Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its services

Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its servicesFernando Mena sat at a cafeteria table consuming a hot dog, chili and potato chips.

The 25-yr-old who stated he lives in the woods began going to The Salvation Army 3 times a day for meals after recently quitting his job cleaning at a fast-food restaurant. Mena cited well being issues as the rationale behind quitting his job and stated he’s in search of temp jobs.

At one other table, Artherine Booth, seventy five, sat with a few buddies. Ms. Booth moved in to The Salvation Army ladies’s shelter in June after having to leave her previous residence.

She is planning to move into the Catherine Booth Gardens of Tyler, one of two residential facilities that The Salvation Army operates for low-income and senior citizens via a federal government contract.

Though Disa Brown has a house she shares together with her fiancé and eighty three-yr-old father, she eats lunch at The Salvation Army two to 5 times every week, one thing she’s done off and on for the past 4 years.

“It simply is significant, because Tyler isn’t a large metropolis, and it doesn’t have a whole lot of assistance for us, so for this to be right here to feed us three meals a day, it means so much to lots of people who don’t have,” stated Ms. Brown, 36, who described herself as a homemaker and self-employed. “You by no means know when your life can turn around and you don’t have anything.”

These individuals are amongst a rising number of East Texas residents who’re going to The Salvation Army for meals.

This summer, the nonprofit has seen a 40% increase, from 5,000 to 7,000, in weekly meals served.

In addition, about 10% of the 127 shelter residents are within the facility due to climate.

The nonprofit has a 200-bed facility and further housing area for 250 cots for emergency situations. Water and cooling stations for short-term use can also be found.

Director of Development Cindy Bell mentioned, because the Salvation Army doesn’t survey their shoppers, they can’t formally attribute the rise to one thing in particular.

However anecdotally, they stated the summer season does create greater pressure on folks, as a result of rising utility cost, and people must make harder decisions about the way to spend their cash.

“I have to decide, ‘do I buy meals for my household or the medication that I need?” Ms. Bell mentioned.

Lindsey Galabeas, The Salvation Army’s community and public relations coordinator, mentioned when individuals already live paycheck to paycheck, any increase in expenses, makes it tougher.

For the organization, the challenge comes as a result of, despite the fact that the individuals utilizing its services are growing, donations are declining as they usually do throughout the summer season.

“Lots of people consider us as a Christmas group,” Ms. Galabeas stated. The fact is the group is largely active throughout  the year.

The nonprofit’s services include men’s, women’s and family shelters, free daily meals, a residential drug rehabilitation program, rent and utility assistance, emergency disaster services and afterschool programs.

The agency is seeking donations to help fund its programs, which is about $four million for the shelters, social services and administration buildings.

Ms. Bell stated the company has a lean budget, and 87 cents of each $1 donated goes to services.

Twitter: @TMTEmily



The Salvation Army of Tyler is in need of monetary donations to help fund the growing number of clients utilizing its services. For more details about The Salvation Army or to donate, go to , stop by the office at 633 N. Broadway Ave. in Tyler, or call 903-592-4361.



The Salvation Army serves three meals a day Sunday through Friday and two meals a day on Saturday. These free meals are open to the general public. Serving times are as follows:


Breakfast: 7 to 7:45 a.m.

Lunch: 12 to 12:45 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5 p.m.


Brunch: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.


Breakfast: 8 to 8:30 a.m.

Lunch: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.


Charging station for homeless

Charging station for homeless

Homeless Charging Station

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Following the misdemeanor arrest of two homeless individuals in Portland for utilizing an outdoor energy outlet to charge their cell phones, Salvation Army staff have created a cellphone charging station.

The Oregonian reports ( that the Salvation Army Female Emergency Shelter announced Tuesday that it has 5 USB ports and 4 electrical outlets accessible for any homeless woman who needs to charge their phone and doesn’t cost a thing.

Salvation Army spokeswoman Teresa Steinmetz says keeping electrical devices working is essential to holding down a job, a spot to dwell and different connections.

Final yr two homeless individuals had been charged with misdemeanor theft of services once they had been discovered charging their cell phones at an outside electrical outlet. Under Oregon regulation, there isn’t any minimal financial loss for theft costs. Each charge has since been dropped.

bike across america

Bike across America 2 end hunger

bike across america 2 end hunger

SOUTH BEND – One of the hundreds of bikers out there today had an especially long trip.

This is Martin Cooper from the Salvation Army. His ride started all the way in  Medford, Oregon.

