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EDS Update: Donate Now to Disaster Relief Efforts in Mexico Following Hurricane Patricia

An appeal has been established to help provide disaster relief in the wake of Hurricane Patricia in Mexico. The appeal has been set-up through The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO). To give:

– visit salar.my/HurricanePatricia

– call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

– Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office (designate “Hurricane Patricia”) can be sent to:International Relief Fund
P.O. Box 418558
Boston, MA 02241-8558

For more information, go to:

http://sawso.org/sawso/news/Salvation_Army_Mobilizing_to_Serve_Communities_in_Aftermath_of_Hurricane_Patricia

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Monsoon causes Nationwide Flooding Crisis in Myanmar

monsoon myanmarSince Myanmar’s monsoon season commenced in early June, almost 1 million individuals have been affected by widespread flooding – compounded by Cyclone Komen –  in 12 of the 14 states throughout the nation. Thought to be the worst flooding in years, aproximately one hundred people have died and 1.2 million acres of rice fields have been destroyed.

The Salvation Army is working alongside authorities and nongovernment organizations (NGO) to provide relief to the affected communities in the form of meals, water, and shelter. Infrastructure remains point of concern as roads and bridges have been destroyed, and in some instances, swept away by the flooding. Many Salvation Army buildings and amenities are housing those that have been displaced  from their homes. Long-term relief efforts will revolve around funding and redevelopment of homes, bogs, and wells.

With a one hundred-year presence in Myanmar, The Salvation Army will continue serving these communities long after the catastrophe is over.

The Salvation Army depends upon financial donations to fulfill the distinctive, urgent needs of communities in disaster, such as those within Myanmar. To help worldwide disaster relief efforts of The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO), please go tohttps://donate.salvationarmyusa.org/SAWSO and select “Disaster Relief & Reconstruction”.

About The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO)

SAWSO is committed to working hand-in-hand with local communities to help people who face challenges every day in countries around the globe. Created in 1977 as an independent 501(c) (3) to support the ministry of The Salvation Army, SAWSO has been strengthening global communities in need for nearly 38 years. SAWSO supports the Army’s impressive global footprint in 127 countries, developing long-term community-driven solutions to issues in the areas of:

· Community Health & HIV Prevention
· Livelihood & Empowerment 
· Anti-human Trafficking
· Disaster Relief & Recovery
· Education

To learn more, go to www.SAWSO.org.

The Salvation Army is committed to utilize philanthropic gifts in the manner donors desire. Occasionally, conditions in the field may alter relief activities. If this occurs, The Salvation Army will redirect funds to our International relief efforts in the area.

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It’s Hurricane Season… Are you ready?

Information for this article courtesy of the National Weather Service’s National Hurricane Center and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

What is a Hurricane?

A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone, which is a generic term for a low pressure system that generally forms in the tropics. The cyclone is accompanied by thunderstorms and, in the Northern Hemisphere, a counterclockwise circulation of winds near the earth’s surface.

When are Hurricanes most likely to occur?

Different areas of the world have different times when tropical cyclones are most likely to form. These periods are called Hurricane Seasons:

  • Atlantic and Caribbean: June 1 to November 30 with peak season mid-August to late October.
  • Central Pacific (Hawaii): June 1 to November 30 with peak season from July to September.
  • East Pacific: May 15 to November 30
  • Western North Pacific: Tropical cyclones can strike year round

Different Types of Tropical Cyclones

Tropical cyclones are classified as follows:

  • Tropical Depression. An organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds* of 38 mph or less
  • Tropical Storm. An organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39-73 mph (34-63 kt)
  • Hurricane. An intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 kt) or higher

Hurricanes are also categorized according to the strength of their winds using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. A Category 1 storm has the lowest wind speeds, while a Category 5 hurricane has the strongest. These are relative terms, because lower category storms can sometimes inflict greater damage than higher category storms, depending on where they strike and the particular hazards they bring. In fact, tropical storms can also produce significant damage and loss of life, mainly due to flooding.

