tornadoes 2017

Severe storms across the Carolinas

‘Severe storms impacted the Carolinas last night with possible tornado touchdowns in isolated areas across both states. There were no fatalities and reports of injuries are non-life threatening. Severe thunderstorms with damaging winds and tornadoes are possible this morning from eastern North Carolina into southeastern Virginia.

The Salvation Army of Rockingham County (Majors Burnita and Paul Fuller) is responding to storm damaged areas in Eden, NC. There was no damage to Salvation Army properties or facilities. A canteen and crew from Winston- Salem, NC will be deploying this morning to provide hydration and meals in the area today. In addition, the regularly scheduled noon meal at the Eden Service Center will take place and those without power are invited as well. The food pantry and family store are also being made available to provide assistance as required and/or requested.

While additional mutual aid is not required or requested at this time, please pray for all personnel providing service.’

tornadoes 2017

FLA Division Puts Units On Standby For Flash Flooding

Large amounts of rain across north Florida are generating flash flooding in and around Alachua, Marion, Suwanee, Gilchrist, Lafayette and Columbia counties.

While the extent of damage is unknown, FLA Division is putting canteens on stand-by for deployment as needed.

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Salvation Army Georgia Division Deploys Disaster Teams

Note the following report from Lanita Lloyd in Georgia Division …

  • The Covington GA service center canteen has been deployed to Mansfield, Georgia (Newton County). The crew consists of 3 trained disaster volunteers. There has been some damage due to a reported tornado touchdown. The unit is responding at the request of local emergency management and will be feeding first responders and utility crews.
  • Additionally, the Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA) requested a canteen in Ellaville, GA, (Schley County) due to power outages. Food and water has been requested for residents and incoming emergency workers. The Americus, GA, canteen is responding to provide food and hydration this evening.
Canteen Disaster Relief

I-85 Bridge Collapse in Atlanta

Emergency Disaster Services Bulletin – Red Shield Canteen Deploying to I-85 Bridge Collapse in Atlanta

san antonio

San Antonio Storm Prompts Salvation Army Response

san antonioSan Antonio, TX – In the late evening of Sunday, February 19, a severe storm system moved through San Antonio, Texas, causing significant damage to homes and businesses in the north of the city.

Salvation Army staff spent Monday morning assessing the damage in the worst hit areas where three tornado touch downs were reported.

Two Salvation Army mobile feeding units with crews from San Antonio and New Braunfels were deployed and provided roving food and hydration services for survivors and first responders. One unit provided meal service to residents based at the Howard Elementary School in the Alamo Heights area. Clean up kits and water were sent from The Salvation Army EDS warehouse in Arlington and arrived in San Antonio late in the afternoon.

“By mid-morning our crews were in the affected areas and working to assist people with food, snacks, drinks and encouragement. Fallen branches and debris was a major issue in several communities and our staff rolled up their sleeves and worked alongside residents in the clean up effort,” said Alvin Migues, The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services Director for Texas. “Water and clean up kits will be made available to residents tomorrow and we are working closely with partner agencies to make sure that we are providing meaningful and effective support.”

The Salvation Army will continue to assess the needs of the communities affected and provide services as needed in the coming days.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar spent is used to carry out those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.

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Father, son team delivers food and hope in Baton Rouge flood

 

(Baton Rouge, LA) The Ketchums make a great team when it comes to disaster response. The father, son duo are one of the most experienced crews working in Baton Rouge this week following historic flooding throughout many parts of Southern Louisiana.

“I know how he wants things…I can anticipate what he wants,” said Ike Ketchum.

Dan drives and Ike navigates. They have worked as a team since Hurricane Gustav.

The pair moved to New Orleans shortly after Hurricane Katrina hit looking for work in construction. What they found was a way to help those in desperate need.

“We’ve had people try to pay us for the meals we give them off the canteen,” said Dan Ketchum. “I tell them I will only accept a handshake. You can see their surprise first, then the gratitude.”