That’s more than two-thousand miles away and he is riding across the country to raise money and awareness to help end children’s hunger.

“I’ve been thinking about it for four or five years,” he said. “I just thought, when I retire, there has to be some way that I can help people. And you know, I don’t need to just go out and bug everybody in the community, so I thought I would ride across America.”

He plans to ride all the way to Washington DC – that will be a trip of 28-hundred miles.

He says he actually didn’t know about the Bike the Bend today. He was just planning to stop by the Kroc Center and he saw it on his way in.

Bike Across America 2 end Hunger

You can find more information about Martin over at his website on Facebook:

Kroc Center

Summer Camps at the Salvation Army Kroc Center

summer camps

The Salvation Army Kroc Center in Suisun City is offering a lineup of summer camps.

Grade K-6 children can participate in themed day camps that include enrichment activities, swimming and other physical activities, a daily devotional, field trips, and many other fun choices, Kroc officials said.

The goal is for participants to acquire new skills, learn new concepts, and make friends, all while enjoying their summer vacation in a safe, nurturing, and educational environment. Children will have opportunities to “add-on” additional activities (sport camps, field trips, swim lessons) for additional fees.

Early bird registration for premium camp is $165 a week and for regular camp, $130 a week.

Late registration (3 days prior to week of camp) is $190 a week for premium camp, and $150 for regular camp.

Camps schedules and themes include:

June 8-12: Swim Camp

June15-19: Puttin’ on the Hits

June 22-26: Sports Camp

June 29-July 3: Camp Construct: Legos!

July 6-10: Urban Music

July 13 -17: Survival!

July 20-24: Music Camp

July 27-31: Camp Del Oro (ages 7-12)

Aug. 3-7: World Expo

salvation army

Gov’t of Liberia Gives $140K to The Salvation Army’s William Booth High School for Facelift

liberia salvation army

Monrovia — The Government of Liberia on April 8, 2015 presented a check in the amount of one hundred forty thousand, one hundred and fifty-five United States dollars (140,155), to the administration and officer in-Charge of the Salvation Army’s William Booth Junior & Senior High School that was gutted by fire on March 4th 2015.

Presenting the check on behalf of the Government, Liberia’s Assistant minister for Budget and Development planning Hon. Augustin K. Blama said restoring the burnt structure and providing furniture to enable the 983 students get back to classes are the result of the government commitment to providing education to all regardless of the sector.

He said, that the project is expected to be completed within 3o-days and believes upon completion it will change the narratives of warehouses and computer rooms and library been used for classrooms “it is imperative for our student at William Booth continues to learn in a conducive and healthy atmosphere free from fear of fire and crime” he added.

Minister Blama also encouraged students of the William Booth School to always seek to strive for the top and to report any suspicious activity that might affect their institution. He said the government remains steadfast in its continual commitment to educating the future generation of this country.

For her part, the Minister of Education Hon. Etmonia Tarpel expressed her frustration and disappointment over the burning of the school infrastructure. She, however, encouraged the family of the institution to be strong and keep the good work on going. ‘Those that did the act thought they were reigning evil upon this school, but let it be known that God has turned the evil into blessing” she added. She said the government will support your effort to the fullest in ensuring that our students are free from this unacceptable encounter.

In a brief remark, the Officer-in Charge of the Salvation Army Col. Gabriel Kathuri extend his gratitude to the government for rapid intervention to solve the unexpected distraction that have reduced our classrooms to warehouse, library computer lab etc. He said, with God, they shall bounce back and even shine brighter than before. Col. Kathuri at the same time encouraged those that cause this disaster to come out and confess.

The Salvation Army’s William Booth Junior & senior High School was gutted by fire on March 4, 2015, thus posting a serious hindrance which to a greater extend has prevented the institution from carrying out its normal academic activities.


Salvation Army fresh food initiative providing Weekly Fresh fruits & vegetables

Fresh Food Initiative.HILLSDALE — On a dreary, blustery and cold Tuesday morning, Hillsdale County residents lined up outside of the Hillsdale Salvation Army to receive fresh food, part of the organizations Fresh Food Initiative.

The initiative, which began in June of 2012, provides those residents in need with a box of fresh food, breads and a dessert.

Sue LeFevre, a Salvation Army employee, said they don’t know week to week what will be on the truck until it arrives each Tuesday morning.
The fresh food initiative gives residents a healthy food option.

“For those residents who are looking for options in cooking the fresh food, we are more than happy to help with recipes,” said Kathy Stump, Salvation Army administrative assistant.

