Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its services

Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its servicesFernando Mena sat at a cafeteria table consuming a hot dog, chili and potato chips.

The 25-yr-old who stated he lives in the woods began going to The Salvation Army 3 times a day for meals after recently quitting his job cleaning at a fast-food restaurant. Mena cited well being issues as the rationale behind quitting his job and stated he’s in search of temp jobs.

At one other table, Artherine Booth, seventy five, sat with a few buddies. Ms. Booth moved in to The Salvation Army ladies’s shelter in June after having to leave her previous residence.

She is planning to move into the Catherine Booth Gardens of Tyler, one of two residential facilities that The Salvation Army operates for low-income and senior citizens via a federal government contract.

Though Disa Brown has a house she shares together with her fiancé and eighty three-yr-old father, she eats lunch at The Salvation Army two to 5 times every week, one thing she’s done off and on for the past 4 years.

“It simply is significant, because Tyler isn’t a large metropolis, and it doesn’t have a whole lot of assistance for us, so for this to be right here to feed us three meals a day, it means so much to lots of people who don’t have,” stated Ms. Brown, 36, who described herself as a homemaker and self-employed. “You by no means know when your life can turn around and you don’t have anything.”

These individuals are amongst a rising number of East Texas residents who’re going to The Salvation Army for meals.

This summer, the nonprofit has seen a 40% increase, from 5,000 to 7,000, in weekly meals served.

In addition, about 10% of the 127 shelter residents are within the facility due to climate.

The nonprofit has a 200-bed facility and further housing area for 250 cots for emergency situations. Water and cooling stations for short-term use can also be found.

Director of Development Cindy Bell mentioned, because the Salvation Army doesn’t survey their shoppers, they can’t formally attribute the rise to one thing in particular.

However anecdotally, they stated the summer season does create greater pressure on folks, as a result of rising utility cost, and people must make harder decisions about the way to spend their cash.

“I have to decide, ‘do I buy meals for my household or the medication that I need?” Ms. Bell mentioned.

Lindsey Galabeas, The Salvation Army’s community and public relations coordinator, mentioned when individuals already live paycheck to paycheck, any increase in expenses, makes it tougher.

For the organization, the challenge comes as a result of, despite the fact that the individuals utilizing its services are growing, donations are declining as they usually do throughout the summer season.

“Lots of people consider us as a Christmas group,” Ms. Galabeas stated. The fact is the group is largely active throughout  the year.

The nonprofit’s services include men’s, women’s and family shelters, free daily meals, a residential drug rehabilitation program, rent and utility assistance, emergency disaster services and afterschool programs.

The agency is seeking donations to help fund its programs, which is about $four million for the shelters, social services and administration buildings.

Ms. Bell stated the company has a lean budget, and 87 cents of each $1 donated goes to services.

Twitter: @TMTEmily



The Salvation Army of Tyler is in need of monetary donations to help fund the growing number of clients utilizing its services. For more details about The Salvation Army or to donate, go to , stop by the office at 633 N. Broadway Ave. in Tyler, or call 903-592-4361.



The Salvation Army serves three meals a day Sunday through Friday and two meals a day on Saturday. These free meals are open to the general public. Serving times are as follows:


Breakfast: 7 to 7:45 a.m.

Lunch: 12 to 12:45 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5 p.m.


Brunch: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.


Breakfast: 8 to 8:30 a.m.

Lunch: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.


Tim Tebow to help Salvation Army raise funds to aide the homeless

tim-tebowFormer NFL quarterback Tim Tebow will be helping the Salvation Army of Manatee County, Florida raise funds for the homeless people in their community.

He will be going to Florida in time for the “2015 Evening of Hope” event on May 15, which will be held at the Bayside Community Church.

According to the Bradenton Herald, Tebow will be the event’s guest of honour and speaker, and the well-known Christian athlete will be talking about his faith and the importance of supporting the homeless community.

The “Evening of Hope” was established in 2014 to support the Salvation Army and its local homeless-prevention services.

“We feel blessed to be able to partner with such well know advocates like Tim Tebow,” said Manatee County regional salvation coordinator Major Dwayne Durham.

Tebow is a dedicated philantropist who has spent a lot of time caring for children who have been abandoned or who are battling illnesses.