Despite how “fluid” things seem to go on their canteen, their relationship hasn’t always been so smooth. Not too long ago, Dan was asked to read the bible scripture during church services at the New Orleans Salvation Army. He read from Luke 15…the story of the prodigal son.

“It took me a long time to read that cause my son was lost. I got choked up,” said Ketchum.

Ike saw what that scripture did to his father. Dan says he can’t explain what happened after that but Ike did a one eighty.

At one time, caught up in drugs and alcohol, Ike says The Salvation Army changed his life.

“The Salvation Army gave me the opportunity to change my life,” said Ike Ketchum. “I feel like I’m the luckiest person ever.”

Now, the Ketchums run their “ministry” out of a canteen each time they are called upon. 

“I see how people are grateful, and the community is changed. It blows my mind every time we go out,” said Ike.

“The Salvation Army is a family, they welcomed me with open arms, and that’s what I do from the canteen,” says Dan.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar spent is used to carry out those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.

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Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its services

Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its servicesFernando Mena sat at a cafeteria table consuming a hot dog, chili and potato chips.

The 25-yr-old who stated he lives in the woods began going to The Salvation Army 3 times a day for meals after recently quitting his job cleaning at a fast-food restaurant. Mena cited well being issues as the rationale behind quitting his job and stated he’s in search of temp jobs.

At one other table, Artherine Booth, seventy five, sat with a few buddies. Ms. Booth moved in to The Salvation Army ladies’s shelter in June after having to leave her previous residence.

She is planning to move into the Catherine Booth Gardens of Tyler, one of two residential facilities that The Salvation Army operates for low-income and senior citizens via a federal government contract.

Though Disa Brown has a house she shares together with her fiancé and eighty three-yr-old father, she eats lunch at The Salvation Army two to 5 times every week, one thing she’s done off and on for the past 4 years.

“It simply is significant, because Tyler isn’t a large metropolis, and it doesn’t have a whole lot of assistance for us, so for this to be right here to feed us three meals a day, it means so much to lots of people who don’t have,” stated Ms. Brown, 36, who described herself as a homemaker and self-employed. “You by no means know when your life can turn around and you don’t have anything.”

These individuals are amongst a rising number of East Texas residents who’re going to The Salvation Army for meals.

This summer, the nonprofit has seen a 40% increase, from 5,000 to 7,000, in weekly meals served.

In addition, about 10% of the 127 shelter residents are within the facility due to climate.

The nonprofit has a 200-bed facility and further housing area for 250 cots for emergency situations. Water and cooling stations for short-term use can also be found.

Director of Development Cindy Bell mentioned, because the Salvation Army doesn’t survey their shoppers, they can’t formally attribute the rise to one thing in particular.

However anecdotally, they stated the summer season does create greater pressure on folks, as a result of rising utility cost, and people must make harder decisions about the way to spend their cash.

“I have to decide, ‘do I buy meals for my household or the medication that I need?” Ms. Bell mentioned.

Lindsey Galabeas, The Salvation Army’s community and public relations coordinator, mentioned when individuals already live paycheck to paycheck, any increase in expenses, makes it tougher.

For the organization, the challenge comes as a result of, despite the fact that the individuals utilizing its services are growing, donations are declining as they usually do throughout the summer season.

“Lots of people consider us as a Christmas group,” Ms. Galabeas stated. The fact is the group is largely active throughout  the year.

The nonprofit’s services include men’s, women’s and family shelters, free daily meals, a residential drug rehabilitation program, rent and utility assistance, emergency disaster services and afterschool programs.

The agency is seeking donations to help fund its programs, which is about $four million for the shelters, social services and administration buildings.

Ms. Bell stated the company has a lean budget, and 87 cents of each $1 donated goes to services.

Twitter: @TMTEmily

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HOW TO GIVE

The Salvation Army of Tyler is in need of monetary donations to help fund the growing number of clients utilizing its services. For more details about The Salvation Army or to donate, go to www.salvationarmytexas.org/tyler , stop by the office at 633 N. Broadway Ave. in Tyler, or call 903-592-4361.