Hurricane Names

When the winds from a tropical cyclone reaches 39 mph (34 kts), the cyclones are given names. Years ago, an international committee developed names for Atlantic cyclones (The History of Naming Hurricanes). In 1979 a six year rotating list of Atlantic storm names was adopted — alternating between male and female hurricane names. Storm names are used to facilitate geographic referencing, for warning services, for legal issues, and to reduce confusion when two or more tropical cyclones occur at the same time. Through a vote of the World Meteorological Organization Region IV Subcommittee, Atlantic cyclone names are retired usually when hurricanes result in substantial damage or death or for other special circumstances.

Hurricane Hazards

Storm Surge/Tide

Storm surge and large waves produced by hurricanes pose the greatest threat to life and property along the coast. Storm Surge is an abnormal rise of water generated by a storm’s winds. Storm surge can reach heights well over 20 feet and can span hundreds of miles of coastline.

In the northern hemisphere, the highest surge values typically occur in the right front quadrant of a hurricane coincident with onshore flow; in the southern hemisphere, the left front quadrant. More intense and larger hurricanes produce higher surge. In addition, shallower offshore waters contribute to higher storm surge inundation. Storm surge is by far the greatest threat to life and property along the immediate coast.

Storm Tide is the water level rise during a storm due to the combination of storm surge and the astronomical tide. For example, if a hurricane moves ashore at a high tide of 2 feet, a 15 foot surge would be added to the high tide, creating a storm tide of 17 feet. The combination of high winds and storm tide topped with battering waves can be deadly and cause tremendous property damage along an area of coastline hundreds of miles wide.

The destructive power of storm surge and large battering waves can result in loss of life, buildings destroyed, beach and dune erosion and road and bridge damage along the coast. Storm surge can travel several miles inland. In estuaries and bayous, salt water intrusion endangers public health and the environment.

Winds

Hurricane-force winds, 74 mph or more, can destroy buildings and mobile homes. Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding and small items left outside become flying missiles during hurricanes. Winds can stay above hurricane strength well inland. In 2004, Hurricane Charley made landfall at Punta Gorda on the southwest Florida coast and produced major damage well inland across central Florida with gusts of more than 100 mph.

Tropical cyclones can also produce dangerous tornadoes. It is not unusual for tornado watches to be issued as a storm makes landfall and these can continue well after the storm moves inland. Listen for tornado warnings and take cover as directed.

Rainfall

Tropical cyclones often produce widespread, torrential rains in excess of 6 inches, which may result in deadly and destructive floods. In fact, flooding is the major threat from tropical cyclones for people living inland.

Flash flooding, defined as a rapid rise in water levels, can occur quickly due to intense rainfall. Longer term flooding on rivers and streams can persist for several days after the storm.

Rainfall amounts are not directly related to the strength of tropical cyclones but rather to the speed and size of the storm, as well as the geography of the area. Slower moving and larger storms produce more rainfall. In addition, mountainous terrain enhances rainfall from a tropical cyclone.

Rip Currents

Even if a tropical cyclone stays well offshore, it can still be dangerous. The strong winds of a tropical cyclone can cause dangerous waves that pose a significant hazard to mariners and coastal residents and visitors. When the waves break along the coast, they can produce deadly rip currents—even at large distances from the storm.

Rip currents are channeled currents of water flowing away from shore, usually extending past the line of breaking waves that can pull even the strongest swimmers away from shore. In 2008, despite the fact that Hurricane Bertha was more than a 1,000 miles offshore, the storm resulted in rip currents that killed three people along the New Jersey coast and required 1,500 lifeguard rescues in Ocean City, Maryland, over a 1 week period. In 2009, all six deaths in the United States directly attributable to tropical cyclones occurred as the result of drowning from large waves or strong rip currents.

Before a Hurricane

To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:

  • Determine safe evacuation routes inland.
  • Learn locations of official shelters.
  • Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators and battery-powered equipment such as cell phones and your NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards receiver.
  • Buy food that will keep and store drinking water.
  • Review your insurance policy.
  • Make plans to secure your property. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.
  • If you have pets, include them in your preparedness plan. Look for pet-friendly hotels or shelters on your evacuation route.