Through his own non-profit organisation called the Tim Tebow Foundation, the quarterback builds playrooms in children’s hospitals, supports couples who want to adopt but are struggling financially, and even hosts special parties for sick children just to make them happy.

“From a very early age, my parents instilled in me the importance of God’s word, the salvation we have in His Son Jesus and the responsibility we have to give back to others,” said Tebow, as he explained their mission “to bring Faith, Hope and Love to those needing a brighter day in their darkest hour of need.”

One of the latest efforts of his foundation is the 5th Annual Celebrity Gala and Golf Classic, where they raised more than $1.5 million. The funds raised will go to Tebow’s initiatives – Orphan Care, Tebow CURE Hospital, Night to Shine Prom, and Timmy’s Playroom.

On their Facebook page, Tebow revealed that “3,000 fans, 330 volunteers, 84 golfers and 26 celebrity friends came together for 18 holes of excitement” to help benefit their cause.


Relief for those struggling with high energy bills

FITCHBURG — With the combination of high energy costs and a cold winter, utility bills are especially painful this year, and organizers behind an annual private charitable fund are hoping local people will dig deep to help their neighbors.

For the past 30 years, Massachusetts utility companies have teamed up with the Salvation Army to create the Good Neighbor Energy Fund, which provides money for utility bill help for families who make too much money to qualify for state or federal energy-assistance funds.

“If someone is not eligible for fuel assistance, they would most likely be eligible for the Good Neighbor Energy Fund,” said Major Mark Hager of the Salvation Army’s Montachusett Corps Community Center in Fitchburg.

Hager said to his knowledge, the overwhelming source of funding is private donations from Massachusetts residents. The campaign’s fundraising goal is $550,000 this year, and he said participating families can expect to receive $275 this year. Energy and utility companies do contribute, however. On Thursday, the energy company TransCanada donated $15,000 to the Massachusetts Good Neighbor Energy Fund.

To be eligible to receive the fund, a household’s gross income must fall between 60 and 80 percent of the Massachusetts median income level. For example, a household of two people would have to have a total yearly income between $42,654 and $56,872 to qualify.

“The fund has experienced an increase in the number of inquiries by those families in need of energy assistance,” said Unitil’s Sue Corson, with customer-assistance programs, in a press release. “The reasons for more requests is the recent extreme weather and electric supply rates that are higher than last year for much of New England.”

Customers who receive bills through the mail are receiving green donation envelopes this month alongside their bills. Donations can also be made at, by calling 1-800-725-2769 or by sending checks made out to “Good Neighbor Energy Fund,” c/o The Salvation Army to 25 Shawmut Road, Canton, MA 02021-1408.

To apply for assistance through the program, call 1-800-334-3047.


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Community Events


The Salvation Army Annual Report 2014



The Salvation Army Annual Report

“He gathers the lambs in His arms and carries them close to His heart.”

This verse from the Book of Isaiah is the foundation for The Salvation Army’s 2013 Online Annual Report’s theme, “Open Arms”, now available here. Commissioner David Jeffery, The Salvation Army’s National Commander, had this verse come to mind saying, “It’s a sweet image, a beautiful reminder of the Lord’s gentleness in caring for the vulnerable”.

The Salvation Army strives to follow the Lord’s example of caring and opening our arms and our hearts to anyone in need. And we’re proud to report that, guided by God’s love and your compassion and support, The Salvation Army served 30 million Americans in 2013!

Throughout this last year and with the help of 3.5 million volunteers, The Salvation Army:
Served nearly 60 million meals to the hungry
Provided over 10 million nights of lodging to the homeless
Sent almost 200,000 low income and disadvantaged kids to summer camp
Counseled 180,000 men and women with drug and alcohol rehabilitation

Also featured in the annual report is an inspiring video of The Salvation Army’ s Angel Tree Program which helps provide nearly 1 million disadvantaged children across the United States.
As it truly takes an army, our services would not be possible without your help and support and we would like to take this opportunity to thank you for furthering our mission to Do The Most Good!
The Salvation Army is here for you. We welcome all with open doors, open hearts, and open arms.

Learn more through our annual report about The Salvation Army’s programs and services utilized by those in need in 2013.

