donut day

Celebrate National Donut Day with free donuts from LaMar’s

free donutsLaMar’s Donuts is giving away free doughnuts in Fort Collins Friday to celebrate National Donut Day.

The Kansas City, Missouri-based company is partnering with Salvation Army to help raise money during the annual event. Donation kettles will be placed in participating LaMar’s locations including the two doughnut shops in Fort Collins — 1101 W. Drake Road and 140 E. Boardwalk Drive.

In addition to the donation kettles, LaMar’s will give a portion of this week’s sales to Salvation Army to support programs that provide meals to children in need. The company has 27 stores in throughout six states.

“The Salvation Army’s tireless mission to keep children clothed, sheltered and fed is an enduring reminder that many of our neighbors are in need,” LaMar’s spokesperson Temi Osifodunrin said in a statement. “LaMar’s is inviting communities we serve into our shops for free donuts and ask only that they consider donating to a praiseworthy cause.”

Customers aren’t required to make purchases to receive their free doughnuts Friday. The free-doughnut offer is good for any regular doughnut already available.

National Donut Day is celebrated the first Friday of June, a tradition dating to 1917, when women Salvation Army volunteers known as “Lassies” made doughnuts for soldiers on the front lines of World War I.

Dunkin’ Donuts is also celebrating the holiday by giving free doughnuts to customers who purchase beverages. On Oct. 28, the Massachusetts-based doughnut shop opened a location at 2801 S. College Ave, in Fort Collins.

By:Adrian D. Garcia

Kroc Center

Summer Camps at the Salvation Army Kroc Center

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The Salvation Army Kroc Center in Suisun City is offering a lineup of summer camps.

Grade K-6 children can participate in themed day camps that include enrichment activities, swimming and other physical activities, a daily devotional, field trips, and many other fun choices, Kroc officials said.

The goal is for participants to acquire new skills, learn new concepts, and make friends, all while enjoying their summer vacation in a safe, nurturing, and educational environment. Children will have opportunities to “add-on” additional activities (sport camps, field trips, swim lessons) for additional fees.

Early bird registration for premium camp is $165 a week and for regular camp, $130 a week.

Late registration (3 days prior to week of camp) is $190 a week for premium camp, and $150 for regular camp.

Camps schedules and themes include:

June 8-12: Swim Camp

June15-19: Puttin’ on the Hits

June 22-26: Sports Camp

June 29-July 3: Camp Construct: Legos!

July 6-10: Urban Music

July 13 -17: Survival!

July 20-24: Music Camp

July 27-31: Camp Del Oro (ages 7-12)

Aug. 3-7: World Expo

Kroc Center

National Study Quantifies Impact of Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Centers

Kroc Center

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (May 18, 2015) – Eleven years after Joan Kroc’s historic $1.5 billion bequest to The Salvation Army, 26 Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers are now open across the country, providing a variety of cultural, educational, fitness and social programs in neighborhoods that historically have lacked them. In a study commissioned by The Salvation Army, researchers at Partners for Sacred Places and McClanahan Associates, Inc. quantified the annual positive social and economic impact these centers are creating for and in their communities, totaling $258,178,776 (based on 2014 data).

Today, President Obama will visit the newest Kroc Center, in Camden, N.J., highlighting the impact that investment in facilities and programs like Kroc Centers can have on the long-term health of local communities.

The Kroc Centers are state-of-the-art venues typically located in underserved communities, where children and families can be exposed to a variety of people, activities and arts that would otherwise be beyond their reach. The Centers enhance quality of life by providing a safe environment with an emphasis on fitness and health, the arts and opportunities to build social connections.

“The research demonstrates in a quantifiable way the social and economic impact the Kroc Centers are having on people from the local community. They come, they get healthy, and they make important social connections. That’s the hallmark of what a Kroc Center is, and it creates a bona fide ‘Economic Halo Effect’ of positive benefits,” said Commissioner David Jeffrey, National Commander of The Salvation Army.

The study included the 25 Kroc Centers that had been open for at least six months by the end of 2014 (the Camden Kroc Center was not included because it opened in October 2014). The report is based on more than 100 interviews with staff, officers, participants, volunteers and community leaders; surveys of a representative sample of 1,580 patrons; and a review of operations-related documentation. Researchers looked at six areas:

  • $99,195,478 – Direct spending by the centers to hire a total of 797 full-time and 2,288 part-time staff, and to buy local goods and services
  • $70,601,194 – Invisible safety net: various catalyzing or leveraging economic values for center users including membership subsidies, scholarships, space and in-kind support to individuals and community-serving programs
  • $48,738,141 – The value of people getting and staying healthier
  • $30,986,249 – Magnet effect of induced spending in the local community by center visitors
  • $7,914,702 – The value of daycare programs that allow parents to work
  • $743,312 – Outdoor recreation space

“Anecdotally, we have understood from the outset that the Kroc Centers are fulfilling Joan Kroc’s vision of enriching lives,” said Commissioner Jeffrey. “We are blessed to have the scale and expertise to successfully implement her vision, and we are pleased that the ‘Economic Halo Effect’ report confirms and quantifies this real and ongoing benefit to the people and communities we serve.”