Build An Emergency Kit

An Emergency Supplies Kit Should include:

  • At least a 3-day supply of water (one gallon per person, per day)
  • At least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food
  • At least, one change of clothing and shoes per person
  • One blanket or sleeping bag per person
  • First-aid kit
  • Battery-powered NWR and a portable radio
  • Flashlight, extra batteries
  • Extra set of car keys
  • Credit card and cash
  • Special items for infant, elderly or disabled family members
  • Prescription and non-prescription medicines
  • Pet supplies, including carrier, leash, food, tags and licenses

During a Hurricane

If a hurricane is likely in your area, you should:

  • Listen to the radio or TV for information.
  • Secure your home, close storm shutters, and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
  • Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
  • Moor your boat if time permits.
  • Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other large containers with water.

You should evacuate under the following conditions:

  • If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Be sure to follow their instructions.
  • If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure—such shelters are particularly hazardous during hurricanes no matter how well fastened to the ground.
  • If you live in a high-rise building—hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
  • If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an inland waterway.
  • If you feel you are in danger.

If you are unable to evacuate, go to your safe room. If you do not have one, follow these guidelines:

  • Stay indoors during the hurricane and away from windows and glass doors.
  • Close all interior doors—secure and brace external doors.
  • Keep curtains and blinds closed. Do not be fooled if there is a lull; it could be the eye of the storm – winds will pick up again.
  • Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level.
  • Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.

After the Storm

  • Keep listening to radio, TV or NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards for updated information.
  • Wait until an area is declared safe before entering. If you have evacuated, be patient.
  • Wait until local authorities have ensured the area is safe for reentry before you try to return home.
  • Watch for closed roads. If you come upon a barricade or a flooded road, Turn Around Don’t Drown!
  • Stay on firm, dry ground. Moving water only 6 inches deep can sweep you off your feet.
  • Standing water may be electrically charged from power lines.
  • If using a generator, avoid carbon monoxide poisoning by following the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Avoid weakened bridges and washed out roads.
  • Once home, check gas, water and electrical and appliances for damage.
  • Use a flashlight to inspect damage. Never use candles and other open flames indoors.
  • Wear proper shoes to prevent cutting feet on sharp debris.
  • Do not drink or prepare food with tap water until officials say it is safe.
  • Avoid electrocution by not walking in areas with downed power poles or standing water.

Know These Key Terms

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a hurricane hazard:

Tropical Depression. An organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 38 MPH (33 knots) or less. Sustained winds are defined as one-minute average wind measured at about 33 ft (10 meters) above the surface.

Tropical Storm. An organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39–73 MPH (34–63 knots).

Hurricane. An intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 MPH (64 knots) or higher.

Storm Surge. A dome of water pushed onshore by hurricane and tropical storm winds. Storm surges can reach 25 feet high and be 50–1000 miles wide.

Storm Tide. A combination of storm surge and the normal tide (i.e., a 15-foot storm surge combined with a 2-foot normal high tide over the mean sea level created a 17-foot storm tide).

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Watch. Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are possible in the specified area, usually within 36 hours. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Warning. Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are expected in the specified area, usually within 24 hours.

Short Term Watches and Warnings. These warnings provide detailed information about specific hurricane threats, such as flash floods and tornadoes.

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Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its services

Salvation Army sees rise in clients utilizing its servicesFernando Mena sat at a cafeteria table consuming a hot dog, chili and potato chips.

The 25-yr-old who stated he lives in the woods began going to The Salvation Army 3 times a day for meals after recently quitting his job cleaning at a fast-food restaurant. Mena cited well being issues as the rationale behind quitting his job and stated he’s in search of temp jobs.

At one other table, Artherine Booth, seventy five, sat with a few buddies. Ms. Booth moved in to The Salvation Army ladies’s shelter in June after having to leave her previous residence.

