other worthy non-profits doing great work across America and we hope all the videos inspired viewers to give back to their local community through volunteering or donating,” Hendricks said.

We give thanks to partners like CS&Co who help enable The Salvation Army’s service to communities in need. For more information on The Salvation Army’s services, visit