The Salvation Army pays a $300 delivery fee a week from the Food Bank of South Central Michigan for the food, which will feed around 250 families.
Volunteers from the Hope House in Jonesville help the Salvation Army staff pack boxes and bag vegetables on a weekly basis.

During the month of March, 30 unduplicated volunteers contributed 217 hours of service.

Tuesday morning Michele Dropulich and LeAnn Voigtritter, volunteers from the Hope House, were busy packing bags with fresh green beans to be added to the boxes.
“I’ve been on both sides of the line,” Dropulich said. “It feels good to give back with a smile — this is a way I can give back.”

“The house has given me an opportunity. It feels good to be able to pay it forward,” she added.

Food distribution is from 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Tuesday.

Stump said it is open to anyone that is in need of food, no questions asked.

She said lately they have been averaging around 150 families a week.

The remaining food is distributed to other food banks around Hillsdale County.

She said the food has to be distributed fairly quickly, because it is close to its expiration date when it is received.

During the month of March, 604 families or 1,709 individuals were assisted, 372 of which were children. The wholesale value of the food distributed was $48,690.59. The Salvation Army paid $1,200 for the food.

The Salvation Army also offers a free lunch from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. The emergency food pantry is open from 9 a.m. to noon and 1-3 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
By Andy Barrand

Lubbock Salvation Army helps homeless

Lubbock Salvation Army assists the homeless

Lubbock Salvation Army helps homelessEven with the spring semester coming to an end, Lubbock’s morning breeze and nightly cool temperatures have remained constant. For Lubbock’s homeless population, this often means long, cold nights.

With the help of organizations and volunteers like those in the Salvation Army, individuals are able to bring warmth and aid to those in need, especially during extremely cold conditions.

“We provide a couple of different services to the lower-income community,” Shannon Sudduth, the community relations and development coordinator at the Lubbock Salvation Army, said.

Sudduth has worked actively toward helping the homeless community, she said. Sudduth graduated LCU with a major in organizational communications and is currently working toward her graduate degree at Tech in mass communications. Salvation Army has an event called Survive the Night.

Survive the Night involves active participation of volunteers helping the homeless community around Lubbock get shelter, food and disaster relief.

“We take our truck around during 30 degrees or below temperatures around 6 p.m. during the months of November to mid-February,” Sudduth said. “We drive around downtown looking for homeless community who aren’t able to get back to our shelter and provide them with blankets, warm clothing like scarves, beanies, gloves, that sort of thing.”

Sudduth said during the winter the Salvation Army asks for donations and blankets and they are later put in the building’s storage unit to be supplied to those in need during the right time. Tech students usually help out in the shelter, she said, helping arrange bags containing blankets and hygiene kits. Sudduth said during January there is a sign-up sheet for volunteers to help on their rounds for Survive the Night.

“The program is designed to try and help people survive the night,” Dave Frericks, the disaster coordinator at the Lubbock Salvation Army, said. “Nights we go out and find them on the street and provide them with socks, caps and a hot meal. And if they want we can bring them to the shelter for the night so they can survive one more day.“

Salvation Army recruited Frericks after his work in the government as an advisory board member in the disaster team during 1994.

“One night in February we went out during 12-degree weather. The wind was blowing and we happened to find a fellow sleeping on a bench. He was wearing a T-shirt and shorts,” Frericks said. “He was shaking so badly he could barely stand up. We got him in down here and there was no question in my mind, I wanted to save his life. He would have died right there.”

According to the Tech website students often volunteer with Salvation Army during Tech Lubbock Community Day and with other organizations like Raiders Helping Others.

Tashika Curlee, a senior English and sociology dual major from Paris, Texas, has volunteered with the Boys & Girls Club, Habitat for Humanity, the South Plains Food Bank and the Salvation Army.

Curlee said that she had previously volunteered with the Salvation Army along with her organization Pegasus.

“From everything that I had heard, the Salvation Army was an organization meant to help those who were struggling within the community,” she said.

Most of the students who volunteer at the Salvation Army are assigned to meal preparation, cleaning or other basic duties, she said. Curlee was able to be a part of the volunteer team through the preparation of meals.

During her time volunteering, Curlee said she felt like she really got to know the staff and the work they put forth, in addition to those individuals in need.

“Most of the people were so nice and had an amazing attitude regardless of their circumstances. One family that is burned into my memory is that of a Hispanic father and his two young daughters,” she said. “The daughters were smiling and playing around with each other. They were not the only family we served that day, there were some others as well.”