She is planning to move into the Catherine Booth Gardens of Tyler, one of two residential facilities that The Salvation Army operates for low-income and senior citizens via a federal government contract.

Though Disa Brown has a house she shares together with her fiancé and eighty three-yr-old father, she eats lunch at The Salvation Army two to 5 times every week, one thing she’s done off and on for the past 4 years.

“It simply is significant, because Tyler isn’t a large metropolis, and it doesn’t have a whole lot of assistance for us, so for this to be right here to feed us three meals a day, it means so much to lots of people who don’t have,” stated Ms. Brown, 36, who described herself as a homemaker and self-employed. “You by no means know when your life can turn around and you don’t have anything.”

These individuals are amongst a rising number of East Texas residents who’re going to The Salvation Army for meals.

This summer, the nonprofit has seen a 40% increase, from 5,000 to 7,000, in weekly meals served.

In addition, about 10% of the 127 shelter residents are within the facility due to climate.

The nonprofit has a 200-bed facility and further housing area for 250 cots for emergency situations. Water and cooling stations for short-term use can also be found.

Director of Development Cindy Bell mentioned, because the Salvation Army doesn’t survey their shoppers, they can’t formally attribute the rise to one thing in particular.

However anecdotally, they stated the summer season does create greater pressure on folks, as a result of rising utility cost, and people must make harder decisions about the way to spend their cash.

“I have to decide, ‘do I buy meals for my household or the medication that I need?” Ms. Bell mentioned.

Lindsey Galabeas, The Salvation Army’s community and public relations coordinator, mentioned when individuals already live paycheck to paycheck, any increase in expenses, makes it tougher.

For the organization, the challenge comes as a result of, despite the fact that the individuals utilizing its services are growing, donations are declining as they usually do throughout the summer season.

“Lots of people consider us as a Christmas group,” Ms. Galabeas stated. The fact is the group is largely active throughout  the year.

The nonprofit’s services include men’s, women’s and family shelters, free daily meals, a residential drug rehabilitation program, rent and utility assistance, emergency disaster services and afterschool programs.

The agency is seeking donations to help fund its programs, which is about $four million for the shelters, social services and administration buildings.

Ms. Bell stated the company has a lean budget, and 87 cents of each $1 donated goes to services.

Twitter: @TMTEmily

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HOW TO GIVE

The Salvation Army of Tyler is in need of monetary donations to help fund the growing number of clients utilizing its services. For more details about The Salvation Army or to donate, go to www.salvationarmytexas.org/tyler , stop by the office at 633 N. Broadway Ave. in Tyler, or call 903-592-4361.

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DINING AT THE SALVATION ARMY

The Salvation Army serves three meals a day Sunday through Friday and two meals a day on Saturday. These free meals are open to the general public. Serving times are as follows:

Monday-Friday

Breakfast: 7 to 7:45 a.m.

Lunch: 12 to 12:45 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5 p.m.

Saturday

Brunch: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Sunday

Breakfast: 8 to 8:30 a.m.

Lunch: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Dinner: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

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Salvation Army Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

This post was contributed by The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO)

The Salvation Army continues to serve communities in and around Kathmandu following two earthquakes on April 25 and May 12 that killed 8,787 people and destroyed more than 500,000 homes.

Emergency response teams of The Salvation Army have been serving survivors in the urban and rural areas with operations revolving around camps for displaced people, including camp management roles and the provision of food, shelter, and water. Teams are also assisting many remote mountainous villages that are now isolated due to landslides from the earthquakes and subsequent rains from monsoons.

The Salvation Army has so far distributed 148 metric tons of food – including rice, oil, lentils and salt – to survivors, as many people have lost all of their food. This support will sustain families until the upcoming harvest. Additionally, hundreds of hygiene and sanitation items were distributed.