Visit to read the 2013 Online Annual Report.


Surviving Abuse

Originally featured in The New Frontier Chronicle, a source of news and networking for The Salvation Army. Read more at
A first-hand account of addiction and recovery
By Sherita Mouzon

surviving abuse

Sherita Mouzon with her daughter

Growing up, we used to have to heat the house with kerosene heaters and they were old. The smell from the smoke would get into my clothes and the kids would tease me in school.

I later became a heavy cocaine user; even after I had my daughter at age 31, it was not enough to stop. I wanted to die. I knew God had put me on this earth for a reason and it couldn’t be this.

I grew up in poverty and food insecurity all my life. I witnessed domestic violence and was raped by age 9. I never had a stable home environment and grew up witnessing the multi-generational effects of poverty. I knew I wanted a better life for myself, but did not know how to get there. I was also suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and untreated trauma, so my life was filled with drug use and risky behavior. I didn’t see a future for myself.

When I didn’t have money to buy my daughter anything for Christmas in 2008, I wrote to President Barack Obama requesting a present for my daughter. The White House forwarded my letter to a Salvation Army center in Philadelphia. I received help from one of the social workers there, who gave me three $20 Walmart gift cards and two bags of food.

Shortly after that act of kindness, I joined the Witness to Hunger program at Philadelphia’s Drexel University School of Public Health in 2010. Witness to Hunger is a research and advocacy project that partners with real experts on hunger—mothers and caregivers of young children who have experienced hunger and poverty. Through photographs, “witnesses” advocate for their own families and others and seek to create lasting changes on a local, state and national level.

With my involvement in the program, I was able to get self-help group training based on the sanctuary model by Dr. Sandra Bloom at Drexel University. The sanctuary model is a support group that teaches people how to talk about and heal from trauma and focuses on four main bodies of knowledge: trauma theory, social learning moral intelligence, democracy and complexity theory.

Through this process I realized why I was having self-destructive behavior. I had attachment disorder from my mother never being emotionally present to me and I had PTSD by witnessing the abuse my mom suffered at the hands of my brother’s father. I was also suffering from the shame of being raped by my babysitter’s female daughter. Only by going to a self-help group was I able to heal from the trauma I had suffered for so many years.

After this training, I began working for Drexel and then at the Kroc Center as a peer mentor and running self-help groups. The Salvation Army also wanted this program at the Temple Corps, the same place The White House had sent my letter three years before.

Currently I’m a peer-mentoring caseworker for The Salvation Army and I run self-help groups for the community as well as staff and interns. The Lord has given me a way to share my story and also mentor others. I was not able to help myself until I accepted the Lord’s help. He put me here in this program for a reason.

I’m now sober and living with my husband and daughter. I want people to know that with God’s help any and all things are possible. I was lonely, depressed and angry, and I know other people out there feel the same way and I want to help those people. That’s what this program does.

Col. Joe Posillico (right) and Maj John Brackenbury meet the Goodwill mascot at the grand opening.

Goodwill and Salvation Army Team Up to help Arizonans find jobs

goodwill salvation army

Col. Joe Posillico (right) and Maj John Brackenbury meet the Goodwill mascot at the grand opening.

Originally featured on Expect Change, The Salvation Army Western Territory’s Blog.

I’ve worked for The Salvation Army for fifteen years. Along the way my friends will sometimes ask, “so how are things at the Goodwill?” Sometimes they say, “so, what’s going on at the Red Cross?”

My reply is usually, “I’m sure they’re doing great things like meeting needs and changing lives, but I work for The Salvation Army.” Well, now I can answer that question about Goodwill wholeheartedly in the affirmative because I know first-hand!

We recently teamed up with Goodwill of Central Arizona to open a job resource center on our Salvation Army campus in Phoenix. This first-of-its-kind center features 11 computer workstations with access to Goodwill’s database of jobs, as well as a staff member to help job seekers with services including resume development and interview strategy.

How’s that for putting two great organizations together to care for people in need!?
The center is a three-minute walk from The Salvation Army’s family shelter and located in a neighborhood with one of the highest rates of poverty in Arizona.
We’re praying that job-seekers all over Phoenix will find it a convenient place to go to learn job skills and receive assistance with their search.