Separately, the study measures the one-time impact of construction-related spending for the 25 Kroc Centers studied, which exceeded $1.7 billion, with nearly 15,000 jobs created.

The study does not include quantitative measures of individual impact related to individual counseling that helped keep families together, taught social values and skills, helped people find jobs, and more. While real and effective in their impact, insufficient economic valuation models led the researchers to exclude these activities from the overall total.

“Between the one-time impact of construction and the ongoing impact of the centers’ operations, we are extremely pleased to confirm that our Kroc Centers have already in effect surpassed the value of this amazing gift and will keep on giving through annual impact in those communities,” continued Commissioner Jeffrey.

“We thank our donors, volunteers and community partners for the critical role they play in ensuring that these community benefits continue and grow year after year.”

More information about the report is available at http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/usn/kroc-centers

About the Kroc Centers
In January 2004, The Salvation Army announced that Mrs. Kroc, widow of the McDonald’s franchise founder Ray Kroc, had bequeathed $1.5 billion to be separated equally among the organization’s four U.S. territories. The gift remains the second largest gift from an individual to a third party charity in American history.

Mrs. Kroc specifically directed The Salvation Army to use part of the money for endowments to help support the centers she envisioned across the United States, similar to the first Kroc Center she helped build in her hometown of San Diego with a gift of $90 million. That center continues to thrive, 13 years after its opening in a neighborhood that serves more than two dozen distinct ethnic groups.

Today, 26 Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Centers operate in communities across the United States and Puerto Rico.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to salvationarmyusa.org.

Kroc Center

Hampton Roads Kroc Center – The Salvation Army is about to celebrate it’s 1-year anniversary.

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The Salvation Army is about to celebrate a big anniversary, and it’s bringing in NFL Hall-of-Famer Emmitt Smith to lead the charge.

“We’re glad he’s coming to share the message of hope for young people to do the right thing. Build character,” said Major Stephen Long of the Salvation Army.

The Hampton Roads Kroc Center is at 1401 Ballentine Blvd. in Norfolk in the Broad Creek area. It’s a massive, positive place for children and families to get involved in programs together — from weight lifting at the gym to fitness classes to basketball to swimming in the giant indoor water park. There are music classes and character-building classes.

But the part of the Kroc Center that’s the favorite of 8 year-old Tye Austin might surprise you — church services.

“It’s fun and I like the service,” Tye said. “I learn how to behave better and how to respect parents better.”

Learning Christian values and becoming better individuals is something they value at the Kroc Center. Each year they hold a black-tie fundraising dinner to help families with membership fees. Last year’s dinner raised $96,000 and they hope to top that that this Thursday by bringing in the Super Bowl champ, who got his start in athletics participating in programs at the Salvation Army community center where he grew up.

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Gov’t of Liberia Gives $140K to The Salvation Army’s William Booth High School for Facelift

liberia salvation army

Monrovia — The Government of Liberia on April 8, 2015 presented a check in the amount of one hundred forty thousand, one hundred and fifty-five United States dollars (140,155), to the administration and officer in-Charge of the Salvation Army’s William Booth Junior & Senior High School that was gutted by fire on March 4th 2015.

Presenting the check on behalf of the Government, Liberia’s Assistant minister for Budget and Development planning Hon. Augustin K. Blama said restoring the burnt structure and providing furniture to enable the 983 students get back to classes are the result of the government commitment to providing education to all regardless of the sector.

He said, that the project is expected to be completed within 3o-days and believes upon completion it will change the narratives of warehouses and computer rooms and library been used for classrooms “it is imperative for our student at William Booth continues to learn in a conducive and healthy atmosphere free from fear of fire and crime” he added.

Minister Blama also encouraged students of the William Booth School to always seek to strive for the top and to report any suspicious activity that might affect their institution. He said the government remains steadfast in its continual commitment to educating the future generation of this country.

For her part, the Minister of Education Hon. Etmonia Tarpel expressed her frustration and disappointment over the burning of the school infrastructure. She, however, encouraged the family of the institution to be strong and keep the good work on going. ‘Those that did the act thought they were reigning evil upon this school, but let it be known that God has turned the evil into blessing” she added. She said the government will support your effort to the fullest in ensuring that our students are free from this unacceptable encounter.

In a brief remark, the Officer-in Charge of the Salvation Army Col. Gabriel Kathuri extend his gratitude to the government for rapid intervention to solve the unexpected distraction that have reduced our classrooms to warehouse, library computer lab etc. He said, with God, they shall bounce back and even shine brighter than before. Col. Kathuri at the same time encouraged those that cause this disaster to come out and confess.

The Salvation Army’s William Booth Junior & senior High School was gutted by fire on March 4, 2015, thus posting a serious hindrance which to a greater extend has prevented the institution from carrying out its normal academic activities.