Relief Efforts Continue in Nepal

“This disaster response is especially complicated due to the remote and rugged nature of the terrain in Nepal, making the delivery of aid especially challenging,” said Betsy Baldwin, Disaster Technical Advisor for The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO). “This has meant greater coordination and creativity has been required to reach remote communities and ensure that the limited amount of assistance does not duplicate the work of others.”

Funding from SAWSO is supporting the development of temporary housing and learning centers in the place of schools that were damaged in the earthquake. Approximately 3,000 tarps were distributed to community members needing covered living space and temporary learning spaces while schools are reconstructed.

In continued support of schooling in the area, The Salvation Army provided 850 educational stationery packs to children returning to temporary classrooms.

“Where the spotlight was once on the debris and the aftermath of this disaster, it has now shifted to The Salvation Army and its capacity to provide long-term relief efforts for this community in need,” said Lt. Colonel William Mockabee, Executive Director for SAWSO. “At SAWSO we seek opportunities to support the local Salvation Army – which has been serving the Nepal community since opening its doors in 2009 – and are privileged to fund this project that will develop temporary learning centers for children to get back to school.”

Electricity remains an issue for most mountain villages, particularly at night when steep ledges and terraced hillsides are now difficult to see and quite dangerous. The Salvation Army distributed 904 solar lamps to individuals and families in these areas to ensure their safety.

The Salvation Army’s valued relationship with Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) has allowed emergency response teams to deliver relief items such as this to rural mountain areas. Additional support from The UPS Foundation allowed SAWSO to coordinate the shipment and delivery of 1,000 tents and mosquito nets.

Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. The Salvation Army has set up a designated fund for relief efforts in Nepal. To give, visit salar.my/Nepal or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769). Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office (designate “Nepal Earthquake”) can be sent to:

International Relief Fund
P.O. Box 418558
Boston, MA 02241-8558

In-kind donations are not being accepted.

The Salvation Army is committed to utilize philanthropic gifts in the manner donors desire. Occasionally, conditions in the field may alter relief activities. If this occurs, The Salvation Army will redirect funds to our International relief efforts in the area.

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Salvation Army accepting donations for Nepal earthquake victims

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Donations for Nepal are being accepted

The Salvation Army is mobilizing emergency response personnel and supplies after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Nepal flattened homes and buildings, causing widespread damage across the region and killing more than 2,000 people.

With more than 75 offices throughout the area, volunteers and staff are well-prepared to service the immediate and long-term needs of those impacted by natural disasters. Since 1882, the Salvation Army has served the people of its India Eastern territory.

“Donations from the generous public will help provide basic necessities that survivors desperately need right now,” said Lt. Col. Ron Busroe, the Salvation Army’s national community relations and development secretary. “But the effects of this tragedy will be felt for months – even years. We know that emotional and spiritual counseling is equally important for survivors to deal with the gravity of the situation.”

Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. The Salvation Army has set up a designated fund in which 100 percent of gifts will go to relief efforts in Nepal. To donate, visit salar.my/Nepal or call 800-SAL-ARMY.

Check donations to Salvation Army World Service Office, designated for “Nepal Earthquake,” can be sent to: Salvation Army World Service Office, International Relief Fund, P.O. Box 418558, Boston, MA 02241-8558.

In-kind donations are not being accepted.

It’s Severe Weather Preparedness Week. Are you prepared?

Each year, people in the United States are killed or injured by any number of severe weather. That includes storms that had advanced warning. And while 2014 was a relatively quiet storm season compared to past years, it’s even more crucial to take advantage now and get prepared for a disaster that could strike at any moment.In recognition of National Severe Weather Preparedness Week-a week dedicated to highlighting the importance of being prepared for severe weather-we hope to inspire you to gather the family and put together an emergency plan. Preparing for severe weather does not have to be complicated or even expensive and it could mean the survival of you and your loved ones.The Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services (EDS) crews are constantly monitoring potential weather disasters and are ready to serve immediately. They also strongly encourage disaster preparedness.This is a great time to get the family together and get started on your emergency plan. To help you get started, here a few basic tips courtesy of Ready. gov on how to prepare a basic disaster kit:
  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger
And don’t forget items for your pets!
  • Pack extra pet food and water for 3-5 days
  • Medication and medical records and a first aid kit
  • Sturdy leash or harnessFor more information or tips on how to better prepare your family for an emergency, check out  The Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services or other organizations such as: FEMA, Ready.Gov, , and the American Red Cross
Category: Disaster Services · Tags: Severe WeatherPrepardness Week, The Salvation Army. EDS. Emergency Disaster
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Community Events

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The Salvation Army Annual Report 2014

 

 

The Salvation Army Annual Report

“He gathers the lambs in His arms and carries them close to His heart.”