Volunteering is an important part of being a member of a community, Curlee said. Community means helping others.

“As a college student, I recognize that I would not be here getting a higher education if not for the generosity of those within our community in giving out scholarships and other forms of financial aid,” Curlee said. “Therefore, I believe volunteering at any level showcases how thankful I am and my desire to give back to a community that has given me so much.”


Foodie events & Food Drive in Southwest Florida



Feeding Our Communities | Fifth Third Bank (South Florida) has partnered with The Salvation Army to collect 5,300 pounds of non-perishable food items during the “Feeding our Communities” food drive. Bank employees and customers – as well as local businesses and community residents – are encouraged to contribute non-perishable food items. Donations will be accepted at all Fifth Third Bank (South Florida) branches through April 24. Food collection bins are set up at all 53 Fifth Third banking centers. 449-7088.

Wednesday, April 1

  • Feeding Our Communities Fifth Third Bank (South Florida) has partnered with The Salvation Army to collect 5,300 pounds of non-perishable food items during the “Feeding our Communities” food drive. Bank employees and customers – as well as local businesses and community residents – are encouraged to contribute non-perishable food items. Donations will be accepted at all Fifth Third Bank (South Florida) branches through April 24. Food collection bins are set up at all 53 Fifth Third banking centers. 449-7088.
  • Flavors of Matlacha Tour This delightful history, public art, eco and taste adventure combines Matlacha’s salty history with the signature tastes of this cracker fishing village-turned artist colony. Tours begin at The Lovegrove Gallery & Gardens, 4637 Pine Island Road NW, Matlacha. $13. 10 a.m. Wednesdays. Reservations required 945-0405.
  • Health Park Farmers Market Farmers Market comes to Health Park, featuring the finest local produce and citrus. Joined with specialty vendors to offer many wonderful foods and craft products. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The Village Shoppes at Health Park, 16200 Summerlin Road, Fort Myers. 470-9007.

Thursday, April 2

  • Coconut Point Farmers Market Peruse the market for fresh produce, local seafood, meats, beautiful flowers, locally harvested honey, baked goods, and even dog treats! You can also find one-of-a-kind handcrafts for sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursdays. Coconut Point, 23130 Fashion Drive, Estero. 691-9249
  • Lobstermania Every Thursday Parrot Key offers a variety of lobster specials. Choose to have it steamed, baked, broiled or get a set of twin lobster tails. 4-10 p.m. Parrot Key Caribbean Grill, 2500 Main St., Fort Myers Beach, 463-3257.
  • Wicked Dolphin Rum Distillery Tours and Tastings Come see how award winning Wicked Dolphin Florida Rum is made. Tours are available Tuesdays, Thursdays at 1, 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Wicked Dolphin Distillery, 131 SW 3rd Place, Cape Coral, 242-5244.

Friday, April 3

  • Lakes Park Farmers Market one of the largest in Lee County, this farmer’s market has over 60 vendors offering fresh produce, fruit smoothies, meats, seafood, and more. Also, look for unique and hand-crafted gifts. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Fridays. Lakes Park, 7330 Gladiolus Drive, south Fort Myers. 691-9249.

Saturday, April 4

  • Bonita Springs Farmers Market locally grown and produced items including everything from garden-fresh fruits and vegetables to cut flowers, decorative plants, baked goods, seafood, honey, and more. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Promenade At Bonita Bay, 26811 S. Bay Drive, Bonita Springs. 691-9249.
  • Cape Coral Farmers’ Market Fresh local produce, Gulf-fresh seafood, baked goods, native plants and trees, crafts, jewelry, and live music by Dave Lapio, John Friday and Yard Dog Charlie. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays, through May 9. Authorized EBT/SNAP. Cape Coral Farmer’s Market, SE 47th Terrace and SE 10th Place, Club Square, Cape Coral. 549-6900.
  • Greenmarket Farmers Market Find local produce, seafood, honey, cheeses, baked goods, plants and gardening supplies, and more. Live music, free Wi-Fi, and free classes in a natural setting that the family can enjoy. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Alliance for the Arts, 10091 McGregor Blvd., Fort Myers, 939-2787.