From left, Terrance Bostic, Shaun Carroll and Miesha McLeod sing karaoke at the Chattanooga Salvation Army on McCallie Avenue recently. The Salvation Army offers karaoke every Wednesday to give area homeless people something to look forward to.
Photo by Dan Henry/Times Free Press.

Homeless karaoke lovers find a home at the Salvation Army

Karaoke

From left, Terrance Bostic, Shaun Carroll and Miesha McLeod sing karaoke at the Chattanooga Salvation Army on McCallie Avenue recently. The Salvation Army offers karaoke every Wednesday to give area homeless people something to look forward to. Photo by Dan Henry/Times Free Press.

A sleeping woman embraced her belongings in a corner booth, seemingly deaf to her surroundings as fellow homeless Chattanoogans took their turns belting out karaoke songs at the Chattanooga Salvation Army on Wednesday.

But she was the only one asleep — the rest of Chattanooga’s homeless karaoke lovers danced vigorously between the coffee tables at the small cafe.

Standing out of the way of the dancers, Jessica Owens, a 52-year-old who has been homeless on and off for the past eight years, waited to take the stage.

“I’m kind of shy but I used to sing when I was younger so this makes me feel good and brings back memories,” Owens said. “[Karaoke] gives me some peace, kinda gives me a little excitement, since the majority of the time I’m by myself.”

When she took the stage, she sang Whitney Houston, her favorite artist. Despite the eruption of applause when she finished, she kept her eyes low and offered only a hidden a smile.

Karaoke isn’t a hot shower, isn’t a free meal, isn’t a bed to sleep in — but it is a chance to feel human.

“Where else can homeless go to perform, be applauded and loved on in the Tennessee Valley?” asked Kimberly George, the director of marketing and development for the Salvation Army 614 Corps.

The weekly event offers people who love karaoke an alternative to going to a bar to sing, and brings people into the building who may otherwise not request help.

Sometimes karaoke can even change lives, said George. Since the karaoke events began three years ago, one man devoted his life to the seminary, and many others are now off the streets, some even returning to volunteer on a regular basis. George said she thinks karaoke day is unique to the Chattanooga location — no other programs like it are anywhere in the United States.

“It just touches my heart, seeing people trying to get off of the street,” said volunteer Fred Holland. “If they have a bad day or sad day or something on their mind, it allows them to sing it out instead of going out and doing drugs or getting in trouble.”

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Community Events

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The Salvation Army Annual Report 2014

 

 

The Salvation Army Annual Report

“He gathers the lambs in His arms and carries them close to His heart.”

This verse from the Book of Isaiah is the foundation for The Salvation Army’s 2013 Online Annual Report’s theme, “Open Arms”, now available here. Commissioner David Jeffery, The Salvation Army’s National Commander, had this verse come to mind saying, “It’s a sweet image, a beautiful reminder of the Lord’s gentleness in caring for the vulnerable”.

The Salvation Army strives to follow the Lord’s example of caring and opening our arms and our hearts to anyone in need. And we’re proud to report that, guided by God’s love and your compassion and support, The Salvation Army served 30 million Americans in 2013!

Throughout this last year and with the help of 3.5 million volunteers, The Salvation Army:
Served nearly 60 million meals to the hungry
Provided over 10 million nights of lodging to the homeless
Sent almost 200,000 low income and disadvantaged kids to summer camp
Counseled 180,000 men and women with drug and alcohol rehabilitation

Also featured in the annual report is an inspiring video of The Salvation Army’ s Angel Tree Program which helps provide nearly 1 million disadvantaged children across the United States.
As it truly takes an army, our services would not be possible without your help and support and we would like to take this opportunity to thank you for furthering our mission to Do The Most Good!
The Salvation Army is here for you. We welcome all with open doors, open hearts, and open arms.

Learn more through our annual report about The Salvation Army’s programs and services utilized by those in need in 2013.

Visit salvationarmyannualreport.org to read the 2013 Online Annual Report.

Krugerrand

Gold coin found in Salvation Army kettle

gold coin salvation army

Volunteers manning Salvation Army kettles in Naperville found a valuable gold coin amid the pocket change.

A 1-ounce South African Krugerrand worth about $1,300 was dropped into a kettle at Casey’s Foods on Dec. 6, according to the group. Casey’s was the site of a Krugerrand donation last year and also had a donor match contributions.

“We are so grateful for the generosity of our wonderful donors,” Salvation Army Aurora Corps Capt. Antonio Romero said in a news release. “The money raised from these red kettles goes directly to help fund the programs and services right here in our communities, so this coin will go a long way toward helping our friends and neighbors in need.”

Over the course of more than 25 years, the Salvation Army has received more than 400 gold coins, according to the group. Money donated in the kettles stay assists people in need with food, shelter, after-school programs and disaster relief.

So far this season, the Salvation Army’s Red Kettle Campaign has brought in more than $3.3 million, down about 8 percent compared to this time last year, which officials are attributing to the shorter holiday season. The group’s goal is to raise $13 million and it will have kettles on the streets until Dec. 24. Donations can also be made online through Jan. 31 at http://www.salarmychicago.org.

By Melissa Jenco, Chicago Tribune reporter