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DINING AT THE SALVATION ARMY

The Salvation Army serves three meals a day Sunday through Friday and two meals a day on Saturday. These free meals are open to the general public. Serving times are as follows:

Monday-Friday

Breakfast: 7 to 7:45 a.m.

Lunch: 12 to 12:45 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5 p.m.

Saturday

Brunch: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Sunday

Breakfast: 8 to 8:30 a.m.

Lunch: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

center for hope

More NC children living in poverty than in 2008

 

center for hopeThe number of children in North Carolina living in poverty has increased by 25 percent since 2008, according to a report to be released Tuesday, even as the nation recovered from the recession.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation report, which studies factors related to children’s well-being, noted several worsening financial conditions in the state since the recession, but also saw improvements in healthcare and education. The foundation is a private philanthropy that makes grants to nonprofits to respond to issues that negatively affect children.

About 566,000 children, or one in four in the state, live in poverty, according to the report. Two other measures of financial stability – children whose parents lack secure employment and teens who are not in school and not working – also worsened since 2008.

North Carolina ranked 35th overall in the report for child well-being. The state tied with Texas and Kentucky for the 11th highest child poverty rate in the country. The federal poverty level for a family of four is $24,250.

Laila Bell, the director of research and data for the non-profit NC Child, said that the recession was a trigger for some of the changes, but state legislation contributed to the problems.

As an example, she cited the state allowing the earned income tax credit to expire in 2014. Republican lawmakers at the time said eliminating the tax credit, along with other changes, was meant to simplify the system and to spread the tax burden equally.

Bell said the challenges are even larger than the report indicates because it takes the income of twice the federal poverty level to adequately provide for children.

Measuring by that standard, about half the children in North Carolina live in poverty, or more than a million children, Bell said. Children of color are twice as likely to live in poverty, she said.

Nola Davis, 37, is staying in the Salvation Army’s Center of Hope shelter near uptown with her three children, ages 2, 3 and almost 11. She said her family moved there in October after losing its home and living in a hotel for about a year.

Davis recently found a job with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools and her children’s father works at the airport.

She said she has continually been rejected by landlords for housing despite being able to pay the rent.

“Once they find out you’re here, it’s such a stigma coming from a homeless shelter that nobody wants to rent to you,” she said. Davis and her family recently found a landlord willing to rent to them, and they hope to move in next month.

‘A heavy burden’

Poverty impacts many areas in a child’s life, Bell said. Children in poor households have less access to fresh foods, high-quality schools and green space. Over time, these children may be less prepared for school, impacting their education.

“Coming to school with that on your shoulders is a heavy burden,” said Susan Hansell, executive director of A Child’s Place.

Children living in poverty also spend less time in school because they normally have to use school buses to get home, she said. “They’re not able to take advantage of after-school programs,” she said.

Homeless children can also experience a higher degree of anxiety and depression, Hansell said.

Though poverty affects children at any age, those in early stages of development are particularly susceptible, Bell said.

Davis said her oldest daughter can’t understand all of the circumstances that led to living at the shelter.

“How do you explain that to a child?” she said.

Bell said North Carolina lawmakers could improve conditions for kids in the state by supporting the health of mothers before and during their pregnancies. Better healthcare, possibly through expanded access to insurance for low-income women, can help prevent low birth weight babies.

The state government could also invest more in early childhood education, a key to children’s development and future success in school, Bell said.

Charlotte has a network of support groups and non-profits that can help children and families in poverty, Hansell said. A Child’s Place advocates for homeless children and their families, helping them find healthcare and educational support.

Not all the factors in the Kids Count report worsened. All health measures improved, and three out of four education measures improved. About 94 percent of the state’s children are insured, more than at any point in the state’s history, Bell said.

In education, the report found more fourth-graders are proficient in reading, more eighth-graders are proficient in math and more high school students are graduating on time.