Sunday, April 5

  • Champagne Jazz Brunch Brunch hours 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Enjoy a fantastic seafood, champagne brunch and relaxing jazz music with Jazz Duo: Vocalist, Jean Frye Sidwell and Bassist, Chris Sidwell. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $49 adults, $24 children age 5-12, free age 5 and younger. Hyatt Regency Coconut Point, 5001 Coconut Rd, Bonita Springs, 444-1234.
  • Farmers Market Koreshan State Historic Site will be hosting a Farmers Market starting Nov. 9 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. To date, there are over 25 vendors registered with the best fruits and vegetables to be found along with many other items. $5 parking fee. Koreshan State Historic Site, 3800 Corkscrew Road, Estero, 992-0311.
  • Sunday Brunch Piano and vocals for Sunday brunch with Michael Moore-Kelly, open to the public. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Herons Glen Golf and Country Club, 2250 Avenida Del Vera, North Fort Myers, 731-4545.
  • Special Easter Menu Naples Grande Beach Resort’s brand-new vibrant seafood restaurant, The Catch of the Pelican, is offering a three course pre-fixe menu for Easter on Sunday, April 5. The menu will feature locally sourced produce from Chef Tim Yoa’s on-site farm and Rabbit Run Farm and diners can also choose items from the raw bar, fresh seafood from the “catches” section of the menu, and steaks. Reservations can be made through the resort’s website or by calling 855-453-0716. noon-8 p.m. $59. Naples Grande Beach Resort, 475 Seagate Drive, Naples
  • Sanibel Island Farmers Market This must-see shopping destination with over 45 vendors is home to our area’s most treasured natural assets. Browse for fresh bread, local produce, honey, seafood, meats, and cheeses. Sundays 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sanibel City Hall, 800 Dunlop Road, Sanibel. 691-9249 .
  • Sunday Jazz Brunch extensive buffet and made to order omelets and Eggs Benedict. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $13 adults, $7 children 10 and younger. George and Wendy’s Sanibel Seafood Grille, 2499 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel. 395-1263.
  • Village Green Market Enjoy a green market by the bay every Sunday offering fresh produce, handmade and homemade specialties, and fine foods. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. The Village on Venetian Bay, 4200 Gulfshore Blvd. N., Naples. 403-2202.

Monday, April 6

  • Fletchers Farmers Market Fresh Local Produce, Local Vendors 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays. Fletchers Farmers Market, 627 Cape Coral Parkway W, Cape Coral, 542-7878.
  • Monday Rib Night Full rack of slow cooked baby back ribs served with fries and slaw. 5-10 p.m. $18. George and Wendy’s Sanibel Seafood Grille, 2499 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel. 395-1263.

Tuesday, April 7

  • Homemade Spaghetti and Meatball dinner Dine in for $6 or take out $6.25 and is open to the public from 5-7 p.m. American Legion Post 38, 1857 Jackson St., Fort Myers, 332-1853.
  • Lunch Cruise This cruise focuses on the fishing cultures of Pine Island Sound from the indigenous Calusa to the spectacular Tarpon and sport fishing of today. Inclues lunch at the Historic Tarpon Lodge and guided walk on the Calusa Indian Mound Trail. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $45 adult, $35 children. Captiva Cruises-McCarthy’s Marina, 11401 Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva, 472-5300.
  • Surfside Sunset Market indoor shopping from May to November, outside November thru April. Fresh, healthy and local produce bakery items, Micro-greens, handcrafted soaps and lotions, local honey, jams and jellies and more. 3-8 p.m. Tuesdays. The Shops at Surfside, 2354 Surfside Blvd., Cape Coral, 549-6900 ext 101.

Saturday, April 11

  • Fairy Tea Party Enjoy treats, tea sandwiches, punch and tea in the butterfly garden. Feel free to wear fairy or butterfly wings. Registration is required at least one week in advance and there is a limited number of spaces. (3-12 years)The Fairy Tea Party is also available as a private party – call to make special arrangements. 11 a.m.- noon. $15-$23. Rotary Park, 5505 Rose Garden Road, Cape Coral, 549-4606.
  • Fifth Annual Crawfish Boil The Boys & Girls Club of Collier County is hosting the Fifth Annual Crawfish Boil on April 11, starting at 3 p.m. The event is open to the public and will feature authentic Louisiana themed food and crawfish, live entertainment, activities, raffles, give-a-ways and more. Tickets are $25. Kids 12 and under are free. The event is a friendraiser, to increase awareness of the Club and the valuable resources it offers to our local community. All proceeds will benefit 3,000 of the most at-risk children and teens in Collier County. 3-7 p.m. Boys & Girls Club, 7500 Davis Blvd, Naples, 325-1718.
  • Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser Luvybear Quilts 4 Tots fundraiser with door prizes, raffles, special entertainment and more. $5 for adults and $3 for kids 8 and younger. 8 a.m.-noon. Italian American Club, 4725 Vincennes Blvd., Cape Coral. 770-8277.
empty bowls

Salvation Army’s ‘Empty Bowls’ feed the hungry

empty bowlsSometimes it’s easy to forget, so some people tie a string around their fingers to remind them of something they are supposed to do or somewhere they are supposed to go.