This verse from the Book of Isaiah is the foundation for The Salvation Army’s 2013 Online Annual Report’s theme, “Open Arms”, now available here. Commissioner David Jeffery, The Salvation Army’s National Commander, had this verse come to mind saying, “It’s a sweet image, a beautiful reminder of the Lord’s gentleness in caring for the vulnerable”.

The Salvation Army strives to follow the Lord’s example of caring and opening our arms and our hearts to anyone in need. And we’re proud to report that, guided by God’s love and your compassion and support, The Salvation Army served 30 million Americans in 2013!

Throughout this last year and with the help of 3.5 million volunteers, The Salvation Army:
Served nearly 60 million meals to the hungry
Provided over 10 million nights of lodging to the homeless
Sent almost 200,000 low income and disadvantaged kids to summer camp
Counseled 180,000 men and women with drug and alcohol rehabilitation

Also featured in the annual report is an inspiring video of The Salvation Army’ s Angel Tree Program which helps provide nearly 1 million disadvantaged children across the United States.
As it truly takes an army, our services would not be possible without your help and support and we would like to take this opportunity to thank you for furthering our mission to Do The Most Good!
The Salvation Army is here for you. We welcome all with open doors, open hearts, and open arms.

Learn more through our annual report about The Salvation Army’s programs and services utilized by those in need in 2013.

Visit salvationarmyannualreport.org to read the 2013 Online Annual Report.

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Earthquake in Napa California – The Salvation Army Responds

The Salvation Army is providing food, shelter, water, and emotional and spiritual care to survivors and first responders of a 6.0 earthquake that shocked Northern California on August 24.

The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services (EDS) has deployed multiple canteens (mobile feeding units) to the Napa area. Additional teams sent to the evacuation center in Napa are serving meals to displaced residents and first responders. Two other canteens have been stationed in other parts of Napa to also serve meals: the Salvador Mobile Estates and the Napa Valley Mobile Home Park.The Salvation Army will continue to assess the ongoing needs and how to best assist residents and first responders throughout the response process. Salvation Army personnel and volunteers are trained, and prepared, to provide relief and emotional and spiritual care for as long as needed.Monetary donations are the most critical need as supplies and personnel are mobilized.
  • To support relief and long-term recovery efforts, visit SalvationArmyUSA.org or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769) to designate donation for “Napa Earthquake”
  • Text the word “IGIVE” to 80888 to make a $10 donation through your mobile phone; to confirm your gift, respond with the word “Yes”*• Donations in the form of checks designated to “Napa Earthquake” may be mailed to The Salvation Army, Del Oro Divisional Headquarters, PO Box 348000, Sacramento, CA 958934
  • https://donate.salvationarmyusa.org/deloro/donation-pages/napaearthquake For more information on The Salvation Army’s continued response, visit blog.salvationarmyusa.org, facebook.com/salvationarmyusa or twitter.com/salvationarmyus.
*A one-time donation of $10 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. Message and data rates may apply. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on Verizon Wireless, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile. All donations must be authorized by account holder. By participating, you certify that you are 18 years or older and/or have parental permission. Donations are collected for The Salvation Army and subject to the terms found at igfn.org/t. Privacy policy: igfn.org/p.**Text STOP to 80888 to stop; text HELP to 80888 for help.**  About The Salvation ArmyThe Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter for the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. Eighty-two cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, visit SalvationArmyUSA.org.###