Here’s what AZCentral had to say about the great news (FYI: it starts with a brief ad):

“Thank you Goodwill of Central Arizona! We love what you do and are grateful for your help.”


If you’d like to know more about what The Salvation Army does in Phoenix, please connect with them on Facebook:: If you’d like to make a financial gift to help The Salvation Army in the Phoenix area, please click here


Hanes Sock Donation Warms The Hearts & Feet of Shelter Residents

hanes sock

Learn more at

Socks are easy to take for granted. If you’re like me, you have a drawer dedicated to single socks missing their pair, or loud printed pairs meant for only Christmas or Halloween.

Most people are surprised to learn that basic socks are the number one requested item at our homeless shelters. They are the most needed, but least donated article of clothing. And even though folks served by The Salvation Army may have greater needs such as shelter or food, they consistently get excited when offered a new pair of socks. Because honestly, nothing feels as good as a new pair, especially for someone used to wearing damaged, dirty or no socks at all.

This is why we’re thrilled that our generous friends at Hanes, America’s #1 sock brand, are once again warming the hearts and feet of our shelter residents by donating 225,000 pairs of socks to benefit The Salvation Army’s residential facilities.
(Learn how donating this simple item can make a real difference!)

For Hanes’ continued support of Americans in need this holiday season, please help us show them some love by liking Hanes’ Facebook page at! You can also find them on Twitter at using #HanesforGood.

A huge thank you to Hanes for their incredible partnership which benefits so many in need.


Posted by Megan on Wednesday, December 11, 2013


Gold coin found in Salvation Army kettle

gold coin salvation army

Volunteers manning Salvation Army kettles in Naperville found a valuable gold coin amid the pocket change.

A 1-ounce South African Krugerrand worth about $1,300 was dropped into a kettle at Casey’s Foods on Dec. 6, according to the group. Casey’s was the site of a Krugerrand donation last year and also had a donor match contributions.

“We are so grateful for the generosity of our wonderful donors,” Salvation Army Aurora Corps Capt. Antonio Romero said in a news release. “The money raised from these red kettles goes directly to help fund the programs and services right here in our communities, so this coin will go a long way toward helping our friends and neighbors in need.”

Over the course of more than 25 years, the Salvation Army has received more than 400 gold coins, according to the group. Money donated in the kettles stay assists people in need with food, shelter, after-school programs and disaster relief.

So far this season, the Salvation Army’s Red Kettle Campaign has brought in more than $3.3 million, down about 8 percent compared to this time last year, which officials are attributing to the shorter holiday season. The group’s goal is to raise $13 million and it will have kettles on the streets until Dec. 24. Donations can also be made online through Jan. 31 at

By Melissa Jenco, Chicago Tribune reporter


Salvation Army ringer sets 105-hour ring record

world record bell ringing competition

COLTON, Calif.—Salvation Army Maj. Marcelino “Butch” Soriano got a jump on ringing in the New Year this holiday season by ringing a bell for a record 105 consecutive hours outside a Wal-Mart in Colton this week.
The San Diego man’s reward: An estimated $2,700 he raised for charity and his name in the Salvation Army’s bell-ringing record book alongside those of fellow ringers James Brickson of Albert Lea, Minn., and Andre Thompson of Tyler, Texas, who matched him hour-for-hour.

“I feel a little bit tired, not as tired as I thought I would be,” he told UT San Diego ( after putting down his ringer at 6 p.m. Saturday. “I’m excited the other people all agreed to stop at the same time, so now we have a three-way tie.”

He had originally planned to go for 100 hours, which would have shattered the old mark of 80 that was set last year. After reaching that mark, he considered ringing on until midnight before reaching agreement with his fellow ringers to stop at 6.

There were six contestants when the competition began Tuesday morning.

The rules allowed each ringer a five-minute break every hour that could be rolled over if they chose. Soriano, 46, would save his up so that he could take a 20-minute nap each day.

He said he never considered stopping, not even after someone stole his laptop before dawn Saturday.

“I’m doing great!” he said later Saturday. “People are coming up to me saying, ‘I saw you on the news, go for it, we know you can do it.'”

see the full article here
Associated Press