If Kim May, director of the Pike County Salvation Army Service Center, could tie a string around 32,000 fingers to remind people of the Salvation Army’s Empty Bowls Luncheon on April 17 she would.

The annual Empty Bowls Luncheon is the Salvation Army’s second largest fundraiser behind the Red Kettle Campaign.

“The Empty Bowls Luncheon is an important fundraiser because the funds raised benefit our food bank,” May said. “Every day, we serve those who are in need of food for different reasons. Many of our requests for food come from elderly people who are living on fixed incomes. They often have to choose between buying food and having their prescriptions filled or refilled. They usually choose their medicines.”

May said when the weather is unusually cold or hot and utility bills skyrocket, requests for food increases.

“There’s not a day that goes by that we don’t have requests for assistance with food,’ she said. “We always need money to purchase items that are not readily donated, especially proteins and dry milk.”

May said the Empty Bowls Luncheon, not only supports the Salvation Army Food Bank; it’s also an art project and a social gathering.

“The funds from the Empty Bowls Luncheon feed the hungry in our community,” May said. “The luncheon is a gathering place for the community and there’s a wide selection of homemade soups, chilies and stews. Retired chef Ron Case always makes his famous Tortellini soup and Donna McLaney makes her award-winning chili. Local restaurants bring their specialty soups. You won’t find a better or wider selection of ‘bowl meals’ anywhere.”

Tickets for the Empty Bowls Luncheon are $20 and each ticket holder gets to take home a handmade bowl from a selection of about 150.

“This year, we’ll have bowls made by Larry Percy’s ceramics classes at Troy University and art students at Pike County High School and Pike Liberal Arts School,” May said. “The Global Studies class made bowls also.”

Leadership Pike participants and employees at First National Bank and Army Aviation made bowls for the Empty Bowls Luncheon.

“We have some beautiful bowls and some very unique bowls. They are all one of a kind,” May said. “The earlier you come to the luncheon, the greater your choice of bowls. So, we encourage everyone to come early and select a bowl and then enjoy a soup lunch and the fellowship of friends.”

The Empty Bowls Luncheon will be from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Bush Memorial Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. Bush Memorial is located on George Wallace Drive in Troy.


By: Jaine Treadwell


Tim Tebow to help Salvation Army raise funds to aide the homeless

tim-tebowFormer NFL quarterback Tim Tebow will be helping the Salvation Army of Manatee County, Florida raise funds for the homeless people in their community.

He will be going to Florida in time for the “2015 Evening of Hope” event on May 15, which will be held at the Bayside Community Church.

According to the Bradenton Herald, Tebow will be the event’s guest of honour and speaker, and the well-known Christian athlete will be talking about his faith and the importance of supporting the homeless community.

The “Evening of Hope” was established in 2014 to support the Salvation Army and its local homeless-prevention services.

“We feel blessed to be able to partner with such well know advocates like Tim Tebow,” said Manatee County regional salvation coordinator Major Dwayne Durham.

Tebow is a dedicated philantropist who has spent a lot of time caring for children who have been abandoned or who are battling illnesses.

Through his own non-profit organisation called the Tim Tebow Foundation, the quarterback builds playrooms in children’s hospitals, supports couples who want to adopt but are struggling financially, and even hosts special parties for sick children just to make them happy.

“From a very early age, my parents instilled in me the importance of God’s word, the salvation we have in His Son Jesus and the responsibility we have to give back to others,” said Tebow, as he explained their mission “to bring Faith, Hope and Love to those needing a brighter day in their darkest hour of need.”

One of the latest efforts of his foundation is the 5th Annual Celebrity Gala and Golf Classic, where they raised more than $1.5 million. The funds raised will go to Tebow’s initiatives – Orphan Care, Tebow CURE Hospital, Night to Shine Prom, and Timmy’s Playroom.

On their Facebook page, Tebow revealed that “3,000 fans, 330 volunteers, 84 golfers and 26 celebrity friends came together for 18 holes of excitement” to help benefit their cause.