 

fans for the elderly

Fans for the elderly

fans for the elderly

Fans for the Elderly

The Salvation Army and an area media firm are teaming up to assist in making sure that the elderly keep cool throughout the summer’s brutal heat.
Thomas Media and the charity are gathering fans to distribute to elderly and others in poor health.

Salvation Army officers say they’ve given away 15 thus far.

Anyone can donate to the Salvation Army or at any Thomas Media location.

Churches are also gathering money to donate to the Salvation Army.

This is the first year for the program, which started July 1 and will proceed until the end of August.

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Salvation Army captains bid farewell, extend thanks to community

After more than three years overseeing the Bartow County service area, Salvation Army Capts. Lee and Michelle Wilson will bid farewell June 21.

“We received our orders to move to the divisional headquarters of the Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi division of The Salvation Army,” Michelle Wilson said. “Our office will be located in Jackson, Miss. Our roles in Jackson will be in finance for myself and program for Lee.

“We are so grateful for the many blessings we have received from serving here in Bartow County. We could not have met the many challenges and opportunities that came our way without the support of the community. We truly say from the bottom of our hearts, ‘Thank you for your support.’”

She continued, “I have been amazed since our first few days here about how giving this community is, especially when it comes to nonprofits. Our kettle effort is a testimony of this, as we run a 55 percent volunteer driven effort. This far exceeds the standard of many other Salvation Army commands both small and large.”

Extending thanks to the community, the Wilsons said they were continuously impressed by the public’s willingness to help their neighbors in need.

“I think my most memorable moment is how God has provided over and over again through the generosity of others,” Michelle Wilson said. “In nonprofit work, you can be tempted to walk by sight and be discouraged by the great needs around you, but we know that as Christians we walk by faith in expectancy of what will be done for us.

“We have been, at many times throughout our 3 1/2 years, unsure of how we would meet the needs of our neighbors in need but just at the right time, the heart of a caring volunteer or generous donor would be led to support us in exactly the way that was needed.”

Operating in Cartersville since 1995, The Salvation Army — an evangelical part of the universal Christian church — aided more than 11,000 people last year with various services, such as food, financial assistance and youth character building programs. While the thrift store closed April 30, the nonprofit will hold monthly sales in the future to support The Salvation Army’s programs and services.

“In 2014, The Salvation Army served 11,324 people right here in Bartow County. That, based on 2013’s population is 11.18 percent of Bartow County that is being served by The Salvation Army,” Michelle Wilson said. “Each and every day we provide basic needs, such as food, toiletries, prescription assistance, utility assistance and disaster services.

“We also serve underprivileged children each week through our youth character building programs, which provide life skills to youth K [through] 12. Lastly, we offer our seasonal services that provide toys and clothing through the Angel Tree program to children in need, opportunities for children to attend weeklong summer camps as well as community care outreach to shut-ins throughout the county.”

In addition to The Salvation Army’s donors and recipients, Bartow’s church community also has made a lasting impression on Lee Wilson.
“Bartow County is a county that prays,” he said. “Last year my wife and I were present at the National Day of Prayer service that was held outside of the courthouse. While there, we learned of the Bible being read cover to cover in various places in the county, and we thought that was amazing. So amazing, that this year, we took our youth group to one of the locations to participate in this reading. Seeing our young people taking part in this event was something I will never forget.”

On June 28, the Wilsons’ successors — Capts. Scott and Michelle Lyles — will start serving the Salvation Army’s Cartersville Corps.

“This transition of leadership in The Salvation Army is something that happens every so often,” Lee Wilson said. “Capts. Scott and Michelle Lyles are two very capable officers, and I know that they are not only praying for their new community, but looking forward to joining the Bartow County family. It is my hope and prayer that you will embrace them as you did us, and continue to support the work of The Salvation Army as they continue to do the work that our Lord and Savior has called us all to do.”

For more information about supporting the Salvation Army, located at 16 Felton Place, call 770-386-6256 or send the nonprofit a message via its Facebook page, The Salvation Army – Cartersville, Ga.